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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Do Users Want Automatic Updates to Firefox? srlinuxx 16/12/2011 - 6:16am
Story Linux Mint 12 “Lisa”: GNOME, deep in a dream srlinuxx 15/12/2011 - 7:21pm
Story 2011's Tribulations and Triumphs for FOSS srlinuxx 15/12/2011 - 7:16pm
Story Fedora Wins on Samsung Netbooks srlinuxx 15/12/2011 - 7:13pm
Story Assembling Video from a PNG Stream with FFMpeg fsmag 15/12/2011 - 4:58pm
Story Checking Out Ubuntu Studio 11.04 fsmag 15/12/2011 - 4:51pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 4 15/12/2011 - 4:17pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 15/12/2011 - 5:04am
Story Blender 2.61 Released srlinuxx 15/12/2011 - 4:09am
Story Open source is not a dumping ground srlinuxx 1 15/12/2011 - 12:46am

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Use your iPod in Linux

Filed under
Software

pimpyourlinux: Many people have Linux installed on their computers, but they are afraid of using their iPod on it. Perhaps corrupt files, or damage detour them from using the myriad programs that currently exist for the Linux operating system. There is good news.

Creative Commons retires two licenses

Filed under
OSS

LWN: Lawrence Lessig has sent out a message stating that the Creative Commons organization has decided to retire the Developing Nations and Sampling licenses.

Red Hat to assist open source adoption in Indian state

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: Red Hat Inc. is to help the communist government of Kerala, in southwestern India, to deploy open-source software in its e-governance and literacy efforts.

Microsoft's Protection Racket?

Filed under
Microsoft

Forbes: Microsoft should have admitted that Linux matters sooner. For years, the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant seemed to be in denial as the open-source operating software made gains against its Windows franchise. But now a series of deals is finally allowing Microsoft to argue that it's ahead of the curve--with the entertaining upside of making some of the open-source community's truest believers even angrier.

How to add a user to your Ubuntu system the GUI way

Filed under
HowTos

arsgeek: Adding new users to your Ubuntu install is a great way to get your friends and relatives into Linux. They’ll each be able to create a separate Ubuntu experience for themselves by customizing the look and feel of their desktops.

Novell appoints new UK head

Filed under
SUSE

computerweekly: Novell has appointed Jacqueline de Rojas as country manager for the UK and Ireland as it strives to popularise its open source software offering.

Spice up Windows: replace it with Linux; part 1

Filed under
Linux

A Blog Of Gentoo: In my previous post I've stated that I'd like to help people to spice up their system by moving from Windows to Linux. But we all know that it cannot be done in an instant. I will explain step by step how are we going to do this so it will be easy for anyone to follow.

Why I no longer use Kubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Labrador: I decided to install Kubuntu rather than Ubuntu. A first look even more impressed me, it was much better looking. But this was a shortlived experience. My applications crashed a lot especially Open Office and were very slow.

Experiment: first schools install Linux

Filed under
Linux

CNews: An experiment is underway in a number of St. Petersburg schools to install Linux OS in computer rooms with by September 1st. However, it is not clear so far who will be funding the program. A number of computers with Linux OS already appeared in Alexander Ponosov’s school.

Struggling Mandriva attempts to reduce costs

Filed under
MDV

CBR: Franco-Brazilian Linux distributor Mandriva is developing a new strategy designed to reduce cost and focus its attention following the closure of new investment and a poor set of financial results.

BMW bets on Linux, Xen

tectonic: Motor manufacturer BMW Group is using Novell's SuSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLED) and Xen virtualisation software in its data center.

Upload your photos in an instant with Kflickr

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Uploading pictures to Flickr via its Web-based interface is a hassle, particularly if you have dozens of shots to upload. Linux users have a better choice, though, in the form of Kflickr, a simple application for uploading shots to Flickr that will have your family photos online in no time.

Spin your own live CD

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine: A few weeks ago, I promised to explain how to create your own custom live CD with Fedora’s new tools. Well, last week Fedora 7 was launched and all the tools you need are available in the repositories. This even includes a brand new graphical tool, put together by the people at Fedora Unity, called Revisor, which will allow you to spin your own live CD or installation material in an unbelievably user friendly manner.

The Perfect Xen 3.1.0 Setup For Debian Etch (i386)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to install Xen 3.1.0 on a Debian Etch system (i386). Xen lets you create guest operating systems (*nix operating systems like Linux and FreeBSD), so called virtual machines or domUs, under a host operating system (dom0).

Defcon Review

Filed under
Reviews

linuxgames: Computer-room four star generals are probably disappointed with the lack of Real-Time-Strategy games for Linux; the last commercial release worth playing was either Introversion's own Darwinia, Tribal Trouble, or Linux Game Publishing's Majesty. Before that, there was Kohan. In the commercial realm we are missing out on great games like Company of Heroes or Supreme Commander. The most recent indie RTS games of note were Gate 88 and Galcon. Is Defcon worth playing? Let's find out together!

OpenSUSE aims Linux initiative at schools

Filed under
SUSE

desktoplinux: Novell's openSUSE project has launched a new initiative dedicated to advancing the public awareness of the popular Linux distribution in the educational community.

Interview w/ Andy Ritger, Director of Unix Software at NVIDIA

Filed under
Interviews

abclinuxu.cz: Lubos Dolezel has interviewed Nvidia's Director of Unix Software, Andy Ritger. Topics include NVIDIA Linux graphic driver improvement, nvnet driver development, and community relations.

Installing nVidia Graphics card on Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
HowTos

I keep upgrading my Home PC with better peripherals to make it to breathe better for long time. The recent one is a nVidia Graphics card of model 6200A - 256MB - 8X from Zebronics. I have installed Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) for home productive purpose. Here is the steps I did to install this Graphics card in Ubuntu.

A Dell/Ubuntu Laptop - Right out of the box

Filed under
Ubuntu

bryceharrington.org: The day Dell announced I ordered one of their laptops, and today it arrived. I popped open the box to see what's included. The only Ubuntu-specific thing included was the CD. I half-expected to see the 'DELL' logo on the blue-shirted guy. Wink

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Unable To Boot Lenovo Yoga 900 & 900; Is Microsoft At Fault?
    The popular device developer Lenovo has verified the claims that Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s unable to boot Linux OS but only Microsoft Windows 10. The new Lenovo convertible laptop, Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s, would reject and decline any attempt to install Linux operating system, making users turn their heads to Microsoft as the suspect for this issue. [...] This issue about the OS started when an identity of BaronHK posted on Reddit about installing Linux on the latest Lenovo Yoga book in which BaronHK encountered being blocked by a locked solid state drive (SSD) which Linux cannot define itself, and come up to link the issue to Microsoft.
  • How Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2 Performance Compares To Some Other Linux Distros
    The final Ubuntu 16.10 Beta for "Yakkety Yak" was released this week and we found its performance doesn't differ much from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (with the exception of the newer graphics stack) while here are some results comparing it to other modern Linux distributions. Tested for this quick, one-page-article comparison were Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2, Clear Linux 10660, Fedora 24, openSUSE Tumbleweed 20160927, and the Arch-based Antergos 16.9-Rolling release.
  • Qt 3D WIP branches
  • New Qt 3D Functionality Is Being Worked On
    Sean Harmer of KDAB is organizing work around some upcoming "major Qt 3D features" for the open-source toolkit. It's not known if the next round of Qt 3D features will be ready for the Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, but KDAB is looking to have these new branches for feature work with continuous integration coverage.
  • Cross-compiling WebKit2GTK+ for ARM
    Of course, I know for a fact that many people use local recipes to cross-compile WebKit2GTK+ for ARM (or simply build in the target machine, which usually takes a looong time), but those are usually ad-hoc things and hard to reproduce environments locally (or at least hard for me) and, even worse, often bound to downstream projects, so I thought it would be nice to try to have something tested with upstream WebKit2GTK+ and publish it on trac.webkit.org,
  • Should we drop Vala?
    Is it Vala development a waste of time? Is Vala suitable for long term support libraries?
  • SUSECON 2016: Where Technology Reigns Supreme [Ed: “Article Sponsor: SUSE”]
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/39
  • Free software activities in September 2016

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.6 Is Out with MIPS and OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Drivers
    Today, September 30, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the sixth maintenance update to the latest stable Linux 4.7 kernel series. Linux kernel 4.7.6 comes only five days after the release of the previous maintenance version, Linux kernel 4.7.5, and, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the last update, it changes a total of 76 files, with 539 insertions and 455 deletions. In summary, it updates multiple drivers, adds improvements to various filesystems and hardware architectures, and improves the networking stack.
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.23 LTS Has ARM and MIPS Improvements, Updated Filesystems, More
    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly informed the community about the general availability of the Linux 4.4.23 LTS kernel. The Linux 4.4 kernel is a long-term supported branch, the latest and most advanced one, used in many stable and reliable GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Alpine Linux 3.4. Therefore, it is imperative for it to receive regular updates that bring fixes to the most important issues, as well as other general improvements.
  • From NFS to LizardFS
    If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll know that we started our data servers out using NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit some load problems, switched to btrfs, hit load problems again, tried a hacky workaround, ran into problems, dropped DRBD for glusterfs, had a major disaster, switched back to NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit more load problems, and finally dropped DRBD for ZFS.
  • IBM's Ginni Rometty Tells Bankers Not To Rest On Their Digital Laurels
  • BUS1, The Successor To KDBUS, Formally Unveiled -- Aiming For Mainline Linux Kernel
    BUS1 has been in development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism building off the failed KDBUS project. An "RFC" will soon be sent out to Linux kernel developers about BUS1 and the subject will be discussed at next month's Kernel Summit. David Herrmann, one of the BUS1 developers, presented at this week's systemd.conf conference about the new capability-based IPC for Linux. He talked about how BUS1 is superior to KDBUS, how BUS1 is similar to Android's Binder, Chrome's Mojo, Solaris' Doors, and other common IPC implementations.
  • A New Wireless Daemon Is In Development To Potentially Replace wpa_supplicant
    In addition to the BUS1 presentation, also exciting from the systemd.conf 2016 conference is a thorough walkthrough of a new wireless daemon for Linux being developed by Intel's Open-Source Technology Center. Intel has been developing a new wireless daemon for Linux to potentially replace wpa_supplicant. This new daemon isn't yet public but the code repositories for it will be opened up in the next few weeks. This new daemon has improvements around persistency, WiFi management, reduced abstractions for different operating systems and legacy interfaces, and changes to operation. This daemon is designed to be very lightweight and work well for embedded Linux use-cases especially, including IoT applications.