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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android ski goggles offer augmented reality display Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 9:20pm
Story Photoshop competitor Krita is a true creative tool -- and it's free and open source Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 9:09pm
Story First peek at the next Ubuntu 15.04 nester line-up Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 9:03pm
Story Review: Simplicity Linux 15.4 alpha Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 8:43pm
Story Eurostat continues to share and use open source Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 8:29pm
Story Excellent: Android Ecosystem is Low-Margin, Fragmenting Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 8:18pm
Story Open source empowers Sintra health centre Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 2:38pm
Story Pearl OS Could Be a Gem in the Making Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 2:15pm
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of LXLE Rianne Schestowitz 02/03/2015 - 2:12pm
Story XFCE 4.12 Released With Several Changes, Install In Ubuntu Mohd Sohail 02/03/2015 - 6:33am

The GNU/Linux Desktop: Nine Myths

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Nobody questions whether Mac OS X is ready for the desktop. With GNU/Linux, however, the story is different. For over a decade, columnists and bloggers have been explaining how GNU/Linux isn't ready for the desktop -- and, despite all the progress in the operating system over the last ten years, the arguments haven't changed much.

Testing Linux Distributions in VMWare and Parallels

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: A long time ago I used to actually use a separate computer to install and test Linux distributions. I even built some of the boxes that I used to do the testing. These days I use VMWare and Parallels to run Linux on my Macs. Why?

Readers’ Choice: Awesome Linux Apps that Need Our Attention

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: I got some very interesting comments on my post about Linux projects that need more attention, so I decided to feature a few of the readers’ recommendations.

BackupPC - A handy Linux backup tool

Filed under
Software

techtarget.com: Backing up Linux machines can be challenging, especially for storage/backup administrators who are used to working primarily with Windows.

Cloudera Floats Linux Distro for Cloud Computing

Filed under
Linux

newsfactor.com: Cloudera is releasing a Linux distro for Hadoop, the cloud-computing technology behind Facebook, Google and others. Cloudera's Hadoop is aimed at regular enterprise data centers.

How does Ubuntu's Upstart system initialization compare with runit?

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Vincent Danen takes a look at Ubuntu’s Upstart system, which is an event-based replacement for SysV init that handles the starting of tasks and services during boot.

Designing Firefox 3.2

Filed under
Moz/FF

informationarchitects.jp: In January 2000, T-Online asked us what we’d do if we could design a browser from scratch. Our answer was “Tabs”. Eight years later Aza Raskin, head of user experience at Mozilla, asked me what I think a new tab should look like. The answer after days of mailing back and forth: “Forget tabs!”

Firefox 3.1 Beta 3 - Superb is too modest

Filed under
Moz/FF

dedoimedo.com: Firefox is my favorite browser. It is fast, stable and extensible. It is also quite safe. And it looks good, too. Finally, you may also have heard that Firefox 3.1, the latest version of this phenomenal browser is coming out soon.

Mandriva 2009.1 RC1 Screenshot Tour

Filed under
MDV

news.softpedia.com: On March 10th, Mandriva announced the immediate availability of Mandriva Linux 2009.1 RC1. Though a bit late, we thought it would be nice to please some of our readers and offer them a visual tour of this first release candidate.

Arch Linux - a distro collector’s pick

Filed under
Linux

polishlinux.org: Are you tired of frequent seeking or all these mega-piles of CDs constantly growing on your desktop? Is there any place left out there? Do you really need to wait another six months to update your software or get the feature you expect?

10 Linux and open source developer tools you should not overlook

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: To take advantage of the excellent Linux development environment, you need to have the right tools. Here’s a rundown of some of the best ones out there and the features they have to offer.

Mozilla says next Firefox likely months away

Filed under
Moz/FF

news.cnet.com: Mozilla had planned to release its new "Shiretoko" version of Firefox in early 2009, but with the scale of changes made to the open-source browser, a date halfway through the year now looks more realistic.

Why glxgears is slower with Kernel Modesetting (and why it doesn't matter)

Filed under
Linux

qa-rockstar.livejournal: One interesting fact came out of yesterday's Intel KMS Test Day. Everyone noticed that glxgears is much slower under KMS/DRI2 than it was before (e.g. in Fedora 9 or 10)

Get it done with GNOME Do 0.8.1

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: GNOME Do is an open source launcher utility for the Linux desktop. Its new dock interface combines Mac-like polish and usability with highly efficient keyboard control, and we put it through its paces.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.29 - Part 7:

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: On Thursday night, Linus Torvalds released an eighth pre-release version of Linux 2.6.29 and hinted that this could be the final 2.6.29 release candidate. "What's coming in 2.6.29" series with an overview of driver news from a range of areas.

WattOS Mini-Review

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: My first thought here's yet another Ubuntu dirivitive how many more can there be? Then wait a minute what's this?

the best Linux newsreaders

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: Ah, Usenet newsgroups… Online communication and file sharing for the masses, still equal today to what it was before the advent of blogs, instant messaging and P2P networks.

File-System Benchmarks On The Intel X25-E SSD

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Late last month we looked at the Intel X25-E Extreme SSD on Linux. We ran this high-performance solid-state drive within a System76 Serval Notebook and compared its performance to a Seagate Momentus 7200.2 SATA HDD.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 294

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tutorial: Installing Linux with Logical Volume Management

  • News: Slackware switches to KDE 4, Ubuntu packages Plymouth, openSUSE resurrects broken download server, Debian overviews 'Squeeze', Tiny Core reveals 10 MB desktop distro, best window managers of 2000
  • Released last week: PCLinuxOS 2009.1, Tiny Core Linux 1.2
  • Upcoming releases: OpenBSD 4.5 pre-orders, Frugalware Linux 1.0
  • New additions: moonOS
  • New distributions: ARAnyM/AFROS Live CD, FuguIta, Jarro Negro Linux, Livre S.O.
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Change is a hard thing to do

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: Changing from closed source programs to open source programs is a hard thing to do. Many people will resist that change fiercely and will pull every trick out of the book to justify their objections to that change.

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Managing an open source project is challenging work, and the challenges grow as a project grows. Eventually, a project may need to meet different requirements and span multiple repositories. These problems aren't technical, but they are important to solve to scale a technical project. Business process management methodologies such as agile and kanban bring a method to the madness. Developers and managers can make realistic decisions for estimating deadlines and team bandwidth with an organized development focus. Read more

How will the GDPR impact open source communities?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) was approved by the EU Parliament on April 14, 2016, and will be enforced beginning May 25, 2018. The GDPR replaces the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC which was designed "to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, to protect and empower all EU citizens data privacy and to reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy." The aim of the GDPR is to protect the personal data of individuals in the EU in an increasingly data-driven world. Read more

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!