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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu is not Linux. Linux is not Windows. Then, Ubuntu is ...

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spacezone blogs: Penguin Pete told us Ubuntu is not Linux in an infamous post he later deleted. An unrelated article tells you Linux is not Windows. Anyone bad enough at math will conclude a relationship between Ubuntu and Windows and secretly that’s the real subject of both articles.

Top Five Open Source Business Models You Never Heard Of

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itmanagement: In the past, open source revenue has largely been associated with services marketed by many top tier Linux companies: Support, middleware solutions, etc. In contrast, I’ll examine things from a much smaller, more creative perspective.

"Palm OS II" Pushed Back to 2008

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Linux In May of this year, Palm, Inc. announced that it is developing its own operating system that will be based on Linux, but during a recent conference call, CEO Ed Colligan said "Products based on the new Linux-based platform that we're working on, that won't be until some time next year."

Windows XP vs Linux Mint

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Free and Priceless: Today we are going to take a look at installing, and running, both Windows XP and Linux Mint on a Dell Inspiron 6400.

Linus Torvalds on Core 2 Duo Errata: "Totally Insignificant"

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Hardware OpenBSD founder Theo de Raadt publicly denounced Intel’s Core 2 processors on the OpenBSD mailing list. “These processors are buggy as hell, and some of these bugs don’t just cause development/debugging problems, but will *ASSUREDLY* be exploitable from userland code," Raadt said. Linux coordinator and former Transmeta employee Linus Torvalds, thought otherwise.

Ben Goodger of Firefox on how being a very young volunteer in the web world can pan out

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SFGate: Ben Goodger didn't invent Firefox. Nobody did. But he was the lead engineer for the alternative Web browser and as responsible as anyone for naming it. Goodger, 27, is a short-sleeved software engineer at Google in Mountain View.

aKademy 2007: The First Impression

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KDE aKademy 2007 has started! Saturday, the first day of the conference, brought us many talks about various topics, ranging from very technical to more practically oriented. These talks are so content-rich that our coverage of the user conference will require several consecutive articles.

Google OS

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A Blog Of Gentoo: The issue of Google OS is being debated for as long as Google become an important part of internet culture. Many have predicted the appearance of Google's OS long time ago, but the thing never happened. Why?

From Windows to Ubuntu

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technogab: The decision to switch to Ubuntu wasn’t a hard one. After all the problems I was having with Vista, it was a no brainer. My only concern was putting my wife through another OS change. I’ve heard so much about Ubuntu that I just had to give it a try.

The "Mint" interview with Clem Lefebvre

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linuxgeeksunited: I had the opportunity recently to ask the Lead developer and main man of Linux Mint, Clem Lefebvre, a few questions. It turns out that not only is Clem a nice guy and extremely helpful in the Mint forums, but he is funny, creative and a truly good sport.

Linux changes the way you think about operating systems.

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lexlocilinux: This weekend I've been installing Linux on a fifth machine. It's my fourth laptop to work with. I am a big fan of the distribution PCLinuxOS. Unfortunately, this fifth machine, a Compaq Presario F500 has a wifi card that I have not encountered.

Securely remote control your Ubuntu via putty from a windows host (VNC+SSH)

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ubuntuswitch: Last time I had the following situation: I wanted to remote connect to my workstation from another workstation. You have to install SSH and activate the VNC-Server, to be able to securely connect to your server.

AMD applies make-up to the face of its Linux Control Centre

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the inquirer: NINE MONTHS ago I wrote with surprise about how ATI's Linux Mobility drivers "didn't suck" yet how the Control Panel sucked. AMD has surprisingly made my complaints obsolete.

Building a BitTorrent Box

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Nerdica: While most of our time on the Internet is spent IM’ing, e-mail, or just browsing the Web, you may run in to situations when you need to do some powerful file transfers. In this guide, you’ll learn how to set a small headless Ubuntu server used to retrieve BitTorrent files, while even saving them to a external USB hard drive that can be disconnected on the go.

Gentoo UK 2007 Conference

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The Gentoo UK 2007 Conference is going to be held at UCL (University College London), UK on the 14th July. The Gentoo UK conferences are the largest Gentoo-specific conferences that we know about. A wide range of topics will be covered, from clustering to KDE.

Hidden Linux : Lights... Camera... Action!

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PC World blogs: Recordmydesktop is a great little utility to... record your desktop. It's command-line driven but don't let that frighten you. All you have to do is type recor (to let auto-complete do it's magic) and hit to start recording.

Foresight Linux Newsletter (June 2007)

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Welcome to the latest edition of the Foresight Linux Newsletter! This month we bring you a special edition newsletter with a look at Foresight Linux invading BarCamp Chicago (your Editor included), Foresight's founder and lead developer in the news, a look ahead to Foresight Linux 2, as well as a recap of bug fixes, security updates, and contributing to Foresight Linux.

Speed up dynamic linking Using Prelink

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HowTos ELF prelinking utility to speed up dynamic linking.The prelink package contains a utility which modifies ELF shared libraries and executables, so that far fewer relocations need to be resolved at runtime and thus programs come up faster.

The Vista Nightmare Just Turned Into an Ubuntu One

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Ubuntu It’s been 30 days since I made the grave error of upgrading to Vista. Before that day I was a happy Microsoft customer. I’d downloaded Ubuntu a week ago and had tested it on the laptop when I should have tested it on the desktop.

How to find .debs (even if you think they don't exist)

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free software mag: One of the biggest strengths of Debian (and derivatives like Ubuntu) is support for the .deb package. After all, it provides a one-click method of easily installing programs. Best of all, these programs are automatically updated via the official Debian repositories. Unfortunately, the official repositories aren’t always the best.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Rivals Red Hat, Mirantis Announce New OpenStack Partnerships
    The cloud rivals both announce new telco alliances as competition in the cloud market heats up. Red Hat and Mirantis both announced large agreements this week that bring their respective OpenStack technologies to carrier partners. The news comes ahead of the OpenStack Summit that kicks off in Barcelona, Spain, on Oct. 24. Red Hat announced on Oct. 19 that it has a new OpenStack partnership with telco provider Ericsson. "Ericsson and Red Hat recognize that we share a common belief in using open source to transform the telecommunications industry, and we are collaborating to bring more open solutions, from OpenStack-based clouds to software-defined networking and infrastructure, to customers," Radhesh Balakrishnan, general manager of OpenStack at Red Hat, told eWEEK.
  • Turbulent Week Ends, How Did This Stock Fare: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Flatpak; the road to CI/CD for desktop applications?
    In this presentation I will introduce Flatpak and how it changes the software distribution model for Linux. In short it will explain the negatives of using packages, how Flatpak solves this, and how to create your own applications and distribute them for use with Flatpak. This presentation was given at the GNOME 3.22 release party, organized by the Beijing GNOME User Group.
  • The who in the where?
    The job is like many other roles called “Community Manager” or “Community Lead.” That means there is a focus on metrics and experiences. One role is to try ensure smooth forward movement of the project towards its goals. Another role is to serve as a source of information and motivation. Another role is as a liaison between the project and significant downstream and sponsoring organizations. In Fedora, this means I help the Fedora Project Leader. I try to be the yen to his yang, the zig to his zag, or the right hand to his right elbow. In all seriousness, it means that I work on a lot of the non-engineering focused areas of the Fedora Project. While Matthew has responsibility for the project as a whole I try to think about users and contributors and be mechanics of keeping the project running smoothly.

Development News

  • Eclipse Foundation Collaboration Yields Open Source Technology for Computational Science
    The gap between the computational science and open source software communities just got smaller – thanks to a collaboration among national laboratories, universities and industry.
  • PyCon India 2016
    “This is awesome!”, this was my first reaction when I boarded my first flight to Delhi. I was having trouble in finding a proper accommodation Kushal, Sayan and Chandan helped me a lot in that part, I finally got honour of bunking with Sayan , Subho and Rtnpro which I will never forget. So, I landed and directly went to JNU convention center. I met the whole Red Hat intern gang . It was fun to meet them all. I had proposed Pagure for Dev Sprint and I pulled in Vivek to do the same. The dev sprint started and there was no sign of Vivek or Saptak, Saptak is FOSSASIA contributor and Vivek contributes to Pagure with me. Finally it was my turn to talk about Pagure on stage , it was beautiful the experience and the energy. We got a lot of young and new contributors and we tried to guide them and make them send at least one PR. One of them was lucky enough to actually make a PR and it got readily merged.
  • Hack This: An Overdue Python Primer
    In writing the most recent Hack This ("Scrape the Web with Beautiful Soup") I again found myself trapped between the competing causes of blog-brevity and making sure everything is totally clear for non-programmers. It's a tough spot! Recapping every little Python (the default language of Hack This) concept is tiring for everyone, but what's the point in the first place if no one can follow what's going on? This post is then intended then as a sort of in-between edition of Hack This, covering a handful of Python features that are going to recur in pretty much every programming tutorial that we do under the Hack This name. A nice thing about Python is that it makes many things much clearer than is possible in almost any other language.
  • Why I won’t be attending Systems We Love
    Here’s one way to put it: to me, Bryan Cantrill is the opposite of another person I admire in operating systems (whom I will leave unnamed). This person makes me feel excited and welcome and safe to talk about and explore operating systems. I’ve never seen them shame or insult or put down anyone. They enthusiastically and openly talk about learning new systems concepts, even when other people think they should already know them. By doing this, they show others that it’s safe to admit that they don’t know something, which is the first step to learning new things. They are helping create the kind of culture I want in systems programming – the kind of culture promoted by Papers We Love, which Bryan cites as the inspiration for Systems We Love. By contrast, when I’m talking to Bryan I feel afraid, cautious, and fearful. Over the years I worked with Bryan, I watched him shame and insult hundreds of people, in public and in private, over email and in person, in papers and talks. Bryan is no Linus Torvalds – Bryan’s insults are usually subtle, insinuating, and beautifully phrased, whereas Linus’ insults tend towards the crude and direct. Even as you are blushing in shame from what Bryan just said about you, you are also admiring his vocabulary, cadence, and command of classical allusion. When I talked to Bryan about any topic, I felt like I was engaging in combat with a much stronger foe who only wanted to win, not help me learn. I always had the nagging fear that I probably wouldn’t even know how cleverly he had insulted me until hours later. I’m sure other people had more positive experiences with Bryan, but my experience matches that of many others. In summary, Bryan is supporting the status quo of the existing culture of systems programming, which is a culture of combat, humiliation, and domination. [...] He gaily recounts the time he gave a highly critical keynote speech at USENIX, bashfully links to a video praising him at a Papers We Love event, elegantly puts down most of the existing operating systems research community, and does it all while using the words “ancillary,” “verve,” and “quadrennial.” Once you know the underlying structure – a layer cake of vituperation and braggadocio, frosted with eloquence – you can see the same pattern in most of his writing and talks.

Android Leftovers

The basics of open source quality assurance

Open source depends on a sustainable community to develop code rapidly, debug code effectively, and build out new features. Because community involvement is voluntary, people's skills, levels of involvement, and time commitments can vary. Given the variable nature of these factors, along with the fact that open source often relies on a philosophy of "release early, release often," quality assurance can be become challenging. Read more