Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Diversity in FOSS - help or hinderance?

Filed under
OSS

FOSSwire: One feature of the free software/open source development model that is largely unique and differs from the proprietary model is sheer diversity.

Ubuntu vs. Debian, graphically explained

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger: col·lab·o·rate
1 : to work jointly with others or together especially in an intellectual endeavor
Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary, 11th

par·a·site
synonyms: PARASITE, SYCOPHANT, TOADY, LEECH, SPONGE

Brainstorming ideas for the GIMP's next interface

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The GIMP image editor is preparing for the start of a new development cycle, and you can have your say in the way the next version looks by submitting a mock-up to the GIMP UI Brainstorm blog. User interface designer Peter Sikking spoke with us about the project and how it fits into the larger work of creating the GIMP's UI.

Get down and dirty with Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcadvisor: Let me start with a controversial statement: installing new software is almost always easier on Linux than on Windows. On most Linux systems, a package manager takes care of both the installation and removal of software.

The SUSE impression fades a little

Filed under
SUSE

abhay-techzone.blogspot: I was in total awe of SUSE 10.2. I liked its stability, performance, improvements to OpenOffice, YAST2, security, default fonts and above all the default theme and artwork. I was all praises for SUSE in my comparison of SUSE with Ubuntu. A lot has changed since then.

One day without graphics but with Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxscrews: The idea to work one day without graphical applications and use only text utilities like wget isn't new but… Here is the list of essential tools that are invaluable to make "text mode day" real.

Linux 2.6.23 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

Phoronix: The Linux 2.6.23 kernel has been released today and we have some preliminary benchmarks of the 2.6.23 kernel as we compare it to the past Linux 2.6.22 kernel.

Fedora Developer Interview: Máirín Duffy

Filed under
Interviews

Fedoraproject: Over the past few releases, Fedora has gained a reputation amongst the various distributions for having some of the best artwork out there. This time around, responsibility has been handed over entirely to the community Art Team, and they've done themselves proud. Mairin Duffy, Fedora Art team lead, previews of some of the key elements belonging to the infinity theme.

Luke Schierer discusses Pidgin, Open source and life

Filed under
Interviews

computerworld: With over 3 million estimated users, Pidgin is an open source instant messaging program for Windows, Linux, BSD, and other Unix platforms. It works with AIM, ICQ, Jabber/XMPP, MSN Messenger, Yahoo, Bonjour, Gadu-Gadu, IRC, Novell GroupWise Messenger, QQ, Lotus Sametime, SILC, SIMPLE, MySpaceIM, and Zephyr.

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.23 Released

Filed under
Linux

pcburn: Linus has tagged the final release of kernel 2.6.23. Grab a copy from kernel.org and give it a run through if you've been waiting on features.

Show us your pumpkins!

Filed under
OSS

red hat mag: We’re giving away $50 for the best pumpkin related to open source, Linux, Red Hat, Creative Commons, or any of the other things we post about here. Carve it, paint it, however you want to decorate it, as long as it’s creative.

XSensors 0.60: New Chips

Filed under
Hardware
Software

linuxhardware.org: This is another release of xsensors, a program designed to display all the related information from your motherboard sensors. This information is gathered via lm_sensors, the software drivers that actually gathers the sensor information.

opensuse-xgl-settings

Filed under
Software
SUSE

CyberOrg: cb400f has released his popular opensuse-xgl-settings for openSUSE 10.3, it is a GUI tool for KDE that makes installing and configuring Compiz Fusion painless.

Xubuntu in *urgent* need of testers

Filed under
Ubuntu

xubuntu.wordpress: In order to prevent a sudden surge of bug reports after Xubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) has been released, everybody is encouraged to test the new daily images of Xubuntu now.

Which Mandriva Linux Edition That's Right For You

Filed under
MDV

linuxmini: The One edition of Mandriva Linux is a Live CD. A Live CD is an operating system which boots and runs directly from CD, with no installation required. The Free edition of Mandriva Linux is so named because it is 'free' in both senses: it costs nothing and it contains only free and open source software.

Customize Compiz in Ubuntu Gutsy

Filed under
Ubuntu

maximum pc: With nine days remaining before the release of Ubuntu's latest version, Gutsy Gibbon 7.10, everyone's asking how the integrated Desktop Effects will work. So here's the deal.

Is Linux server more secure than Windows server?

Filed under
OS

nixcraft: Many new Linux user / admin asks: Is Linux more secure than Windows? That depends. Wink Let me explain:

Control multimedia applications with ReMoot

Filed under
Software

linux.com: You can manage most of today's multimedia applications easily with ReMoot, a universal remote control program. ReMoot even provides an esoteric way of controlling your PC remotely from your cell phone or PDA, earning it top geek points.

Master your domain with Linux

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Every web site needs a domain name. Every domain name needs DNS. Yet, it’s often overlooked and misunderstood. If you own a domain you need to understand DNS. And here’s the low-down as well as some helpful Linux tools.

Gigabyte GA-X38-DQ6

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: While the P35 works wonders on Linux, how does Intel's soon-to-be-shipped X38 work with Linux? Well, in this article we will tell you how this new Intel Chipset, which supports two PCI Express 2.0 slots and other improvements, is able to function on a Linux desktop and Solaris. At hand we have the Gigabyte X38-DQ6 motherboard as we explore its alternative OS compatibility and performance.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.

Arch Linux News

  • Linux Top 3: Arch Anywhere, Bitkey and Vinux
    Arch Linux is a powerful rolling Linux distribution, that hasn't always been particularly easy for new users to install and deploy. The goal of the Arch Anywhere system is to provide new and old users with the ability to install a fully custom Arch Linux system in minutes.
  • Arch Linux Preparing To Deprecate i686 Support
    Arch Linux is moving ahead with preparing to deprecate i686 (x86 32-bit) support in their distribution. Due to declining usage of Arch Linux i686, they will be phasing out official support for the architecture. Next month's ISO spin will be the last for offering a 32-bit Arch Linux install. Following that will be a nine month deprecation period where i686 packages will still see updates.
  • News draft for i686 deprecation
    Finally found some time to write a draft for news post on i686. Here it is: Title: i686 is dead, long live i686 Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that February ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Arch Linux. The next 9 months are deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging and repository tools will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported. However, as there is still some interest in keeping i686 alive, we would like to encourage the community to make it happen with our guidance. Depending on the demand, an official channel and mailing list will be created for second tier architectures.

LinuxCon Europe on 100G Networking

  • The World of 100G Networking
    Capacity and speed requirements keep increasing for networking, but going from where are now to 100G networking isn’t a trivial matter, as Christopher Lameter and Fernando Garcia discussed recently in their LinuxCon Europe talk about the world of 100G networking. It may not be easy, but with recently developed machine learning algorithms combined with new, more powerful servers, the idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective.
  • The World of 100G Networking by Christoph Lameter
    The idea of 100G networking is becoming feasible and cost effective. This talk gives an overview about the competing technologies in terms of technological differences and capabilities and then discusses the challenges of using various kernel interfaces to communicate at these high speeds.

Development News

  • Oh, the things Vim could teach Silicon Valley's code slingers
    Vim text editor turned 25 late last year – the first public iteration was launched on November 2, 1991, a couple of weeks after Linus Torvalds announced Linux. To celebrate Vim's anniversary, creator Bram Moolenaar recently dropped version 8.0. Ordinarily the update of a text editor wouldn't be worth mentioning, but this is the first major Vim release in ten years. In today's world, where web browsers drop major point updates (what they consider major, anyway) several times a year, Vim's lack of major updates is not just refreshing, but speaks of an entirely different approach to developing software. Even leaving aside the absurd version system of today's web browsers, eight releases in 25 years would be considered slow by today's software development standards. Interestingly, though, Vim's biggest rival, GNU Emacs, has a roughly similar development pace. GNU Emacs began life in the 1970s and is currently at version 25, which means it averages two releases to Vim's one, but still definitely on the slow side.
  • Learn to code site Code.org loses student work due to index bug
    Learn-to-code site Code.org is apologising to its students after being caught by a database table maxing out, and dropping progress for an unknown number of participants. In its mea-culpa blog post, the group says it was burned by a database table with a 32-bit index.
  • GCC 7.0 Lands The BRIG Frontend For AMD's HSA
    GCC 7 moved on to only bug/documentation fixes but an exception was granted to allow the BRIG front-end to land for AMD's HSA support in this year's GNU Compiler Collection update. As of this morning, the BRIG front-end has merged. BRIG is the binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). This BRING front-end also brings the libhsail-rt run-time into GCC. So far BRIG in GCC has just been tested on Linux x86_64.