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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open source - it's all about choice

Filed under
OSS

stuff.co.nz: There have always been people in society who help others just because they can - the cub scout leader, the charity volunteer, the community clean up group, they all contribute to making the world a better place.

Using Gmusicbrowser takes a lot of getting used to

Filed under
Software

newlinuxuser.com: Rhythmbox is the default on Ubuntu and these days I find VLC’s user interface too limited when it comes to playing music files. I’d rather stick with Rhythmbox.

9 tips for Ubuntu notebook users

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntukungfu.org/blog: Here are some tips for Ubuntu users who use notebook computers, including how to sync files effortlessly between a laptop and desktop, how to switch CPU speeds on the fly from the desktop, how to power-save your hard disk, and more.

STUX 2.0 exhibits major improvements

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: STUX 2.0, released last month, is a remarkable improvement from the 0.9.2 release I reviewed a couple years ago. While the look and feel of the Slackware-based distribution have stayed pretty much the same, STUX lacks the glaring technical problems that made it unusable on the previous occasion.

Linux Creator Linus Torvalds, Others Honored In Silicon Valley

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: The Computer History Museum Tuesday night honored three legends in the industry, including Linux-creator Linus Torvalds whose operating system became the catalyst for the open-source software movement that challenged traditional concepts of intellectual property.

Debian Lenny Slogan Contest

Filed under
Linux

ducea.com: The Debian Art team is seeking a slogan for the next stable release, Debian GNU/Linux 5.0 “Lenny”.

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3 Now Available

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE Project is proud to announce the availability of beta 3 of the 11.1 release. It’s a few days late, but much better for the delay. Beta 3 is now available for immediate download and testing.

When installing, do you...

Annual Kaspersky Labs Fearmongering (2008 Edition)!

Its that time of year again! Merry Fearmongering everybody!

few odds & ends

Filed under
Linux
  • Ubuntu is... umm.. kinda f-ed

  • How to Break Up With the Linux Community
  • 7 Reasons to Pick Ubuntu and When Not to Choose It
  • Ten Commandments for New Linux Users

Introducing Open Source to the World - Part 3

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: Switching users who are uncommitted, or can't switch cold turkey, are some of the hardest. One of the easiest ways I've found to help them make the switch is to do a multistep plan with them, similar to how smokers or others do in order to quit.

Review: Slax 6.0.7

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: For some reason, I didn’t get Linux Format Magazine issue #110 when I was supposed to. I ordered another copy and it arrived recently, so it’s time for another slate of Linux reviews.

Why Microsoft Wants Us to Get All Mixed Up

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: “What's in a name?” some bloke in the sixteenth century once asked. As Microsoft knows, quite a lot. What you call something can have a major influence on how you think about it. So how Microsoft talks about free software is important – not least for the clues that it gives about its latest tactical move to defang the open source threat.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.28 - Part 3: Dodgy drivers

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: At the Kernel Summit a few weeks ago, kernel hackers accepted the "linux-staging" development tree into the main development tree (1, 2) (Kernel-Summit). Greg Kroah-Hartman started linux-staging a few months ago as a place to bring together open source drivers that are maintained independently of the official Linux kernel but do not satisfy the kernel developers' quality requirements.

Linux Foundation Publishes Study Estimating the Value of Linux

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation today announced it is publishing a new report on the value of Linux development. The paper finds that it would take approximately $10.8 billion to build the Linux community distribution Fedora 9 in today’s dollars with today’s software development costs. It would take $1.4 billion to develop the Linux kernel alone.

Why do we Release openSUSE on Thursdays - or why do we Slip?

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger: openSUSE 11.1 Beta3 is a bit later than expected (it should go out later today). Of course, this raised couple of questions why. So let me explain how a build of a Beta release works in general from release manager perspective and what are the reasons for the slip.

Hey, Dad…Can I have Linux back?

Filed under
Linux

education.zdnet: My oldest son, creator of flame wars, finally discovered that you can only surf to the nether regions of the Internet so many times before even Vista business succumbs to malware. His computer an unusable mass of pop-ups, spewing traffic over our network actually asked me tonight to reinstall Linux for him.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS Magazine October 2008 Released

  • Mac OS is better than Ubuntu Linux: A myth
  • Tracking down license infringements with the GPL Compliance Engineering Guide
  • Let's Dance: Learning The Samba
  • Fooling windows by dancing the samba with Linux
  • ScreenCast: Fedora Talk with Twinkle
  • Foresight 2.0.5 review - First Impressions
  • A Week Of Open Source Riches
  • Novell Open Enterprise beta targets Netware users
  • Mozilla Developer News 10/21
  • Symbian seeks to attract developers with open-source code
  • Android is now Open Source
  • Encrypt CD/DVDs
  • Apricot netbook ditches Linux
  • Gentoo-Wiki, Gentoo-portage Down
  • Linux Carried Along on Netbooks Wave
  • Is commercial open source possible?
  • Improve MySQL performance with MySQLTuner
  • Sending Email From Your System with sSMTP
  • BBC Weather
  • Indamixx sound box plays on Linux base
  • Red Hat promises open-source virtualization technology
  • Change (gk)sudo timeout
  • Examining the compilation process. part 2.
  • Interview With David Ascher And Dan Mosedale - Thunderbird - Mozilla Messaging

Plat'Home Unveils Final Results of "Will Linux Work?"

Filed under
Linux

PR: Plat'Home today announced the results of the "Will Linux Work?" contest. For the past month, Plat'Home's OpenMicroServer (OMS) has been in the hands of the four contest winners who have put Linux to the test.

Release your creative side with Ubuntu Studio

Filed under
Ubuntu

greenhughes.com: Often when we talk about Linux it is often in the context of a computer enthusiast, a person who enjoys finding out what open source technology can do for them. A group that sometimes we don't think about is our creative friends, artists, musicians, animators, audio engineers, video editors and suchlike.

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More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

GNU/Linux Desktop

  • Austrian Schools
    Here it is 2017 and Austrian schools are using GNU/Linux and folks are still having problems with That Other OS in schools. I was in a similar situation back in 2000 when I first installed GNU/Linux in my classroom. TOOS didn’t work for me then and it still doesn’t work for schools today. Any time you have a monopolist telling you what you can and can’t do in your classroom, you’re going to have problems, especially if that monopolist isn’t particularly supportive of your objectives. In my case, M$ was celebrating its monopoly and didn’t even care if the software crashed hourly. I later discovered there were all kinds of evil consequences of the EULA from Hell, like limiting the size of networks without a server running their software and fat licensing fees.
  • How to build the fastest Linux PC possible on a budget
    There’s nothing more satisfying than watching a system boot up almost instantaneously when the power switch is hit. Long gone are the days of going to make yourself a brew while those spinning platters buzz and the display kicks into life, lazily dragging you into the GUI you call home. But surely that luxury of speed is reserved for those who are willing to drop £1,000+ on a new system? Fortunately, this is not the case anymore. With advancements in technology over the last six years, and Intel’s aggressive push to keep reinvigorating its chipsets each and every generation, we’re starting to see more and more affordable budget, speed-oriented components finally making it to market. The SSD has succeeded the hard drive with sub 10-second boot times and lightning quick file transfers. However, three years on and we’ve seen both the rise and fall of the SATA III bus. This was a standard that was supposed to last us until 2020, but now lies completely saturated, with only the ever enduring HDD still making good use of the connectivity.
  • How to communicate from a Linux shell: Email, instant messaging
    I get a lot of questions on how to perform various tasks from a Linux shell/terminal. In the interest of making a simple cheat sheet—something I can point people to that will help them get rolling with terminal powers—what follows are my recommendations for how to perform various types of communication from your shell. I’m talking about the normal sort of communication most people perform via a web browser (or a handful of graphical applications) nowadays: Email, instant messaging, that sort of thing. Except, you know, running them entirely in a terminal—which you can run just about anywhere: in an SSH session on a remote server, on a handheld device, or even on your Android phone/tablet.
  • 5 signs that you are a Linux geek
    Linux users are a passionate bunch, and some are downright proud of their of their geekiness. But if you’re not sure about your status, a writer at MakeUseOf has a list of 5 signs that show you are a Linux geek.

Security News

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Kaspersky: No whiff of Linux in our OS because we need new start to secure IoT [Ed: Kaspersky repeats the same anti-Linux rhetoric he used years ago to market itself, anti-Linux Liam Tung recycles]
    Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of Kaspersky Lab, says its new KasperskyOS for securing industrial IoT devices does not contain "even the slightest smell of Linux", differentiating it from many other IoT products that have the open-source OS at the core.
  • Reproducible Builds: week 95 in Stretch cycle
  • EU privacy watchdogs say Windows 10 settings still raise concerns
    European Union data protection watchdogs said on Monday they were still concerned about the privacy settings of Microsoft's Windows 10 operating system despite the U.S. company announcing changes to the installation process. The watchdogs, a group made up of the EU's 28 authorities responsible for enforcing data protection law, wrote to Microsoft last year expressing concerns about the default installation settings of Windows 10 and users' apparent lack of control over the company's processing of their data. The group - referred to as the Article 29 Working Party -asked for more explanation of Microsoft's processing of personal data for various purposes, including advertising.

Android Leftovers