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Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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20+ Firefox Plugins to Enhance Your YouTube Experience

Filed under
Moz/FF

mashable.com: There is no arguing that YouTube is the most popular video sharing site out there, but that isn’t to say that there aren’t things about it that annoy users. There are a wide array of plugins for Firefox to make the YouTube user experience that much better. Here are over 20.

Also: Trick Out Your Firefox Browser with Style

MSI GeForce 9800GT 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: For Linux desktop users interested in a mid-range discrete graphics card there are more choices than ever before with NVIDIA continuing to release new stable Linux drivers as they have done for many years. We recently looked at AMD's new ATI Radeon HD 4830 mid-range graphics card, but in this article we are comparing it to the NVIDIA GeForce 9800GT.

OSS Reloaded

Filed under
Software

yatsite.blogspot: 2008 was without doubt a very exciting year. Open Source keeps stirring the still waters of IT industry. So, let's see which major applications made major releases this year:

Business vs. FOSS: Six Pressure Points

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: The question of whether business can co-exist with free and open source software (FOSS) was settled long ago. It can, and not only successful companies like Red Hat but also the willingness of venture capitalists to fund FOSS business models proves the case.

The Microsoft-Novell Linux deal: Two years later

Filed under
SUSE

infoworld.com: Two years ago this month, Microsoft forged its controversial partnership with Novell that, among other things, had the two companies agreeing not to sue each other over intellectual property issues, in part to protect Suse Linux users over any patent litigation from Microsoft. Just how well has that deal worked out?

The Linux Licensing Labyrinth

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: The land of open source software is awash in an often confusing array of various licenses and rules regarding what is and is not allowed once someone has written a piece of code. It's enough to scare some vendors away from FOSS altogether.

First Experience of Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux

cikguafiq.blogspot: I am not the most experienced of Linux users, deep down a am a Windows fanboy. However I have an old laptop that is generally useless with anything other than browsing the Internet or doing some basic work. It was never going to be a gaming machine so I figured Linux offers everything I need + it should perform better than XP.

Setting Up ProFTPd + TLS On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

FTP is a very insecure protocol because all passwords and all data are transferred in clear text. By using TLS, the whole communication can be encrypted, thus making FTP much more secure. This article explains how to set up ProFTPd with TLS on an Ubuntu 8.10 server.

Linux: for all things great and small

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Most of us get a chance to see Linux in action at the desktop or single server level. Some of us use Linux on mobiles and other little gizmos without even realising that the penguin is doing the lifting.

Zenwalking

Filed under
Linux

shinywankenobi.wordpress: I’ve tried just about every Linux distro you could mention over the years. In my partial boredom I decided to flip through Distrowatch’s pages and see what I could find to play with. I want something different. Zenwalk… Zenwalk, where the Hell have you been all my life?

Review: Opera Mini 4.2 Beta

Filed under
Software

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: USING a mobile phone to access the worldwide web has rarely been a pleasant experience. But then along came Oslo-based Opera with their Mini 4.2 browser - and all that changed.

Blown Away by Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

homecomputerguide.com: I’ve been working on Windows computers for nearly two decades and have never been compelled to use anything else. But a recent experience with something called Linux Ubuntu has turned my computer world view on its head!

How to use OpenOffice.org as a Two Pane Outliner

Filed under
HowTos

So, although OpenOffice.org does not act as a one pane outliner, we can set it up as a two pane outliner. This can be very useful for structuring long documents, or keeping scraps of disparate information in one handy file.

To do this requires two things: the use of the Navigator, and the use of headline styles when structuring your document. Let’s start up OpenOffice.org Writer and see how this works.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gartner: 85 percent of companies using open source

  • Kontact and Citadel - experiences
  • USB 3.0 debuts
  • How “why” is the most important question open source vendors should ask
  • Clueless Linux User
  • British Council using Drupal
  • Norway Pledges Funds for Government Open Source Usage
  • The importance of open source, from a 17 year olds point of view
  • Linuxhater, failed astroturfer?
  • Cloud Apps, Netbooks and the Mobile Internet: Flash, Bang, Fizzle
  • What if Sun fails with open source?
  • Testing Mandriva
  • Using Ubuntu Linux at the American International School
  • Slumberland rests easy after move away from proprietary Unix
  • kerneloops.org records its 100,000th oops
  • Running Linux and z/OS on a single mainframe poses no problem
  • How to see when you should not upgrade
  • Kernel Log: New graphics drivers and Linux versions: Dom0 patches for 2.6.29?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting Gnome Volume Manager to Play Nice

  • Crafting offers and invoice documents with Kraft
  • Find all SSH Hosts
  • Setting Up Parental Controls in Ubuntu
  • Easier file renaming with renameutils
  • Improve Your Intelligence with Brain Workshop
  • Add windows codecs to Ubuntu Intrepid 8.10

Coherence brings UPnP to GNOME

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Coherence is a Python library that implements UPnP and the Digital Living Network Alliance standard, protocols that facilitate interoperability between networked media devices.

Unemployed? Five reasons to build your resume with FOSS contributions

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: It looks like we’ve gone from speculating whether we’re headed into recession depression. Yihong Ding, over on the Thinking Space blog,predicts that we’ll have a “Golden Age” of the Web. If that’s the case, shouldn’t we be expecting a “Golden Age” for open source, with all the idle programmers and IT folks at home with time on their hands?

Review of StarOffice 9

Filed under
Software

linuxloop.com: For several weeks now I have been testing an early copy of StarOffice 9, Sun’s commercial alternative of OpenOffice.org. Finally, today, I can tell you about it.

On a Blender Bender

Filed under
Software

kdubois.net: So being interested in all things 3d, I finally sat down and started learning Blender. The inability of me to make acceptable looking 3d models has long been a hole in my 3d graphics knowledge, but no more!

Another day, another Microsoft lie

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.computerworld.com: You can count on Microsoft pulling the fake research report trick at least once a year. This time around it’s a study by ClickStream Technologies, which found Microsoft Office, to be far more popular than OpenOffice.org, which in turn was far more popular than Google Docs.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • 20 Years of LWN
    Back in mid-1997, your editor (Jonathan Corbet) and Liz Coolbaugh were engaged in a long-running discussion on how to trade our nice, stable, reliably paying jobs for a life of uncertainty, poverty, and around-the-clock work. Not that we thought of it in those terms, naturally. We eventually settled on joining Red Hat's nascent "support partner" program; while we were waiting for it to get started, we decided to start a weekly newsletter as a side project — not big and professional like the real press — to establish ourselves in the community. Thus began an amazing journey that has just completed its 20th year. After some time thinking about what we wanted to do and arguing about formats, we published our first edition on January 22, 1998. It covered a number of topics, including the devfs controversy, the pesky 2GB file-size limit on the ext2 filesystem, the use of Linux on Alpha to render scenes in the film "Titanic", the fact that Red Hat had finally hired a full-time quality-assurance person and launched the Red Hat Advanced Development Labs, and more. We got almost no feedback on this issue, though, perhaps because we didn't tell anybody that we had created it.
  •  
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.4 | Ubuntu 17.10 Revisited
    Canonical revised Ubuntu 17.10 with the new 17.10.1. Time to take another look…
  • PodCTL #22 – Highway to Helm
    One of the reasons that Kubernetes has gained so much traction in the marketplace is because it is flexible enough to allow innovation to happen all around the core APIs. One area where that has happened is in application package management, specifically with the Helm project.
  • LibreELEC Linux OS Will Get Meltdown and Spectre Patches with Next Major Release
    The development team behind the Kodi-based LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) open-source HTPC operating system for embedded systems and PCs released LibreELEC 8.2.3. LibreELEC 8.2.3 is the third maintenance update to the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series of the Just enough Operating System (JeOS), which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center. It's here a month after the LibreELEC 8.2.2 point release to address a few issues.
  • openSUSE 42.2 to Reach End-of-Life This Week
    The minor release of openSUSE Leap 42.2 will reach its End-of-Life (EOL) this week on Jan. 26. The EOL phase ends the updates to the operating system, and those who continue to use EOL versions will be exposed to vulnerabilities because these discontinued versions no longer receive security and maintenance updates; this is why users need to upgrade to the newer minor; openSUSE Leap 42.3. “We are very pleased with the reliability, performance and longevity of Leap,” said openSUSE member Marcus Meissner. “Both the openSUSE community and SUSE engineers have done a fantastic job with security and maintenance of the Leap 42 distribution; users can be confident that their openSUSE operating system is, and will continue to be, receiving bug fixes and maintenance updates until its End-of-Life.”
  • French Gender-Neutral Translation for Roundcube
    Here's a quick blog post to tell the world I'm now doing a French gender-neutral translation for Roundcube.
  •  
  • This Oil Major Has a Supercomputer the Size of a Soccer Field
    Big Oil is now Big Tech. So big, in fact, that Eni SpA’s new supercomputer is the size of a soccer field. In the multimillion-dollar pursuit of the world’s most powerful computers, the Italian explorer says it’s taken the lead. Its new machine, located outside Milan, will scan for oil and gas reservoirs deep below the Earth over thousands of miles. “This is where the company’s heart is, where we hold our most delicate data and proprietary technology,” Eni Chief Executive Officer Claudio Descalzi said in an interview on Thursday.

Compilers and CLI: LLVM, GCC and Bash

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, Krita Interview, GNOME Builder

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.

KDE/GNOME: Usability and Productivity, K

  • This week in Usability and Productivity, part 2
    This is your weekly status update for the KDE community’s progress in the Usability and Productivity initiative. KDE contributors have been busy, and here’s a sampling of features, improvements, and bugfixes relevant to the initiative that KDE developers landed over the past week-and-a-half...
  • Interview with Baukje Jagersma
    How and when did you get to try digital painting for the first time? Probably when I first discovered Deviantart. I was already familiar with GIMP, which I used to create photo-manipulations with. But seeing all the amazingly talented artists on there made me want to try out digital painting for myself.
  • Builder happenings for January
    I’ve been very busy with Builder since returning from the holidays. As mentioned previously, we’ve moved to gitlab. I’m very happy about it. I can see how this is going to improve the engagement and communication between our existing community and help us keep new contributors. I made two releases of Builder so far this month. That included both a new stable build (which flatpak users are already using) and a new snapshot for those on developer operating systems like Fedora Rawhide.