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About Tux Machines

Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Factory Progress srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 7:12pm
Story Gentoo Screenshot Contest 2011 srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 7:09pm
Story Fuduntu 14.10 Review srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 3:41pm
Story How to create a simple invoice using Libre Office in Ubuntu. tjavailable 01/07/2011 - 1:22pm
Story Reviewed: Mageia 1.0 srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 1:12pm
Story 5 Quick Tips to Improve Ubuntu 11.04 Unity Performance srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 1:11pm
Story Are US open source organisations having their applications for non-profit status blocked? srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 1:08pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 9:23am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 8:21am
Story Firefox 5 A Success For Mozilla srlinuxx 01/07/2011 - 8:07am

Fun with Ubuntu -- Top Ten Next Names, Part 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

Last week I gave you half of my Top Ten Names for Ubuntu releases. As a reminder, they were: 'pissy porcupine', 'bitty bat', 'virtual viper', 'talky tortoise', and (my favorite) 'kinky kangaroo'. Now here are the rest.

Giving Back

Filed under
OSS

In my last article I cited the Vector Linux developers as an excellent example of the way Open Source developers respond to the user community. All of us who benefit from Linux and/or the myriad of Open Source applications out there are part of that community.

Peeking in the Windows of ReactOS 0.3.1

Filed under
OS
Reviews
-s

With the internetnews.com article published today, I found myself a bit curious as to what ReactOS exactly was and what it looked like.

CrossOver Linux 6.01 review

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Though each CrossOver Linux (formerly known as CrossOver Office) release offers substantial improvements, version 6.01 is the most revolutionary release I have seen since I started reviewing this product circa version 3.0.

Matt Asay: Who cares about the Novell/Microsoft patent deal?

Filed under
SUSE

Not their customers, apparently. Matthew Aslett got to talk with a joint Novell/Microsoft guinea pig (I mean, customer Smile, HSBC, and the support for the IP indemnity is underwhelming, at best: "Its a nice to have. I dont think it was a main feature for me, but its nice to have."

GNOME 2.18 (Simply Beautiful)

Filed under
Software

GNOME 2.18 is out, on time as usual. The top-class free desktop for the masses looks and feels better than ever. This is another progressive release in our road to perfection. It integrates another load of improvements done in the visual design, the performance of the desktop components, and the growing collection of integrated applications.

VirtualBox update

Filed under
Software

Innotek released a new version of its virtual machine VirtualBox. The minor update features important bug fixes and useful adjustments which are especially useful on Linux.

When I tested VirtualBox for the first time I was pretty excited. Since then Innotek has released two minor versions featuring several important bugfixes, small features and adjustments.

Use open source Subversion for personal document management

Filed under
HowTos

There is an open source version control system, or revision control system, known as Subversion (svn for short) that has rapidly become a favorite of developers. It enjoys an excellent reputation and a wealth of free, online documentation, as well as a growing body of published texts on the subject of its efficient and practical use.

Bringing Web-based applications offline

Filed under
Software

The Web 2.0 mantra suggests that you forget desktop applications and embrace AJAXified browser-based apps that you can run from any OS, anywhere, as long as you have a speedy connection to the Internet. But what about times when you can't get online? Firefox, Opera, and others are looking to make it possible run applications offline, anytime, anywhere.

A Decade of Linux & Increasingly Stronger

Filed under
Linux

The GNU Manifesto, the internet, and the Open Source movement represent a landmark, joining the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century. Linux, produced by patient hard work, has made remarkable progress during the past decade, and is well positioned for substantial growth.

KDE 4 to be Released in October

Filed under
KDE

Hereby we, the Release Team, present a draft KDE 4.0 Release roadmap which has
been discussed on our mailinglist the past few weeks. It's an optimistic schedule
that aims to release in late October, based on 3 Beta's and 2 release candidates.

KDE 4.0 Roadmap
===============

Milestone: Subsystem Freeze
Date: 1 April 2007

Milestone: Alpha Release + kdelibs soft API Freeze

Ubuntu's Easy Business Server

Filed under
Ubuntu

On top of the migration-assistant and other features being worked on by Ubuntu developers for future releases, one of the items that has been on the table for a while is an Ubuntu Easy Business Server.

ReactOS on The Windows Tail

Filed under
OS

For more than a decade, open source developers have been trying to clone Windows. The latest release of ReactOS 0.3.1 gets them closer than ever before, but don't expect open source Vista just yet. Now, the devs are aiming to be as compatible with Windows 2003 as possible.

The new Debian etch release schedule

Filed under
Linux

After a few months of delay, then, this gives us enough information to
regroup and offer a new projected release timeline. The good news is
that we have not been sitting idle for the past months; many more RC
bugs have been fixed... and found... and fixed since the last release
update, and there have been good upgrade and install reports, which

Why the Office Format Wars are Not Over

Filed under
OSS

Gone are the days when free software could blithely ignore what was happening in the world of proprietary code. The two approaches are now inextricably intertwined as more and more users and companies choose to run both. One paradoxical consequence of this is that as free software becomes more widely deployed, Microsoft's impact on it becomes greater.

It’s five o’clock somewhere… and v.5 is everywhere.

Filed under
Linux

We’ve got our party hats on ’cause it’s time to celebrate. Today, Red Hat announced the general availabilty of the newest member of the family, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. In case you somehow missed the big splash, we’ve got the highlights.

From redhat.com:

  • Read about the newest features, for both server and desktop deployments.

Novell approves 'Windows cheaper than Linux' statement

Filed under
SUSE

Novell has issued a joint press release with Microsoft, in which HSBC, a customer of joint technology from the two companies, claims that Windows has a lower total cost of ownership than Linux.

The press release, issued late on Wednesday, announced that UK-based bank HSBC has agreed to adopt technology from Novell and Microsoft's recently announced partnership.

Why Linux Isn't the Answer to Dell's Problems

Filed under
Linux

Despite years of success, Dell has fallen on hard times. The company that practically reinvented the way people buy computers has been under-performing, and investors are worried. The company has been losing market share and no longer has the edge it once had over competitors like HP and Gateway.

Disappointments with Corporate Desktop 4 BETA

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

If Mandriva Corporate Server 4.0 is a fine product which I warmly recommend to anyone — I actually liked it from the beginning — things are different with Mandriva Corporate Desktop 3.0 BETA (look for download links here).

How To Configure Web Access To Subversion Repositories Using Apache

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

This guide is going to describe the steps to get the mod_dav_svn module to work on an Apache web server. First I will assume that we do not have Apache and Subversion installed on our FreeBSD box, in a second part I will explain how to add the module using our current installation.

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