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Tuesday, 28 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Herd 3 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Herd 3 is now available for download. New in this third alpha release of 7.04 Feisty Fawn is GNOME 2.17.90 and numerous other updated packages. For Ubuntu fanatics this is certainly worth trying out.

Those Screenshots

MythTV Installation Guide for Debian

Filed under
HowTos

This was the first time that I used the Debian Installer to install linux. I am impressed, it was able to find all of my hardware and configure it all appropriately. I am pleased to see this since this has always been a downfall of debian distro. I am going to record the events so that if anyone else can use this information it is available. I am also going to try and record the installation process for installing Mythtv for debian.

Arsgeek’s guide to installing Beryl with Avant in Ubuntu on an Intel i915 chip

Filed under
HowTos

Here’s a soup to nuts guide on getting beryl with aiglx up and running on your computer if you have an Intel i915 onboard graphics chip. Once you’ve got Beryl installed we’ll add the Avant window navigator as well. With props to the Beryl Project and FunnyLookinHat.

The story of RPM

Filed under
Software

It’s hard to imagine that you don’t know the story of RPM, the package manager that is the core of so much of Red Hat’s Linux experience. From a beginner’s first installation to the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) developer’s latest Fedora release, RPM is inherently part of the Linux user interaction. But what happens when a core piece of software suffers from politics and agendas, cruft, and bad decisions–or no decisions at all?

Enhance security with file encryption tools

Filed under
Software

System-wide security solutions such as SELinux, AppArmor, Bastille and grsecurity can, in most cases, make your Linux desktop more than reasonably secure. But there are still cases where file or directory encryption is necessary. Here are some tools that can help you when you need to move files outside of your home computer, carry personal data around with you on a pendrive, or send email messages containing sensitive information.

Open source network monitoring -- An open alternative

Filed under
OSS

Network monitoring and management applications can be costly and cumbersome, but recently a host of companies have sprung forth offering an open source alternative to IBM Tivoli, HP OpenView, CA and BMC -- and they're starting to gain traction.

The Limits of Skippy

Filed under
Software

It was suggested to try Skippy for an Exposé-like application switcher. It works. But I will not be using it. Skippy doesn't have a reliable way to identify which windows are distinct applications and which are not.

The GPL, EULA and BSD licenses. Who's the target?

Filed under
OSS

There are so many different licenses floating around the computer industry today that it is not funny. To me they all seem to stem from a mixture of three primary licenses. Much like all the colours of the rainbow can be generated from three primary colours.

Linspire Changes to Ubuntu-base

Filed under
Linux

Linspire will immediately transition from Debian to Ubuntu as the base for their Linspire and Freespire operating systems, and Canonical will utilize Linspire's CNR technology for aspects of Ubuntu's software delivery system.

Installing Ubuntu/Kubuntu Dapper Drake on a Single/Multi-Boot RAID System

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide describes how to install Ubuntu (Ubuntu+GNOME) or Kubuntu (Ubuntu+KDE) 6.06.1 LTS (Dapper Drake) on a single or a multi-boot RAID system. It is meant as a variation of Ubuntu Wiki FakeRAID HowTo document, but digested and with minimum commentary. Its goal is to allow new Ubuntu users to complete an entire installation within 30 minutes, almost entirely by copy and paste.

Good old-fashioned shooting with Kobo Deluxe

Filed under
Gaming

If you still dig the old-style arcade games, you owe it to yourself to check out Kobo Deluxe, an improved version of XKobo with sound and better graphics. I ran across Kobo Deluxe when I was looking for a game similar to Namco's arcade classic Bosconian. Your mission? Blow up the fortresses and move on to the next level, to ... blow up more fortresses. OK, so it's not exactly Shakespearean story development, but what do you want from a retro arcade-style game anyway? Right -- fast-paced action and an ever-increasing high score, which Kobo Deluxe delivers in spades.

Discussing Dyne:Bolic and Freedom with Denis Jaromil Rojo

Filed under
Interviews

Denis "Jaromil" Rojo is an artist and a FOSS hacker. He's popularly known for Dyne:Bolic, a Live CD distribution that contains several applications for audio and video manipulation. As a programmer, he is author of several free software that present new possibilities for online radios. As an artist he is known for his netart performances and for crafting the most elegant and efficient 13-character forkbomb ever written.

Richard Stallman on "World Domination 201"

Filed under
OSS

The "World Domination 201" made an impact on some parts of the Free Software community, including myself as I found myself in agreement. However, as I believe in Free Software and hence tend to prioritize the issue of freedom I was interesting in hearing what Richard Stallman, the head of the FSF, has to say about it. So I fired up the following email.

Also: No More Stallman On YouTube, Says No To The Use Of Proprietary Video

How Linux suspend and resume works in the ACPI age & Some Howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Back in the APM days, everything was easy. You called an ioctl on /dev/apm, and the kernel made a BIOS call. After that, it was all up to the hardware. Sure, it never really worked properly, and it was basically impossible to debug what the hardware actually did. And then ACPI came along, and nothing worked at all. Several years later, we're almost back to where we were with APM. But what's actually happening when you hit that sleep key?

Book review: Beginning GIMP - From Novice To Professional

Filed under
Reviews

So, you want a free software image manipulation program? You’ve always wanted to be able to smooth out your own photos? You’ve downloaded the GIMP, but when you open the program to have a go you just get intimidated? You can work out some of it, but you really want to optimise your use, and feel like you aren’t just wandering about in the dark? Where should you turn in this situation? Well your first stop should definitely be Beginning GIMP, From Novice to Professional by Akkana Peck.

Good Bye Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

Yesterday Cijal showed me this (Good Bye MS) site and I was immediately interested in it. Home page just contains one link “Click here to install Debian GNU/Linux”. And I clicked it, and it started downloading few components that can be run from windows, it will modify the boot.ini and when we reboot next time we will see ‘install debian’. It would be a net install (as always). Before rebooting the install gives you can option that we can select completely remove windows and install Debian.

Book Review: Beginning SuSE Linux - 2nd Edition

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Reviews

The book "Beginning SuSE Linux" is authored by Kier Thomas and published by APress. As the name of the book indicates, it is geared towards beginners in GNU/Linux who have set their eyes on trying out the SuSE Linux distribution.

The Pillars of KDE 4: Decibel

Filed under
KDE

The KDE development team is working hard on the KDE 4 platform. KDE 4 will include many exciting new technologies which will greatly enhance the functionality of KDE. One of these new technologies is Decibel. We would like to give you an idea of what Decibel is all about.

Why Having 500+ Distros is a Good Thing

Filed under
Linux

We DO need to keep reinventing Linux and creating distributions that put critical bits in interesting and inventive if unusual places. Without these multiple distributions and their drive to do what isn't "normal" or "business as usual" innovation would be left up to a small number of distros and developers.

X marks the spot for Unix

Filed under
Software

About 30 developers from companies such as Intel, Sun Microsystems and VMware are attending the X.org Developer's Conference in Menlo Park, Calif. this week to ponder the direction of the X Window System.

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More in Tux Machines

Five reasons to switch from Windows to Linux

Linux has been in the ascendancy ever since the open source operating system was released, and has been improved and refined over time so that a typical distribution is now a polished and complete package comprising virtually everything the user needs, whether for a server or personal system. Much of the web runs on Linux, and a great many smartphones, and numerous other systems, from the Raspberry Pi to the most powerful supercomputers. So is it time to switch from Windows to Linux? Here are five reasons why. Read more

today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud