Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Web apps: the next battleground for FOSS?

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Concerned about the increasing popularity of Web applications, Marco Barulli of the Clipperz project has written one of the first detailed suggestions about how free and open source software (FOSS) should respond to the trend. Although neither Barulli nor Clipperz is well-known, his ideas are being listened to by such figures as Richard M. Stallman and Fabrizio Capobianco.

BeOS-like distro focused on content creation

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: A new Ubuntu-based Linux distribution has arrived, aimed at both Linux newbies and content creators. Boasting "out of the box" multimedia codecs, the freely downloadable PC/OS incorporates the lightweight XFCE desktop, and is said to offer a similar layout to the groundbreaking, but ultimately doomed BeOS.

Open source quality checker released

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: An open source software project, originally propped up by European Commission (EC) funds, has released an alpha version of its quality control program, Alitheia Core.

Blender 3D: Interview with Allan Brito

Filed under
Software
Interviews

packtpub.com: Blender is the open source, cross platform suite of tools for 3D creation, capable of modeling, rendering, and animating 3D environments. Packt spokesperson Meeba Abraham approached Allan Brito at the heart of this movement to understand his take on the future of Blender.

Toward an Open Source Society

Filed under
OSS

infoshop.org: One of the oldest arguments against anarchism is that it is impractical, that without central authority to keep the peons in line any large project will dissolve into chaos and disorder. Yet the open source software movement provides modern day proof that anarchism works, even when not conducted by anarchists.

ASUS Eee PC is a good option for a lightweight laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Vincent Danen: The ASUS Eee PC has become a very popular sub-notebook recently and has undergone quite a few revisions since it was first introduced. Initially it had a smaller screen size and a much smaller drive capacity, but the more recent ASUS Eee PC 900 has rectified many of the perceived shortcomings of previous models.

Linux 2.6.26 Opens Up to Debugging

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: No piece of software is immune to defects, which is why it's important to use tools that help find and fix bugs. That's the idea with the new Linux 2.6.26 kernel, which is providing the Linux ecosystem with an integrated kernel debugger to help improve the open source operating system.

Mozilla insists Firefox 3.1 won't be bum note for developers

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla Corporation has claimed that the transition to Firefox 3.1 won’t be “a major pain-in-the-ass” and pledged developers will not be hit by “surprises along the way”, after royally hacking off users with the 3.0 launch.

Also: Corporations can save millions by supporting Firefox on business websites

Thinking about career in Linux? Part 2

Filed under
Linux
Software

brajeshwar.com: In our previous article - Thinking about career in Linux? Part 1, we saw some of the prerequisites which shall help you build a career in Linux, or the Open Source technology. As promised, we move on from where we took a poise, to discuss some more tools/applications which fall under the same category.

openSuSE stumbles, Ubuntu shines

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I tried loading openSuSE 11.0 on my Fujitsu-Siemens Lifebook S2110 over the weekend. It's an AMD Turion 64-based system, and of course it seemed to load just fine. However, for some reason, it stumbled over the Alps touchpad. On the other hand, Ubuntu really shone this afternoon.

Also: Ubuntu Hardy heron on a Sony Vaio VGN-C2S_L

The strength of Linux is in it's flexibility

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: In the material world, it is important for structural components to be strong. They not only have to be strong they also have to be flexible. At the moment I would have to say the strongest operating system is Linux. I say this because out of all the operating systems I know, I believe the most flexible operating system is Linux.

Ubuntu 8.04.1 LTS vs. 8.10 Alpha 2 Performance

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: With Canonical having pulled many new packages into Ubuntu 8.10 from Debian unstable and there being the Linux 2.6.26-rc8 kernel, a near-final version of X.Org 7.4 / Mesa 7.1, and GCC 4.3 among them, we've decided to run a few early benchmarks of Intrepid Ibex.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Understanding Echo, Cat and Add/Append

  • Working with shortcuts in Linux (Ubuntu)
  • Abusing your deb package manager
  • Use Ubuntu Live CD to Backup Files from Your Dead Windows Computer
  • Ten keyboard shortcuts to improve Linux
  • Useful Shortcut Keys In Ubuntu
  • DNS Survivial Guide
  • Atheros AR 5007 EG on openSUSE 11.0
  • Introduction to vi editor in Linux and Unix system

Test drive OpenOffice.org 3.0

Filed under
OOo

tectonic.co.za: OpenOffice.org 3.0, the next major release of the open source office suite, is scheduled to be released in September. Which means that it is pretty much guaranteed to be included in the next release of Ubuntu 8.10, Mandriva 2009 and Fedora 10. Until then it is easy enough to test out the beta. OpenOffice 3.0 has a number of new features.

Finding the Fastest Filesystem

Filed under
Linux

gus3.typepad.com: Part of my "economic stimulus check" went to a 500GB SATA drive. I quickly settled on one goal: find the fastest journaling filesystem (FS) for my SLAMD64 dual-core computer, with 2G of memory. My testing focused on three main areas: filesystem, disk I/O scheduler, and CPU speed.

GNOME 3.0 officially announced... and explained

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: At the recent GNOME User and Developer European Conference (GUADEC), the GNOME release team announced a proposal for developing the next major iteration of the open source desktop environment. The plan offers a long-term strategy for moving GNOME development forward and defining future goals for the desktop.

Desktop Distros

As a long time user of Linux, and reader of Linux Magazines, Websites and Blogs, many see the current Linux situation as being a dawn of a new horizon. Essentially the release of the EEE PC, the timely release of Vista and Ubuntu have all kick started the “Linux Revolution” for the Linux desktop.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 261

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: KDE4: A Fork in the Road, with No Clear Direction?

  • News: Gentoo's False Start, Debian Day 2008, openSUSE Build Service 1.0
  • Released last week: GoblinX 2.7, Absolute Linux 12.1.02
  • Upcoming releases: Granular Linux 1.0, sidux 2008-03
  • Reviewed last week: SliTaz GNU/Linux 1.0, Foresight Linux 2.0.2.1, Puppy Linux 4.00
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Asus blames lack of Linux Eee PCs on Atom hold-ups

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Asus has blamed Intel not Microsoft for the apparent absence of the Atom-based Eee PC 901 from UK suppliers' shelves.

When "Supported" Doesn't Equal "Fully Functional"

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: As your experience in Linux grows, you learn one thing: don’t buy new hardware or peripherals without checking whether it’s supported by your favorite distribution. It saves both money and disappointments. I wanted to buy a decent mediaplayer. One of the players that had both positive reviews and a strong indication of Linux support was the Creative Zen Vision:M.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray

TechNexion has launched a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 capacitive touch panel PC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and offers IP69K protection. TechNexion, which has long been a provider of COMs and SBCs based on Freescale/NXP i.MX SoCs, also sells a line of Linux- and Android-friendly i.MX6, i.MX6UL, and i.MX7 based panel PCs. The latest is a 10.1 inch TWP-1010-IMX6 model that shares many of the same features of its 15.6-inch TWP-1560-IMX6 sibling, including NXP’s i.MX6 SoC, M12 connectors, and a SUS 304 stainless steel case with an IP69K water- and dust-proofing certification. Read more Also: Mongoose OS for IoT prototyping

10 Open Source Skills, Data Analysis Skills and Programming Languages

  • 10 Open Source Skills That Can Lead to Higher Pay
    Last month, The Linux Foundation and the online job board Dice released the results of a survey about open source hiring. It found that 67 percent of managers expected their hiring of open source professionals to increase more than their hiring of other types of IT workers. In addition, 42 percent of managers surveyed said they need to hire more open source talent because they were increasing their use of open source technologies, and 30 said open source was becoming core to their business. A vast majority — 89 percent — of hiring managers said that they were finding it difficult to find the open source talent they need to fill positions.
  • If you want to upgrade your data analysis skills, which programming language should you learn?
    For a growing number of people, data analysis is a central part of their job. Increased data availability, more powerful computing, and an emphasis on analytics-driven decision in business has made it a heyday for data science. According to a report from IBM, in 2015 there were 2.35 million openings for data analytics jobs in the US. It estimates that number will rise to 2.72 million by 2020. A significant share of people who crunch numbers for a living use Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet programs like Google Sheets. Others use proprietary statistical software like SAS, Stata, or SPSS that they often first learned in school.
  • std::bind
    In digging through the ASIO C++ library examples, I came across an actual use of std::bind. Its entry in cppreference seemed like buzzword salad, so I never previously had paid it any attention.

Visual revamp of GNOME To Do

I’m a fan of productivity. It is not a coincidence that I’m the maintainer of Calendar and To Do. And even though I’m not a power user, I’m a heavy user of productivity applications. For some time now, I’m finding the overall experience of GNOME To Do clumsy and far from ideal. Recently, I received a thank you email from a fellow user, and I asked they what they think that could be improved. It was not a surprise when they said To Do’s interface is clumsy too. Read more

Today in Techrights