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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Recovering data from a damaged partition

Filed under
HowTos

Most of the time GNU/Linux is a powerful Operating System. Sometimes, i wish i had think thought before using one of its great console command, the simple and rapid dd.

In order to make room on one hard drive, i used dd to sweep the first 512 bytes of the boot sector, in order to let the other operating system to boot by itself instead of using lilo.

Step 1: what is missing ?

How to display Microsoft fonts like in Windows in CentOS?

Filed under
HowTos

Staying in front of your computer for hours and hours with the default fonts can be a challenge on Linux/Unix. I, for one, can't work properly without the Windows fonts comfort Smile

People Behind KDE: Pino Toscano

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Pino Toscano
Date: 15th March 2007

A SHORT INTRO

Age: 21
Located in: Catania, Italy
Occupation: University student
Nickname on IRC: pinotree
Claim to Fame: okular, kig, KDE-Edu
Fav. KDE applications: Konqueror, Kate, KNetwalk
Blog: http://www.kdedevelopers.org/blog/2661

THE INTERVIEW

In what ways do you make a contribution to KDE?

The Magic of Simultaneous Contrast

Filed under
Howtos

The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to the idea of simultaneous contrast and to the amazing effects of color interactions. Color is the single most important tool that artists and designers used throughout the ages to beautify their environment. But to use color effectively one has to understand its basic functions, its psychological and visual impacts on the environment.

Development Release: openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 2

Filed under
Linux

Development Release: openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 2 - Andreas Jaeger has announced the second alpha release of openSUSE 10.3: "I'm glad to announce the second public alpha release of openSUSE 10.3. Call for testing: We're using the libata stack now also for IDE controllers.

Novell deal yields dividends - for Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

A "sizeable number" of developers have jumped ship from Novell to Red Hat, according to Scott Crenshaw, the senior director for product management and marketing at Red Hat.

Novell users say Linux transitions successful

Filed under
SUSE

As Novell kicks off its annual user conference, customers are enthusiastic about their transitions from the legacy NetWare operating system to Linux. There’s discord, however, among Novell users regarding the company’s controversial technology pact with Microsoft.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Where's Mandriva?

Filed under
MDV

Big news about Linux has come out of France in the past month or so.

In February, French automaker Peugeot Citroen announced it would be migrating 20,000 Windows desktops to Linux. Then, just last week, the French Parliament, which had already decided to shift its administrative systems to Linux, announced the finalization of those plans.

Installing Ubuntu Linux on a usb pendrive

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial will show how-to install Ubuntu on a usb stick. Even though this tutorial uses Ubuntu as its base distribution, you could virtually use any type of Linux liveCD distribution.

Mozilla Security: More Than Meets The 'Aye'

Filed under
Moz/FF

If open source by definition means that code is open, then why is Mozilla having some of its code discussions behind closed doors? The reason is simple: to protect users.

Book Review: The Linux Programmer's Toolbox

Filed under
Reviews

Regular readers here know I don't say "wow" lightly. I may like a book, I may even think it's useful or even something you really should have, but very few really make my jaw drop. This is one that gets a "wow".

Introduction: FLAC, the Free Lossless Audio Codec

Filed under
Software

As you might have guessed from the title of this article, FLAC is an abbreviation of Free Lossless Audio Codec. The first word ("free") should be pretty clear (it's an open-source project), but what is a "lossless audio codec"?

Open source video editing still has a long way to go

Filed under
Software

Once or twice a year I look at FOSS video editing tools to see if they're ready for everyday use by advanced amateur and low-end professional video makers, which is where I classify myself in the video production hierarchy.

Tale of Two Operating Systems: Vista and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS

Last week I had the opportunity to try two new operating systems: Microsoft Vista (Home Premium) and the Ubuntu Linux distribution (6.10, Edgy Eft).

Shopping with the Mozilla Amazon Browser

Filed under
Software

Amazon.com is the most popular online retailer. While you can, of course, access the site with any browser, developer Fabio Serra has created Mozilla Amazon Browser (MAB), a browser-based application that relies on Mozilla's XML User Interface Language (XUL) technology to implement its graphical user interface.

Linux vs. Windows: Which is Most Secure?

Filed under
OS

I’m more secure on Linux than I am on Windows. My primary desktop is on a Macbook Pro – the best computer I’ve ever owned, without any doubt. I consider myself very open-minded and will always give credit where it’s due. Heck, some of my best friends use Windows.

Firefox Goes Where Few Browsers Have Gone Before

Filed under
Moz/FF

In 2002 the Mozilla Foundation released Mozilla 1.0, finally delivering on the promise of an open-source browser descended from the original Netscape Navigator browser code.

But while Mozilla 1.0 received many kudos from reviewers (including eWEEK Labs), it failed to make much of a dent in the 96 percent market share that Microsoft's Internet Explorer enjoyed at the time.

Happy Birthday, Penguin Pete's

Filed under
Web

Penguin Pete celebrates his site's first birthday today. We congratulate him on a most excellent site. His articles are funny, intelligent, informative, gramatically correct, and sometimes controversial. I enjoy Penguin Pete's site, frequently link to it, and hope it will be around for a long time to come.

In an article on his site today he discusses the first year and his top stories:

Linux Musings drift in from China

Filed under
Linux

Could Linux be the nearly perfect solution to the computing ills in China? Well, a little yes, and lots of no.

Notes on Submitting Content

Filed under
Site News

Lord knows I appreciate all the 'news submissions' I can get. In fact, I've often thought of asking around for a 'Number One' to help me run the site in that area. But I have a few notes for those submitting, especially if you've noticed your submission not published.

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