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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 92 Open Source Apps That Replace Everyday Software srlinuxx 19/01/2012 - 2:16am
Story 6 Useful Graphical Git Client for Linux srlinuxx 19/01/2012 - 2:14am
Story Why I pirate srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 10:55pm
Story NASA looks to lower open source licensing barriers srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 10:41pm
Story Who can NOT afford Open Source Software? srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 10:06pm
Story Canonical backtracks on deleting Oracle's Sun Java srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 9:49pm
Story Red Hat weighs in on Internet regulations srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 8:10pm
Story Get Ready For VLC Media Player 2.0 srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 7:36pm
Story Linux Web Browser Round-Up srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 7:18pm
Story Epiphany marches on srlinuxx 18/01/2012 - 6:51pm

Desktop diagramming with Dia and Kivio

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freesoftwaremagazine: Don't let the simplicity of use fool you. Both Kivio and Dia, two free software diagramming tools, are very efficient at what they do. If you need to design a complex flow chart or create a no-fuss UML diagram then you could do a lot worse than to choose either of these packages.

New in Fedora 7: xdg user directories

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/home/liquidat: One seldom mentioned new features of Fedora 7 are the new directories in the $HOME directory. These are due to the xdg-users-dir program from the Portland xdg project. In other news, Hello Planet Fedora.

The open source governmental adoption wave

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Matt Asay: I plowed through Jyh-An Lee's article in the Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment and Technology Law. It presents a very interesting face on the rising trend of open source adoption by national and local governments worldwide, including offering some reasons for the trend.

The dark art of removing the Flash plugin from Firefox in Ubuntu Linux

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Click: -- the Web site from the newspaper I work for -- is covered in Flash. Adds, content come-ons, etc., and it was dragging my old systems to a crawl. But how to get rid of Flash? It's not so easy.

Ten Things I Love About ArchLinux

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Urban Puddle: I've used Arch before and this article isn't about how it does on the Desktop or how well it installs. After getting up and running with Arch again, I discovered there are things about it that I just absolutely love. Here are my top 10.

Trolltech's Qt 4.3.0 really begins to dazzle

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blogbeebe: It's not hard to impress me with new visual software. I love eye candy, the flashier the better. So it should come as no surprise that I'm awfully impressed with the latest version of the Qt framework, 4.3.0. I installed it on three systems for a quick and dirty evaluation.

The Top 10 Firefox Themes

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Great Design: I am posting about the top 10 Firefox themes. The themes improve the look and feel of Firefox. In no particular order is the Top 10 Firefox themes.

Pick your own OOo, there must be one for you!

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Free Software Mag Blogs: is probably the biggest free software project in existence today. It certainly is the biggest single piece of software one can download. It directly competes with Microsoft Office, is a bit more easy to install than KOffice, and is very complete. But what will you get?

Jumpstarting Ubuntu 7.04 "Feisty Fawn"

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Network World: Tired of the Micro$oft monoculture? Tired of buying new versions of Windows every few years, only to find the new version won't run on your current hardware? Wishing for something better/faster/cheaper?

Catching Up With JOST

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Linux Journal: Three months ago I introduced my readers to a new system for hosting VST plugins compiled natively for Linux. That system has continued its development and has become a mainstay in the Studio Dave Linux audio arsenal. Here's an update on the system's recent incarnations, complete with the usual multimedia extravaganza of text, screenshots, and sounds.

Ubuntu Linux on my Dell XPS M1210

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Planet Chiropractic: Just a few months ago I purchased a Dell XPS M1210 laptop that came shipped with Windows XP Media Center Edition and I was hoping Dell was going to include this model in their release. While I could find no evidence that Dell is planning to offer this laptop with a Linux based system, I had no problem downloading the free Ubuntu operating system and installing it on my notebook.

My Experience with Akregator Feed Reader

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Linux App Finder: Back in March I started looking for a new feed reader. I had been using Opera's built in RSS capabilities, but it didn't offer the control I was looking for. As a KDE user my first stop was Akregator and I never felt the need to look anywhere else.

Semantic Desktop and KDE 4 - State and Plans of Nepomuk-KDE

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/home/liquidat: Nepomuk-KDE is the basis for the semantic technologies we will see in KDE 4. Sebastian Trüg, the main developer behind Nepomuk-KDE, provided me with some up2date information about the current state and future plans.

Novell's Take on the GPLv3 Draft

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Novell Open PR: Nothing in the last call draft of GPLv3 suggests that the final version of GPLv3 will inhibit Novell’s ability to include GPLv3 technologies in SUSE Linux Enterprise, openSUSE, and other Novell offerings as these technologies become available.

AMD 8.37.6 Display Driver

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Phoronix: Today AMD delivered the 8.37.6 Linux display driver. Affecting this driver the most is support for X server version 1.3 and appended several other fixes along with a slight upgrade to the AMD Catalyst Control Center Linux Edition. While no AIGLX support was added or no new features introduced, the upgrade should be worth the time.

Linux: Compacting Memory

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kernelTRAP: Mel Gorman offered a first release of a patchset that compacts memory, "this is a prototype for compacting memory to reduce external fragmentation so that free memory exists as fewer, but larger contiguous blocks."

PC-BSD 1.3

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BSD PC-BSD should make an interesting change for two main reasons. Firstly, it uses a BSD kernel, as opposed to the Linux kernel used in distributions such as Debian and Slackware. Secondly, its main method of installing new programs seems to be closer to that of Windows than apt. So, let's see if its claims of user friendliness are accurate.

GPLv3: the sting remains, says RMS

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iTWire: The Free Software Foundation will publish the last call draft of the third revision of its General Public License (GPLv3) today and has retained sufficient bite in it to penalise Microsoft.

Also: Richard Stallman: Why upgrade to GPL version 3
And: GPLv3 - Last call draft

Fedora 7 Release Adds Installable KDE Live CD

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Linux The Fedora Project has announced the immediate availability of their latest release, Fedora 7 (Moonshine) including, for the first time, a KDE live CD/DVD showcasing KDE and KDE applications, which can also be installed to the hard disk, resulting in a regular Fedora installation with KDE.

Also: Customize Your New Red Hat Fedora
And: Highly flexible Fedora 7 Linux arrives
&: Fedora 8 and Proposed Release Schedule

How to Fix Slow Fesity Boot For Laptops

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Ubuntu Geek: Feisty has a terrible boot time on laptops compared to server (roughly 3x as long) even though it is a faster computer. You can speedup your boot time from over a minute to roughly 30 seconds by doing the following.

Also: How to reboot or shutdown your Linux system if you find yourself without a GUI

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.