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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 04 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Forum topic System monitoring with Pandora FMS 4.0 geniususer 20/10/2011 - 3:14pm
Story Mandriva 2011.0 - Supreme start, unhappy ending srlinuxx 1 20/10/2011 - 3:09pm
Story Why I Switched to Linux srlinuxx 20/10/2011 - 3:24am
Story The Little Desktop That Could srlinuxx 20/10/2011 - 3:22am
Story Blender 2.60 Released srlinuxx 20/10/2011 - 3:20am
Blog entry Sabayon 7 GNOME 3 review finid 20/10/2011 - 2:33am
Story Giving up Windows 7 for Ubuntu 11.10 srlinuxx 20/10/2011 - 12:25am
Story 5 Open Source Games Come Together to Form 'Free Game Alliance' srlinuxx 19/10/2011 - 11:19pm
Story ICANN takes control of Internet Time Keeping srlinuxx 19/10/2011 - 10:50pm
Story Take your Linux PC back to the future! srlinuxx 19/10/2011 - 10:45pm

Today's Leftovers

Filed under
News
  • GoboLinux: An Interview with Lucas Villa

  • Gutsy Automatic Codec detection!
  • Five Amarok Tips and Tricks
  • Mandrivan's Distro Review Progress
  • Filter your Home Internet Traffic via Squid - Proxy Server
  • Mozilla and Mobile
  • 3 types of C++ programmers
  • OpenSuse 10.3 Review
  • Nautilus vs. Dolphin vs. Konqueror
  • Connect to VMware Server Console Over SSH
  • bc: an arbitrary precision numeric processing language
  • An Absolute Review
  • Does Linux kernel 2.6.23 break VMware Server?
  • Xubuntu vs Puppy
  • Whats New and Changed in NVIDIA Linux Display Driver 100.14.19

Measuring Process Scheduler Performance

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "As far as my testsystem goes, v2.6.23 beats v2.6.22.9 in sysbench," explained Ingo Molnar in response to a posting showing the opposite results. As you can see it in the graph, v2.6.23 schedules much more consistently too."

Linux Not Ready for the Desktop? Really?

Filed under
Linux

pcworld blogs: I was somewhat amused to read Michael Gartenberg's comments that Linux is still not ready for the desktop. Please don't tell that to any of the people who last year logged in 40,000 times to the 28 Linux computers at our small town library and community center in Takoma Park, Maryland.

Will Ubuntu Servers from Major Vendors Get Us Closer to a Linux Law Office?

Filed under
Ubuntu

lawtech.wordpress: As I mentioned in a previous post, I do not believe Linux is ready yet for the desktop in the solo or small firm, no matter how much I may want to see that happen. The one exception I made was with servers.

Comments on 'Security without firewalls'

Filed under
Security

Geek Pit: Debian Administration has an article up about the usefulness of firewalls. Are they really necessary? If you consider a firewall as just a non-stateful, layer-3 packet filter, then I would agree they are not very useful. However,

Desktop dreaming

Filed under
Software

TuxDeluxe: Since increasing numbers of Windows users have deserted their roots and infiltrated the citadel, Linux users have changed their expectations. We need an intuitive interface and a multitude of choices - Gnome or KDE, which do you prefer?

Why Ubuntu Linux Tops Debian

Filed under
Ubuntu

matt hartley: For those of you who have used it, you'll know that Debian is a solid distribution of Linux. Like Fedora or OpenSuSe, it was developed with all users in mind. Unfortunately, what many of the geekier users to this day fail to wrap their minds around is that this "Windows thinking" they complain about is more or less about ease of use, versus "choice." And I believe that this is why Ubuntu is, more than other Debian distributions, out-performing Debian proper.

Also: Ubuntu: We Are Not Corporate
And: Run Photoshop with Ubuntu (or any other Linux)

WordPress makes a stand for open source morality

Filed under
OSS

guardian.co.uk: Matt Mullenweg, the 23-year-old who is the founding developer of the open source blogging software WordPress, woke up in March to find that disaster had struck.

Also: Legal firms wake up to open source
And: Hackers eye open source coding tools

Ubuntu's "Gutsy Gibbon 7.10" release Oct 18 with a full 3D GUI

Filed under
Ubuntu

tgdaily: Ubuntu is quickly becoming one of the most popular Linux distributions. Its current release is version 7.04, entitled Feisty Fawn. The next version will be 7.10, dubbed Gutsy Gibbon.

The step-by-step guide to installing ATI/NVIDIA, Xgl/AIGLX, and Compiz Fusion

Filed under
HowTos

fsm: Compiz Fusion has little or no documentation. The little that exists is meant for hardcore geeks who are expected to know what obscure and unintuitive commands like “git” are. Therefore, this guide was created as a sort of all-in-one guide for all users of the major Ubuntu distributions and the major video cards.

Shuttleworth on Ballmer

Filed under
OSS

linux-watch: Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has once more claimed that Linux and open source violates Microsoft's intellectual property and patents. Canonical's CEO Mark Shuttleworth thinks Ballmer has it all wrong.

OS Horse Race: Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

itmanagement.earthweb: The competition for market share between the leading desktop OSes, Windows, Mac and Linux, has seen no major revolution this year. But based on data from Net Applications, there have been subtle changes that suggest major shifts in the years ahead.

Public Service Announcement: NOKEY errors with 2008

Filed under
MDV

adamw: This is for anyone getting NOKEY errors trying to install packages from the online repositories for Mandriva Linux 2008.

Linux kernel 2.6.23 released with a wee bit of controversy

Filed under
Linux

zdnet blogs: Another update of the Linux kernel slipped out this week with a new process scheduler, virtualization options and a wee bit of controversy to boot. Linux 2.6.23, which was released October 9, incorporates a new process scheduler called the Completely Fair Scheduler.

Mandriva 2008

Filed under
MDV

Tom Albers's blog: Last week I installed Mandriva Spring edition. This week version 2008 was officially released. Yesterday I updated my system to 2008, but that left my computer in a bad shape. The new kernel paniced while trying to unpack the initrd. Very strange things. In the end I decided to simply download the One cd and see if that one would run.

Linspire promises friendly Linux for new users

Filed under
Linux

PCPro: Linspire is seeking to overturn the image of Linux being a difficult proposition for new users by bundling its latest operating system with a whole range of proprietary drivers, codecs and software.

Ubuntu 7.10 Supports Install-Time Encryption

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: If you have wanted to encrypt your Ubuntu installation on your hard drive quickly and easily, with Ubuntu 7.10 "Gutsy Gibbon" it's become even easier now that the alternate installer supports encrypting partitions. However, the Ubuntu 7.10 "Gutsy Gibbon" Ubiquity installer currently lacks LVM and dm-crypt support.

Linux Mint 3.0 - KDE Community Edition

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: Linux Mint is a distribution that rests in a rather interesting position within the Linux community. While it's a unique and separate distribution in and of itself, it's so much like Ubuntu that it's almost like a clone.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing Cinelerra on Ubuntu Studio

  • Converting text files into ODF with odtwriter
  • Howto Forward root’s mail to your inbox
  • Mandriva tutorials for system administrators
  • How To: Stream Music From The iPhone In Ubuntu
  • fstab with uuid

Red Hat: Customers can Deploy Linux With Confidence

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: Red Hat is assuring its customers that they can continue to deploy its Linux operating system with confidence and without fear of legal retribution from Microsoft, despite the increasingly vocal threats emanating from Redmond.

Also: Ballmer comments reflect deeper problems

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