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Tuesday, 31 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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OpenOffice extension rivals SharePoint

Filed under
Software

Most people think that OpenOffice.org is a strong office-suite in its own right. But, when it came to a back-office document collaboration and management engine, like Microsoft SharePoint to enable OpenOffice users to work together, it was a different story.

Photos: Top 10 pieces of Linux kit

Filed under
Linux

From robots to ice cream machines, from Xbox to MP3 players to phones...

Featured Here.

How GPL fits in with the future of antitrust regulation

Filed under
OSS

People are permitted to make and distribute derivative works only if they adhere to the same license terms as the original work. Accordingly, as noted by the court, "the GPL propagates from user to user and revision to revision; neither the original author, nor any creator of a revised or improved version, may charge for the software or allow any successor to charge."

Why open source is ready for the enterprise: beyond free stuff

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OSS

Open source is certainly hot among the tech community, but if you mention the concept to IT leaders in the enterprise environment, they tend to immediately cringe. The inference being that "free stuff" can't possibly match the quality of products you pay for -- and the "DIY approach" is not manageable or secure enough for large enterprises. This kind of rash write-off plainly misses the mark!

UK MPs criticise government for blocking Open Source Software

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OSS

A group of UK MPs has criticised the government because they say that the Department of Education and Skills (DfES) and Becta policies favours proprietary software vendors (such as Microsoft) in schools and colleges rather than allowing for the adoption of open source software.

Install Microsoft Core,Windows Truetype,Ubuntu Title,Macintosh Fonts in Ubuntu

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HowTos

Ubuntu uses Defoma,the Debian Font Manager,to centralize and simplify font management across all applications.Defoma, which stands for DEbian FOnt MAnager, provides a framework for automatic font configuration. An application whose configuration of fonts usually requires manual intervention can automate the process through Defoma, by installing a Defoma-configuration script. The script gets called whenever a font is installed and removed, so that the script may update the application configuration.Debian Font Manager — automatic font configuration framework.

Create a Custom Live Linux CD - Leveraging BusyBox and OpenSSH

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HowTos

These steps will show you how to create a functioning Linux system, with the latest 2.6 kernel compiled from source, and how to integrate the BusyBox utilities including the installation of DHCP. Plus, how to compile in the OpenSSH package.

Controlling disk space with symbolic links

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HowTos

Let's say you have a system with a few filesystems. One of those systems is getting tight on space, but the other has plenty of room. There are several ways to handle that. You could use a symbolic link.

BasKet makes organization easy

Filed under
Software

BasKet is a multipurpose note-taking application that allows you to collect and organize text, pictures, files, and more. BasKet 0.6.0, released last month, sports a new interface and improved features over previous releases.

WoW Linux Gamers' Ban Lifted

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Gaming

In a frenzy of bans, Blizzard mistakenly banned a few Linux users who used a legitimate program called 'Cedega' to play WoW. Blizzard Entertainment deeply regrets the error, as we understand that this brief account closure presented you with an inconvenient and highly frustrating experience.

Ubuntu Wins Most User Friendly Linux Distribution Award

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Ltd today announced it has scooped another two awards for Ubuntu, its leading-edge Linux distribution. At the Linux New Media Awards, on Wednesday 15th November, Ubuntu was awarded 'Most User-Friendly Linux Distribution', and Canonical the 'Best combination of Community and Commerce'.

Tips for new Gentoo users

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Gentoo

Gentoo is one of the most difficult distributions to learn, though veteran Gentoo users might point out that its friendly community and extensive documentation can help new users. Here are some tips that might make Gentoo easier for anyone who wants to give it a try.

Mark Shuttleworth: Pervasive support (2)

Filed under
Linux

I have this weird relationship with the words “it’s not supported”. Whenever I’m talking to an audience of typical computer users about Linux I’ll hear those words. So why do people say “Linux is not supported”?

Combining OpenOffice.org text documents using master files

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HowTos

One of the recurring tasks in these inescapable group projects is combining your work for the final presentation. You can choose to copy and paste, or choose Insert > File, to combine the documents. But on a grand scale and with multiple authors continuing to update their content, this can cause problems.

Creating a managed website—Part 1

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HowTos

Do you manage a website? Maybe you’re looking after the site for a small business. Maybe you’re doing it for a community group. Perhaps it’s your own personal site. You’d like it to be dynamic: to have some fresh news every week and a home page that’s always up to date. Therein lies the problem.

Also: Improving website security

Step-By-Step Configuration of NAT with iptables

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up network-address-translation (NAT) on a Linux system with iptables rules so that the system can act as a gateway and provide internet access to multiple hosts on a local network using a single public IP address. This is achieved by rewriting the source and/or destination addresses of IP packets as they pass through the NAT system.

http://www.howtoforge.com/nat_iptables

A few tips for starting KDE4 development

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KDE

If you want to start building KDE4, here are a few hints, gathered from the most frequent questions I hear.

A week with SuSE 10

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Reviews
SUSE

A series of events led me to installing a copy of Novell's Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 last week. Given the hype that Novell had made around the distribution I was expecting to be impressed. And I was.

Dirk Dashing 1.02 released

Filed under
Gaming

Today a Dirk Dashing update has been released for Linux, to fix several bugs found by Linux gamers. This include fixed another problem with the game locking up on some distributions, camera movement near the edge of map, and a bug when restarting a level after dying and camera is not positioned correctly.

More Here.

TurboLinux's Wizpy: bootable Linux on a PMP

Filed under
Linux

We've all seen plenty of Linux computers on a stick before, right? But check the TurboLinux Wizpy which brings all that portable Linux PC and USB mass storage goodness wrapped inside a DivX capable MP3 player. The Wizpy features a 1.7-inch OLED display, 4GB of flash memory, an FM radio, and additional support for OGG/WMA/AAC formats. It comes pre-loaded with Turbolinux Fuji and a smattering of apps such as Firefox, Thunderbird, and Skype.

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More in Tux Machines

Comparing live version upgrade methods

When I review a distribution I always begin by performing a fresh installation of the operating system. This gives the latest version of the project a chance to stand on its own without complications. However, many of us do not perform fresh installations on our operating systems each time we want to upgrade to the latest release. Some of us, in order to preserve settings or installed packages, prefer to upgrade our existing operating system without starting over from scratch. This week I decided to take five open source operating systems through an upgrade process from their penultimate release to their latest version. Read more

Porteus Kiosk 4.0 Modular Linux Web Kiosk Released, Drops Chrome 32-bit Support

Porteus Solutions' Tomasz Jokiel announced on May 30, 2016, the release of the final Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 Web Kiosk operating system based on the latest GNU/Linux technologies and open-source software. Porteus Kiosk 4.0.0 comes three months after the release of the last maintenance build in the Porteus Kiosk 3.x series, introducing numerous new features and improvements. But first, let's take a quick look under the hood, as the OS is now powered by Linux kernel 4.4.11 LTS (Long Term Support), and it's based on the Mozilla Firefox 45.1.1 ESR and Google Chrome 50.0.2661.102 web browsers. Read more

Fresh 10-Way GeForce Linux Benchmarks With The NVIDIA 367.18 Driver

In prepping for our forthcoming GeForce GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 Linux benchmarking, I've been running fresh rounds of benchmarks on my large assortment of GPUs, beginning with the GeForce hardware supported by the NVIDIA 367.18 beta driver. Here are the first of those benchmarks with the ten Maxwell/Kepler GPUs I've tested thus far. Earlier this month I posted the With Pascal Ahead, A 16-Way Recap From NVIDIA's 9800 GTX To Maxwell but in still waiting for my GTX 1070/1080 samples to arrive, I've restarted all of those tests now using the newer 367.18 driver as well as incorporating some extra tests like the recently released F1 2015 for Linux, not having done any SHOC OpenCL tests in a while, etc. Read more

Arch Linux-Based ArchAssault Ethical Hacking Distro Changes Name to ArchStrike

The team over at ArchAssault, a GNU/Linux operating system based on the famous Arch Linux distro and designed for ethical hackers, announced a few minutes ago on their Twitter account that they are changing the OS' name to ArchStrike. Designed from the ground up as a security layer to Arch Linux, the ArchAssault project provides security researchers and hackers with one of the most powerful open source and totally free Linux kernel-based operating system for penetration testing and security auditing operations. Read more