Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 20 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 20/04/2013 - 8:24am
Story Brutal Legend for Linux appears in Steam srlinuxx 19/04/2013 - 9:45pm
Story Gnome 3.8 Complete Desktop Review srlinuxx 19/04/2013 - 9:41pm
Story 10 Best Ubuntu 13.04 Features srlinuxx 19/04/2013 - 9:38pm
Story Free Software Foundation takes potshot at Windows 8 srlinuxx 1 19/04/2013 - 7:35pm
Story Forming a software foundation? Think again srlinuxx 19/04/2013 - 6:08pm
Story Kernel comment: Bad show, NVIDIA srlinuxx 19/04/2013 - 6:07pm
Poll I'ma Linux srlinuxx 1 19/04/2013 - 7:40am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/04/2013 - 7:13am
Story Fedora Got Leading Edge Game srlinuxx 19/04/2013 - 3:44am

Wikipedia Censors Ubuntu CE!

Filed under
Ubuntu

whatwouldjesusdownload: Unfortunately the Ubuntu CE Wikipedia entry has been removed. The entry is now redirected to a list of Ubuntu based derivatives which, ironically, all still have their own pages on Wikipedia.

Release Day - All Hell Breaks Loose

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: Yesterday we released openSUSE 10.3, and we are pretty impressed what happened. Some rough numbers:

UK culture holding back open source

Filed under
OSS

vnunet.com: Industry experts have identified cultural, as well as technical, factors affecting the take up of open source software in the UK. Many countries in the European Union are showing enthusiastic support for open source, while support in the US is less strong.

Starting from a review of CentOS 5 LiveCD...

Filed under
Linux

beranger: I happened to read Is CentOS 5.0 Worth Every Penny? and this made me even grumpier. How smart have you to be to try a LiveCD under VMWare? Why is it live if not for being able to test it "for real", with direct contact with your real hardware?

Novell Open Audio: openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: As part of a Novell Open Audio series on openSUSE, they will be interviewing various openSUSE developers to find out more about the project, particular involvements and new technologies in the distribution.

Also: OpenSUSE beats Ubuntu to the punch
And: Novell targets Ubuntu, Fedora with OpenSuse 10.3

PC-BSD Day 30: The verdict

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Thirty days with PC-BSD. One month that flew by. In this month I tried to work with PC-BSD every day, sometimes from a more novice viewpoint, sometimes by pushing the limits from the perspective of the more daring user. But, overall, I did what I would normally do on a Linux desktop or at work on a Windows desktop, which -for me- indicates I can make a decent judgment about PC-BSD as a day to day desktop.

Ubuntu - a Speedup guide

Filed under
HowTos

my10sen.com: Ubuntu has been main player in Linux distro for a couple of years, and yet some might found it to be a little bit slow in a few aspects. Here i try to show some of guides that might give a boost to your Ubuntu systems. These tweaks will make your system faster and more responsive.

Is CentOS 5.0 Worth Every Penny?

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot: CentOS is a Linux distribution based on the ever reliable Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). The name stands for Community ENTerprise Operating System and is not related to a coin. The main purpose of CentOS is rebuilding the commercial RHEL and makes it available to those who want the reliability of an enterprise class operating system minus the cost.

Skype 1.4 for Linux out of beta with new features

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: Skype 1.4 for Linux is officially out of Beta, and is available for download. The two big WNITVs (What’s New In This Version) are call forwarding, and a “Birthday Alert” service that notifies you when anyone in your Contact list has a birthday.

Top 40 Linux blogs

Filed under
Linux
Web

linuxworld: Doc Searls makes some good points about blog ranking. It's so bogus, but it's so much fun people can't stop doing it. So here is the Official Linux Blog Top 40 List, divided into A, B, C, and D lists for your status-seeking convenience.

Mozilla Corp, ARM Inc. and Others to Build a New Device

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

softpedia: Mozilla Corp., Arm Ltd, MontaVista Software Inc. and four other companies are trying to extend the market for a new category of devices, a combination between a smartphone and a laptop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Software Freedom Day

  • Kopete for KDE 4.0; Skype 1.4.0 final released
  • Low disk space
  • Linux group calls Microsoft's bluff
  • The Four Freedoms Applied to Software as a Service
  • ODF and OOXML: Something New to Ponder
  • A TortoiseSVN replacement for Ubuntu
  • NFS Client Updates for 2.6.24
  • If I needed one more reason to dismiss Debian...
  • Open Source for Business: Now More Than Ever, Part 1
  • David Pogue on the OLPC
  • NetworkManager 0.7 feature list
  • Will open source desktops succumb to bloat?
  • MyFive: Making Firefox Better
  • Optimized pow() approximation for Java and C / C++

Could PCLinuxOS 2007 Spell Death for Windows on the Desktop?

Filed under
PCLOS

Linux Today: I have been using Linux for about 12 years now and a few weeks ago I discovered PCLinuxOS 2007. Being so impressed with this new, fast, and super easy to use Linux distribution, has made me not only an advocate but an evangelist.

System and enviromental variables

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: System and enviromental variables define parts of the system behavior so it’s worth knowing what they are, what they influence and how to adjust them to your needs. This is the last part of the “console basics” series.

Ubuntu chief bids for prima-donna status

Filed under
Ubuntu

the register (open season): I'd like to live in a tub of cream cheese icing. Sadly, that's not an option for me. It is, however, an option for Canonical/Ubuntu head Mark Shuttleworth. The open source advocate has plenty of cash - enough cash to build a breathing apparatus and waste removal system for a man-sized icing pool.

Your First Computer

more openSUSE and Novell headlines

Filed under
SUSE
  • ReviewLinux.Com: First Look openSUSE 10.3 i386 DVD

  • Novell boosts desktop Linux
  • Novell Gives openSUSE the (Faster) Boot
  • New Feature List for OpenSUSE 10.3
  • Stay Away from OpenSUSE 10.3
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 Launch Party Locations
  • OpenSUSE Linux 10.3 Review
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 opens for business
  • And Novell Fires the First Shot

a few statistics:

Filed under
News
  • Swedish police saves 400 cars by using MySQL

  • Hardware4linux : more than 1500 systems reported and ranked
  • LATU Uruguay Buying 100,000 OLPC XO's Over Classmate PC!!

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • check weather conditions and forecasts on the command line

  • How to automatically sign in to Ubuntu
  • Using a MySQL Performance Tuning Analyzer Script
  • What package is that file in ?
  • Handy script protects Linux against traffic spikes
  • Use ssh on multiple servers at one time
  • Installing Audacity MP3 export support on Linux
  • Adjust the Transparency of Window Decorations with Compiz
  • Digitizing records and tapes with Audacity
  • Compiz-Fusion On Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbin”

Sweet Symphony is out of tune with OOo

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Last month, just one week after IBM announced it would help with OpenOffice.org's development, the company released Lotus Symphony, an office suite based on OpenOffice.org code. I found a lot of slick features in Lotus Symphony, but I worry that Symphony could affect the OpenOffice.org community adversely.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

  • Introducing Docker 1.13
    Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights.
  • Docker 1.13 Officially Released, Docker for AWS and Azure Ready for Production
    Docker announced today the general availability of Docker 1.13, the third major update of the open-source application container engine for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Docker 1.13 has been in development for the past couple of months, during which it received no less than seven RC (Release Candidate) versions that implemented numerous improvements for the new Swarm Mode introduced in Docker 1.12, a few security features, as well as a new Remote API (version 1.25) and Client.
  • Distributed Fabric: A New Architecture for Container-Based Applications
    There’s a palpable sense of excitement in the application development world around container technology. Containers bring a new level of agility and speed to app development, giving developers the ability to break large monolithic apps into small, manageable microservices that can talk to one another, be more easily tested and deployed, and operate more efficiently as a full application. However, containers also demand a new architecture for the application services managing these microservices and apps, particularly in regards to service discovery — locating and consuming the services of those microservices.
  • DevOps trends emerging for 2017 and beyond
    Finally, one of the biggest trends for 2017 will not be just a focus on engaging and implementing some of these DevOps best practices into your enterprise, but a sweeping adoption of the DevOps/agile culture. This is because one of the most important – if not the absolute most key –tenets to a successful DevOps organization is culture. The enterprises that most espouse the shared responsibility, the empowered autonomous teams, the can-do attitudes, and the continuous learning environment in which DevOps thrives will see the biggest benefits.

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Optimizing Linux for Slow Computers
    It’s interesting, to consider what constitutes a power user of an operating system. For most people in the wider world a power user is someone who knows their way around Windows and Microsoft Office a lot, and can help them get their print jobs to come out right. For those of us in our community, and in particular Linux users though it’s a more difficult thing to nail down. If you’re a LibreOffice power user like your Windows counterpart, you’ve only really scratched the surface. Even if you’ve made your Raspberry Pi do all sorts of tricks in Python from the command line, or spent a career shepherding websites onto virtual Linux machines loaded with Apache and MySQL, are you then a power user compared to the person who knows their way around the system at the lower level and has an understanding of the kernel? Probably not. It’s like climbing a mountain with false summits, there are so many layers to power usership. So while some of you readers will be au fait with your OS at its very lowest level, most of us will be somewhere intermediate. We’ll know our way around our OS in terms of the things we do with it, and while those things might be quite advanced we’ll rely on our distribution packager to take care of the vast majority of the hard work.
  • Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years
    In this presentation, kernel hacker Jan Lübbe will explain why apparently reasonable approaches to long-term maintenance fail and how to establish a sustainable workflow instead.
  • Linux 4.9 Is the Next Long-Term Supported Kernel Branch, Says Greg Kroah-Hartman
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman confirmed today, January 19, 2017, in a short message, on his Google+ page, that the Linux 4.9 branch is now marked as "longterm," or as some of you know as LTS (Long-Term Support). The story behind Linux kernel 4.9 becoming the next long-term supported series dates from way before it's launch last month, on December 11, when Linus Torvalds officially announced the new branch. It all started back on August 12, 2016, when Greg Kroah-Hartman dropped a quick Google+ post to say "4.9 == next LTS kernel."
  • Maintainers Don't Scale
    First let’s look at how the kernel community works, and how a change gets merged into Linus Torvalds’ repository. Changes are submitted as patches to mailing list, then get some review and eventually get applied by a maintainer to that maintainer’s git tree. Each maintainer then sends pull request, often directly to Linus. With a few big subsystems (networking, graphics and ARM-SoC are the major ones) there’s a second or third level of sub-maintainers in. 80% of the patches get merged this way, only 20% are committed by a maintainer directly. Most maintainers are just that, a single person, and often responsible for a bunch of different areas in the kernel with corresponding different git branches and repositories. To my knowledge there are only three subsystems that have embraced group maintainership models of different kinds: TIP (x86 and core kernel), ARM-SoC and the graphics subsystem (DRM).

Graphics in Linux

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Has Geometry Shader Support For Testing
    David Airlie has published a set of 31 patches for testing that provide initial support for geometry shaders within the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver. While RadeonSI has long supported geometry shaders, it's been a bigger work item bringing it to this open-source Radeon Vulkan driver within Mesa. The patches are enough for Vulkan geometry shaders to get working on RADV, but Airlie explains that the support isn't gold: "This is a first pass at geometry shader support on radv, all the code should be here in reviewable pieces, it seems to mostly pass CTS tests but triggers some llvm 3.9 bugs around kill, and there might still be a GPU hang in here, but this should still be a good place to start reviewing."
  • libinput 1.6.0
    This release fixes the slow touchpad acceleration on touchpads with less than 1000dpi, a missing call to normalized the deltas was the source of the issue.
  • Libinput 1.6 Released With New Touchpad Acceleration
    Libinput 1.6.0 was announced a short time ago on wayland-devel.
  • Mesa 17 Gets a First Release Candidate, Final Planned for Early February 2017
    Collabora's Emil Velikov announced today, January 19, 2017, the availability of the first of many Release Candidate (RC) development versions of the upcoming and highly anticipated Mesa 17.0.0 3D Graphics Library. Mesa 17 is shaping up to be a huge milestone that should dramatically improve the performance of the bundled open-source graphics drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, Nvidia graphics cards on a Linux-based operating system. Just the other day it enabled OpenGL 4.5 support for Intel Haswell GPUs, which is already a big achievement.

Android Leftovers

  • Donald Trump has surrendered his Android phone
    Donald Trump has given up his beloved Android phone ahead of today’s inauguration, the Associated Press reports, though it is unclear what type of device he will use in the White House. According to The New York Times, Trump is now using a more secure, encrypted handset that was approved by the Secret Service. He also has a different phone number, the Times reports, citing people close to the president-elect. Trump doesn’t use email, but he does use his Android phone to tweet. He’s also been very accessible throughout the presidential campaign and transition, taking calls from reporters, politicians, and world leaders. Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister of Australia, called Trump to congratulate him on his electoral victory after getting his cellphone number from professional golfer Greg Norman.
  • Best affordable Android smartphones you can buy [January 2017]
    There are new smartphones hitting the market constantly, but which is the best to pick up when you’re trying to save a buck or two? We’ve seen some great launches this summer and we’re only expecting more over the coming months, but for now, let’s go over the best affordable Android smartphones you can go pick up today…
  • A list of every Samsung phone getting Android 7.0 Nougat this year
  • WatchMaker to support Gear S2 & Gear S3, 1000s of watchfaces incoming
    WatchMaker, a popular Android and Android Wear watchface platform, has some good news for our readers. They are currently in the process of expanding their supported platforms and will be targeting Tizen and its latest wearable smartwatches, the Samsung Gear S2 and Gear S3.