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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 21 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux is Not Free

  • Facebook Goes Open Source Under CPAL
  • Will Lintel Replace Wintel and iStuff?
  • French government portal using Drupal
  • The HeliOS Project Laptop Raffle
  • Mozilla: 7 years old and as idealistic as ever
  • A tinderbox is not enough — Reprise
  • DIY Dual Atom Nettop System

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Fix Amarok or Xine "no codec found" issue

  • Upgrade multiple debian systems with Approx
  • Understanding Symbolic Links
  • Tweeting via Pidgin on Ubuntu
  • Installing Windows 7 RC 7100 and Ubuntu 9.04
  • Convert mp4 to mp3 with Ubuntu
  • Adding Color to Bash List Command
  • Encrypt Conversations in Pidgin on Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives
  • Customising Linux Terminals: Insults in sudo
  • get the list of subdirectories with their owner & permissions and full paths
  • Make a Glossy Tux Keychain

MEPIS goes kaboom, time to try openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

nixtu.blogspot: As KDE 4.2.4 was just released I became really eager to try it out. MEPIS is still based on 3.5 by default. There is a fork known as DanumLinux that provides 4.2, though.

Users Are Not As Stupid as the FUDsters Say

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: In my younger days I had an official motto: "You're never too old to try something new; computers are a heck of a lot of fun; and anyone can learn to do anything."

Why starting a KDE application with just su failed?

Filed under
KDE
MDV

linux-wizard.net: Several times users where surprised by the new behavior of KDE 4 applications. When just using su instead of su -, this will failed. Why? The explication is very simple.

Evolution – The Default Email Client for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

acurrie.wordpress: The original plan for my spiffy new Eee PC netbook was to dump my email archives on it, but the bundled email client for most Ubuntu-based Linux distributions is Evolution, an app I’ve never tried before.

Cray sells Opteron-Linux super to Swiss boffins

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: The Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) in Lugano has coughed up some serious Swiss francs to buy a Cray 141.6 teraflops XT5 system, dubbed Monte Rosa.

Linux Action Show - 3 Years Old

Filed under
Linux

StormOS Enters Beta

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: A beta version of StormOS has emerged, which is a desktop distribution that is based upon the Nexenta Core Platform that in turn is derived from OpenSolaris but with an Ubuntu user-land.

building brand together

Filed under
KDE
OSS

aseigo.blogspot: There are many reasons given for desktop Linux not "taking off". Some are accurate, others considerably less so. One of the challenges we face with KDE is creating a meaningful, visible brand that people value and relate to on an emotional level.

No. 2 IT distributor: No Linux netbooks for you

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: Netbook shipments are up "in the triple-digit percentiles" over a year ago, said Brian Davis, vice-president of client systems for Tech Data. But he said Tech Data has seen "almost no" demand for Linux netbooks.

Linux Makes the Grade in California Schools

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: A few growing pains aside, a Linux deployment in a Santa Rosa, CA elementary school district is maturing robustly, letting teachers and students stand apart from their previous dependence on Microsoft Windows while they try on new open software attitudes.

AbiWord - the underestimated word processor

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: When someone tells you to name a word processor, you'll most likely say Microsoft Word, maybe OpenOffice Write, seldom WordPerfect, but almost never AbiWord.

Windows 7 vs. Linux: Beyond Thunderdome

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

pcworld.com: "Listen all! This is the truth of it. Fighting leads to killing, and killing gets to warring. And that was damn near the death of us all. Look at us now! Busted up, and everyone talking about hard rain! But we've learned, by the dust of them all... Bartertown learned. Now, when OSes get to fighting, it happens here! And it finishes here! Two OSes enter; one OS leaves."

OpenSolaris Still Shines

Filed under
OS

informationweek.com/blog: With all the gloom-and-doom about Sun in the air, it almost went unnoticed that they have a new rev of OpenSolaris out in the wild. I took a quick end-user-experience peek.

More powerful Python testing techniques

Filed under
Linux

Python testing reporting features that let testing support more and more powerful techniques

Studio Dave Tests Ubuntu Studio 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxjournal.com: I need at least one i386 installation here at Studio Dave because some production software is not yet 64-bit ready, and I happen to need that software. Thus began my most recent series of trials and tribulations with Ubuntu.

Happy Birthday, Mozilla - and Thanks for Being Here

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Seven years ago, Mozilla 1.0 was launched. The Mozilla project was originally a browser *suite*, which included an email reader and a chat client as well as a browser.

Chrome on Linux: Rough, fast & promising

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I'd been waiting for Chrome on Linux since Chrome first showed up. Chrome, if you haven't tried it, is the speed-demon of Web browsers. I love it. But, until now, there really wasn't a version that would run natively on Linux.

GIMP Animation Package 2.6.0 Released

Filed under
GIMP

GAP 2.6.0 is a stable release of the video menu intended for use with the GIMP 2.6.x series. This release contains updates for video encoding/decoding, undo support for the storyboard feature and fixes for better compatibility with the GIMP 2.6.x releases.

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More in Tux Machines

Making GNOME Look Like Apple's Operating System

  • A macOS Mojave Inspired GTK Theme Appears
    A new GTK theme brings the luscious look of macOS Mojave to the Linux desktop. Not that you should be surprised; we’ve written before about how easy it is to make Ubuntu look like a Mac. But thanks to this new macOS Mojave inspired GTK theme that fact is truer, and more faithful, than ever.
  • Make Ubuntu Look Like macOS Mojave’s Dark Mode
    If you’re a Linux user who likes the look of the dark mode coming in macOS Mojave, you’re in luck: there’s a GTK theme just for you. The theme is available on Gnome-Look.org alongside several other macOS inspired themes. You’re looking for the one titled McOS-MJV-Dark-mode, but feel free to download more if you think you might want to switch it up later. Installing is a little tricky: you need to create a .themes directory in your home folder, then extract the folder in the downloaded archive into that folder. Next you need to install Gnome Tweaks in the Ubuntu Software Store, which you can use to change the theme. You can also use Gnome Tweaks to move the buttons to the left side of the window, where they belong. Fight me.

Android Leftovers

Servers With GNU/Linux

  • Linux Foundation Shifts Network Infrastructure to Kubernetes
    The Linux Networking Fund (LNF) is making significant progress toward embracing Kubernetes as a platform for delivering a range of networking services that are expected to be widely embraced by telecommunications carriers and cloud service providers (CSP). Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking an orchestration for The Linux Foundation, says the latest Beijing release of the Open Networking Automation Platform (ONAP) contains several modules that have been ported to Kubernetes, with more to follow once the Casablanca release of ONAP is released.
  • A Platform Of A Certain Age And Respectability
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  • Uptycs Raises $13M, Launches Osquery-Based Security Platform
    No. 2 is the growing popularity of Mac and Linux-based infrastructure. Traditional enterprise workloads are deployed on Windows, so that’s where malicious activity historically occurred. But now more companies are using Mac infrastructure and transitioning new workloads to Linux in the cloud. Companies need to monitor and secure these environments as well, and Uptycs’ security platform covers all of the above.
  • CeBIT 2018: Huawei to roll-out KunLun V5 server
    Huawei is set to launch the latest server in its KunLun mission critical range with the V5, teaming up once more with Suse, further confirming that the company’s Linux Enterprise Server system is its preferred standard for the range.
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    The idea behind containers has been around since the 1970s, when the technology was first used to isolate application code on Unix systems. However, the use of containers only became widespread in 2013 with the advent of Docker, and container orchestration tools like Kubernetes are even newer than that.

A look at Lutris – Open Gaming Platform for GNU/Linux

Lutris is quite the handy application I’ve discovered, that helps with organization and installation of games on GNU/Linux, even if they come from multiple sources. One of the project's goals is to support any game that runs on Linux regardless of whether it runs natively, through Wine, or other means. The main appeal of Lutris is that it provides an interface to manage all games installed on the machine regardless of source. While it is necessary to integrate the games in the application first, doing so is not super complicated. You may add local games right away by selecting them from the local system or visit the Lutris website to add games this way. Lutris simplifies nearly everything. Users can visit the list of support games on the Lutris website, choose to download and install the game (Note: If its a game that must be bought, you must own it first.) The website lists supported games and where you can acquire or download them. You can use filters on the site to display only free games, games of a genre, or use the built-in search to find games of interest quickly using it. Read more