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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Stable kernel 2.6.20.3 Released

Filed under
Linux

Greg K-H and the -stable team have released Linux Kernel 2.6.20.3. No earth shattering bugs in this one, just the usual round of cleanup.

More Here and Here.

Gentoo fights flamewars and bad behaviour!

Filed under
Gentoo

Triggered by recent examples of bad behavior and dissatisfaction among developers and users alike, the Gentoo Council has drafted a new Code of Conduct that will be enforced for both developers and users.

Songbird -Impressive Media Player For Linux and Windows

Filed under
Reviews

I like listening most of my music on Ipod or my phone , i use laptop mainly for browsing Internet , programming and some other casual work .

Blazing Fast NICs for Linux

Filed under
Hardware

NetXen, a maker of hardware-accelerated 10GbE (10-Gigabit Ethernet) LAN cards, has just introduced a set of software drivers for Linux systems. The company claims that with this hardware/software combo users should see great network performance without incurring increased host CPU overhead.

A dozen tips for testing free software

Filed under
HowTos

One of the best ways you can participate in the free and open source software (FOSS) revolution is by helping to test software and reporting bugs and issues to project developers to help them improve their code. Even in the wild and woolly, sometimes undisciplined approach to development that we see in FOSS projects, there are ways to test more effectively.

Scheduling tasks with cron

Filed under
HowTos

When you want to run a particular task repeatedly, or run it at a scheduled time, Linux and other Unix-like operating systems offer you an easy way to do this and plenty more. It’s called cron and it’s a multi-purpose task scheduler on steroids. It’s installed and enabled on virtually every Unix-like OS out there by default.

Two vulnerabilities in KDE BitTorrent client KTorrent

Filed under
Security

Version 2.1.2 of the open-source BitTorrent client KTorrent for KDE removes two vulnerabilities. The first one is said to enable an attacker to cause the application to crash. According to the bug report by Ubuntu the vulnerability also allows code to be injected onto a system and executed. The vulnerability is found in the module chunkcounter.cpp and is triggered by large idx values.

SUSE security: Forgotten passwords, AppArmor

Filed under
HowTos

Take advantage of the added protection that firewalls, anti-virus and anti-spyware programs offer, says James Turnbull. The author of Hardening Linux warns that, while the incidence of viruses and spyware on Linux are considerably smaller than on Windows-based platforms, they can still occur.

UPDATED: Guide to Ripping Internet Radio to MP3 on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Back in December, I wrote a guide on Streamtuner/Streamripper in Linux. If you are unfamiliar with this concept, I suggest you read that post first. In this guide, I will be using the Amarok-like media manager for Gnome, Exaile.

Dell polls PC users on favorite Linux varieties

Filed under
Linux

Dell began polling customers about their software preferences on Tuesday as part of an effort by the struggling PC vendor to meet a popular request for desktops and notebooks that run on Linux instead of Windows.

Linux Starts to Find Home on Desktops

Filed under
Linux

The Linux operating system, having made inroads into corporations' backroom server computers, is showing hints of inching into a much broader market: employees' personal computers.

The much-hyped notion that Linux would be viable software to run desktop and notebook PCs seemed dead on arrival a few years ago. But the idea is showing some new vital signs.

How to hide an entire filesystem

Filed under
HowTos

Simple file encryption is useful, but sometimes it's more useful to encrypt a complete filesystem or disk, such as when you need to protect a large set of files. Or you may need not only to protect, but to completely hide the presence of sensitive data from prying eyes. For these cases, here are several options for securing your systems.

Linspire and Ubuntu team up agains MS

Filed under
Linux

This partnership will see Linspire base Linspire/Freespire on Ubuntu, while Canonical will in turn use Linspire's CNR commercial software e-commerce technology. Both companies believe that they will benefit in this partnership by promoting the adoption of Linux in the Microsoft dominated desktop market.

Setting up NX Terminal Server on Ubuntu

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HowTos

I have setup a remote desktop to allow her to connect to and use, thus confining the greater bandwidth usage to our unlimited broadband connection in Blightey so she gets a speedier desktop experience via dialup whilst only consuming the small bandwidth needed to receive the remote desktop itself. The solution I’ve chose is NX server.

The setup routine (in order)went like this:

Ubuntu Refuses to Ship Me CDs

Filed under
Ubuntu

In a very very strange turn of events, Canonical has refused to ship me CDs of its Linux distribution, Ubuntu.

The Web smiley's motto: Grin and bear it

Filed under
Web

Author Vladimir Nabokov said in a 1969 New York Times interview that "there should exist a special typographical sign for a smile--some sort of concave mark, a supine round bracket."

Linux for Beginners

Filed under
Linux

Linux is getting hotter and more mainstream all the time—enough so that even IT administrators who deal primarily with Windows would do well to get their feet wet with Linux.

Back to school - tuXlab reviewed

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

tuXlabs is a freely distributed educational software package running on a specialised Ubuntu derivative which has been rolled out to schools across South Africa and serves over 160 000 learners. Tectonic has covered various stories on it in the past and it seemed about time to give it a try.

The time for revolution has come

Filed under
Linux

We are at a cusp in computing history. This time is now a delicate balancing point where the future of computing can go one way or another. It is also obvious that one party stands to lose a great deal while another stands to win a great deal. Ironically the party that stands to lose the most is the one who has brought this turning point into reality.

Eugenia: Ubuntu installed on the Inspiron 640m

Filed under
Ubuntu

Only a few hours after playing with Vista, I resized that partition (Vista now has a “shrink” utility) to 60 MBs and left 40 MBs free for Ubuntu (the rest 20 GBs are reserved by DELL as a recovery partition).

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenVZ 7.0 Becomes A Complete Linux Distribution, Based On VzLinux
    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release. OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.
  • OpenVZ 7.0 released
    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.
  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals
    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.
  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4
    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.200.2.0
    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version 0.7.200.2.0 is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it. For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right. Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Debian

  • Debian LGBTIQA+
    I have a long overdue blog entry about what happened in recent times. People that follow my tweets did catch some things. Most noteworthy there was the Trans*Inter*Congress in Munich at the start of May. It was an absolute blast. I met so many nice and great people, talked and experienced so many great things there that I'm still having a great motivational push from it every time I think back. It was also the time when I realized that I in fact do have body dysphoria even though I thought I'm fine with my body in general: Being tall is a huge issue for me. Realizing that I have a huge issue (yes, pun intended) with my length was quite relieving, even though it doesn't make it go away. It's something that makes passing and transitioning for me harder. I'm well aware that there are tall women, and that there are dedicated shops for lengthy women, but that's not the only thing that I have trouble with. What bothers me most is what people read into tall people: that they are always someone they can lean on for comfort, that tall people are always considered to be self confident and standing up for themselves (another pun, I know ... my bad).
  • [GSOC] Week 8&9 Report
    This particular week has been tiresome as I did catch a cold ;). I did come back from Cape Town where debconf taking place. My arrival at Montreal was in the middle of the week, so this week is not plenty of news…
  • Debian on Jetson TK1
    I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip.
  • RC bugs 2016/01-29

Android Leftovers