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About Tux Machines

Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Hungary universities move to EuroOffice and ODF Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 4:48pm
Story KDE Plasma 5.3 Beta Arrives With Improved Power Management Features Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 4:31pm
Story SuperX OS Greases the Classic Linux Wheel Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 4:24pm
Story Linux Kernel 4.0 Codenamed ‘Hurr Durr I’m A Sheep’ Released, Install/Upgrade In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 15/04/2015 - 2:20pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 9:25am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 9:25am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 9:24am
Story Docker and Containers Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 9:20am
Story The Linux Setup - Kevin Fenzi, Fedora Infrastructure Leader Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 8:48am
Story Semplice 7.0.1 bugfix release Roy Schestowitz 15/04/2015 - 8:39am

Firefox: Some security tips

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.techrepublic.com: There are several reasons why Firefox is the Web browser of choice for many of us. Providing a safe Web surfing experience is one of the more important ones. I’d like to offer some tips.

Mandriva and its R D projects PR

Filed under
MDV

linux-wizard.net: Last time I talk about the Xtreem OS. As we could see, there were very few communication/PR about this on Mandriva website. This complete lack of communication from Mandriva about theses R&D projects is very strange.

People of openSUSE: Jim Henderson

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: I noticed Jim by his thoughtful replies on openSUSE mail lists and forums. He has ability to listen, understand and answer in the way that correspondent can not only find correct, but also understand, which is seldom found talent.

Overview of Ubuntu in the Highstreet

Filed under
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: I’m constantly vigilant, assesing how much of the general public who are not technically minded use Ubuntu. Here I found an interesting anti-Linux movement forming.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #140

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #140 for the week of April 26th- May 2nd, 2009 is now available.

Jaunty: kernel 2.6.30 fixes the Intel video

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger.org: The Jaunty kernel team should apologize to the whole Universe: the Intel video regression is because of the kernel, and here’s the proof.

Mandriva Cooker (2010.0) opened

Filed under
MDV

artipc10.vub.ac.be: Since Friday the cooker repositories, which will lead to Mandriva 2010.0 in 6 months, are open again. In only 3 days about 400 new package releases were made.

A Taste of Spring: The Mandriva One 2009.1 Experience

Filed under
MDV

zwuser.wordpress: I just got the news last week that Mandriva released their latest and greatest version, 2009.1 a.k.a Spring. For convenience sake, I decided to get the Mandriva One KDE CD image.

Tech Evangelists and open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.techrepublic.com: What I thought I wanted to do was take a look at how tech evangelism really effects the IT industry - especially open source. We have all been evangelists at one point or another, but for some of us, especially in the open source world, being an evangelist is looked upon poorly.

5 Ways to Get Involved with Ubuntu–for Non-technical Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

2indya.com: If you are not a technical user of Linux but want to get involved with the sweeping wave of Linux/GNU operating system, Ubuntu offers you some great opportunities.

The Android name kerfluffle

blogs.zdnet.com: The media is absolutely filled with “oh noes” stories concerning Google, and its partners in the Open Handset Alliance, being sued by Erich Specht of Palatine, Ill over its use of the word Android to describe its mobile phones.

Windows 7 RC1 Review

Filed under
Microsoft

blog.scotsnewsletter.com: I’ve been working with the Windows 7 RC1 (release candidate 1) for about a week and a half now. Barring unforeseen bugs, I doubt at this point that Microsoft is more than four months away from the release of Windows 7.

ReactOS works! Sort of …

Filed under
OS

kmandla.wordpress: On a whim, I installed the latest pre-release release of ReactOS today. I tried it a long time ago and had no luck whatsoever — black screens, nonbooting or just generalized irregular behavior — and so I rarely give it a thought.

Creating A Fully Encrypted Para-Virtualised Xen Guest System Using Debian Lenny

Filed under
HowTos

This document explains how to set up a fully encrypted para-virtualized XEN instance. In this howto, the host system is running Debian Etch, while the guest system to be installed will be using Debian Lenny.

Why Desktop Linux isn't profitable

Filed under
Linux

zerias.blogspot: One of the more popular videos making the tech news rounds is Bryan Lunduke's Linux Sucks! video from LinuxFest NW. He makes several valid points, and covers one of my biggest problems with Open-Source development, the sheer number of duplicated efforts.

The future of PowerDevil (and of power management)

Filed under
KDE

drfav.wordpress: PowerDevil has proven to be quite a solid software, and I’m both proud and happy about it: the 4.2->4.3 transition has happened almost with no maintainance. The problem is that PowerDevil GUI does suck, big time, because it’s way too cluttered.

NoScript and AdBlock Plus Dramas

Filed under
Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: Maybe you’ve already read a bit about the big stink around NoScript? Personally, I find both of these extensions very useful, and have been using both for as long as I have been aware of them. Along with FireGestures, they are the first extensions I always install along with Firefox.

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • KDE 4.2.2 still has a few problems

  • Gnot Invented Here
  • Migrating my home Ubuntu Server toward a linutop
  • GNU sed goes GPL3
  • Sometimes I Hate Gentoo
  • How Well Does Computer Humor Age?
  • FLOSS Weekly 67: Xen
  • QuakeLive Linux SITREP
  • Notification Changes For Karmic Koala
  • Using Mew as a Mail Client
  • How to set the date in Linux
  • Translate Your Documentation
  • Ubuntu Tip:Linking Music Across Operating Systems
  • How to securely clean up data on a hard disk on Linux
  • Installing Ubuntu without external media
  • How to Block AIM’s Annoying ‘AOL System Msg’ in Pidgin
  • The Best Virtual Drive For Linux
  • Insert the Last Argument of the Last Command
  • How to get Chromium daily builds in Ubuntu

openSUSE 11.1 Impressions

Filed under
SUSE

wlnelson.blogspot: I've never been a big fan of SuSE/openSUSE in the past. It's always felt like a mixed bag to me. Due to some coursework I need to perform for my university I felt I was best served by a distribution that has a very large package repository.

Migration to Mepis 8.0 Complete

Filed under
Linux

muskratsweb.net: Mepis 8.0 is working out just fine. I finally got VLC to play my media files, although Kaffiene and mplayer still just show a blue screen. I am now using Mepis as my fulltime/main desktop on my laptop.

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today's leftovers

  • S11E12 – Twelve Years a Slave
    It’s Season 11 Episode 12 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • Porting guide from Qt 1.0 to 5.11
    We do try to keep breakages to a minimum, even in the major releases, but the changes do add up. This raises the question: How hard would it be to port a Qt application from Qt 1.0 to 5.11?
  • Thunderbolt Networking on Linux
    Thunderbolt allows for peer-to-peer network connections by connecting two computers directly via a thunderbolt cable. Mika from Intel added support for this to the 4.15 kernel. Recently, Thomas Haller from NetworkManager and I worked together to figure out what needs to be done in userspace to make it work. As it turns out, it was not that hard and the pull-request was merged swiftly.
  • What’s new in openSUSE Leap 15 – part 1
    openSUSE Leap 15 will be released on the 25th of May 2018! A new openSUSE release is always an exciting event. This means that I get to play with all kinds of new and improved software packages. I am aware that I can simply install openSUSE Tumbleweed and have a new release 4 or 5 times a week. But when using openSUSE Tumbleweed some time ago, I noticed that I was installing Gigabytes of new software packages multiple times per week. The reason for that is that I have the complete opposite of a minimum install. I always install a lot of applications to play / experiment with (including a lot of open source games). I am using openSUSE since 2009 and it covers all of my needs and then some. I am already happy with the available software, so there is no real reason for me to move with the speed of a rolling release. Therefore I prefer to move with the slower pace of the Leap releases.
  • GNOME Terminal: a little something for Fedora 29
    Can you spot what that is?
  • UBports To Work On Unity 8 / Mir / Wayland After OTA-4
    The UBports team have put out their latest batch of answers to common questions around this project that's still working to maintain the Ubuntu Touch software stack. Among the project's recent work has included getting QtWebEngine working on Mir and before their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS based release they still need to figure out Chromium crashes and to resolve that as well as updating the browser. For their first release of UBports derived from Ubuntu 16.04 "Xenial" they are still going to rely upon Oxide while later on should migrate to a new browser.
  • 8 Best App Locks For Android To Secure Your Device In 2018
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 39
  • What's Coming in OpenStack Rocky?
    The OpenStack Rocky release is currently scheduled to become generally available on August 30th, and it's expected to add a host of new and enhanced capabilities to the open-source cloud platform. At the OpenStack Summit here, Anne Bertucio, marketing manager at the OpenStack Foundation, and Pete Chadwick, director of product management at SUSE, outlined some of the features currently on the Rocky roadmap. Bertucio began the session by warning the audience that the roadmap is not prescriptive, but rather is intended to provide a general idea of the direction the next OpenStack release is taking.
  • PostgreSQL 11 Is Continuing With More Performance Improvements, JIT'ing
    PostgreSQL 11 is the next major feature release of this open-source database SQL server due out later in 2018. While it's not out yet, their release notes were recently updated for providing an overview of what's coming as part of this next major update. To little surprise, performance improvements remain a big focus for PostgreSQL 11 with various optimizations as well as continued parallelization work and also the recently introduced just-in-time (JIT) compilation support.
  • Tidelift Secures $15M in Series A Funding
    Tidelift, a Boston, MA-based open source software startup, secured $15m in Series A funding.
  • Tesla disclosed some of its autopilot source code after GPL violation
    Tesla, a technology company, and the independent automaker are well known for offering the safest, quickest electric cars. The company uses a lot of open source software to build its operating system and features, such as Linux Kernel, Buildroot, Busybox, QT, etc also they have always been taciturn about the finer details and tech of its popular artefacts, such as Model S, Model X, but now Elon Musk’s company has just released some of its automotive tech source code into the open source community.
  • Open Source Underwater Distributed Sensor Network
    One way to design an underwater monitoring device is to take inspiration from nature and emulate an underwater creature. [Michael Barton-Sweeney] is making devices in the shape of, and functioning somewhat like, clams for his open source underwater distributed sensor network.
  • Security Researchers Discover Two New Variants of the Spectre Vulnerability
  • Security updates for Thursday

today's howtos

Games and Wine: Hacknet - Deluxe, Full Metal Furies and More