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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 3.19-rc4 Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 11:41pm
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of Peppermint Linux 5 Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 11:27pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Xfce released Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 9:35pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:40pm
Story SlimPort Nano-Console Brings Android to Big Screens Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:33pm
Story VW shows Android Auto in car system at CES 2015 Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:28pm
Story CES 2015: LG announces G Flex 2 with improved specs and user experience Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:26pm
Story Do You Work in the Data Center? Here Are Three Open Source Projects You Need to Know About Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 5:54pm
Story LibreCalc, The 3D Printed Linux Calculator Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 5:52pm
Story FreeBSD Finishes Switching Over To GNOME 3.x Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 12:25pm

Arch Linux 2009.02

Filed under
Linux

blog.jjtcomputing.co.uk: Arch Linux is a distro developed without assitance from any of the major distributions, and is targeted at experienced users of Linux.

Has Linux lost its root vision?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: When I first started using Linux it was fast. Even the most bloated of desktop environments, gnome and kde, were blindingly fast when compared to other operating systems on the same hardware. This was because the unsung volunteer hero's of the open source world took pride in producing the best code they possibly could.

Open source adoption 'anomaly' in Philippines

Filed under
OSS

zdnetasia.com: Like several economies in the region, open source adoption in the Philippines is gradually expanding as organizations to seek alternatives to expensive proprietary software. But, unlike some markets, early adopters in the country come from the private sector.

The not-so-intuitive Intuition of Intuit

Filed under
OSS

robertogaloppini.net: The lines between open source and proprietary vendors’ software strategies continue to blur. Intuit announced the launch of a community site for developers interested in creating connected on line applications for small businesses, providing them with a number of open source tools.

Will I Go Back?

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

I'm using the Linux distribution Ubuntu for over a year now – I hopped on the train with version 8.04 LTS. Although I still 'need' Windows for a number of things, I am more than pleased with this operating system. It runs perfectly – almost.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Vim Gives to Charity and Gives Back to Donors

  • Ubuntu Hard Lock – Not What I Thought
  • BIND name server vulnerable to DoS attacks
  • Boot-Up Manager: a graphical runlevel editor
  • Success with FOSS
  • Alan Cox Quits As Linux TTY Maintainer
  • Compiz Fusion boost my 3D performance
  • On The FAA's Slow And Steady SWIM To Open Source
  • An Updated ATI Kernel Mode-Setting Driver
  • Mozilla starts preparing developers for Firefox 3.6
  • Enterprise IT Hits Bottom - Open Source Holds an Intervention
  • Internet Systems Consortium using Drupal
  • Wallpaper a Day - Day 0
  • Create your own system branding
  • Free Books For Approved LoCo Teams
  • Median filter in GIMP is called despeckle filter
  • Post-OSCON roundup
  • Easy Netbook Linux
  • OpenGL Programming Guide
  • Dell: New Ubuntu Desktop PC Within Days
  • Ubuntu Experiment – Part 1

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Changing visudo to use nano

  • Linux, what nice… passwords you have… and your prompts are incredible…
  • How to install VLC 1 (Goldeneye) in Ubuntu
  • change compression algorithm of KDE4 ark dolphin context menu
  • pkill things when killall isn't enough
  • BIND 9 Dynamic Update
  • Using Oxygen Icons Without KDE
  • TIP: Resolving udev startup error messages on Debian
  • How to Encrypt Your File System
  • No page number on first page in OOo
  • Create your own distro with Product Creator

Run your Linux LiveCD in Windows with one click

Filed under
Linux

Like any new Linux user I had problems burning/installing Linux from Windows. I had to learn how to fix problems the hard way but that didn't stop me from trying again. Here I'd like to share a tool I use to run any Linux liveCD (ISO) inside Windows without any experience at all!

The Gap moves from Windows to Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: Red Hat recently posted an interesting case study on how retail giant The Gap moved from a Unix and Windows based e-commerce infrastructure to one based on Red Hat Linux.

Debian is NOT switching to time-based releases

Filed under
Linux

mdzlog.alcor.net: At DebConf 9 this week, the Debian release team proposed a new approach to Debian’s release cycle, which was then announced on the Debian web site. Both the Debconf presentation and the announcement were quite clear, but a number of news articles and blog posts on the subject seem to have misinterpreted them.

Fit-PC2 review: The world’s smallest desktop PC

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

roytanck.com: The Fit-PC2 is the world’s smallest fully functional desktop PC. It’s about 1/4 the volume of a Mac Mini, and it still has all the necessary connections and features to be used as a home or office computer.

Are Proprietary Tools the Key to Linux Desktop Success?

daniweb.com/blogs: I'm having a rather traumatic experience with certain Microsoft products lately. The problem is, that to manage a true Hyper-V system remotely, you must have a Windows Vista or Windows 7 system. Where's the freedom in that?

10 IT flame wars that will never go away

blogs.techrepublic.com: If you’ve been involved in IT over the past few decades, you know that the flame of war has always burned strong. It’s like the best rivalries in sports, with camps residing on opposite sides of the field. Chances are, you’ve been in at least one of these flame wars over the years.

antiX-M8.2

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Up this time is antiX, a light-weight version of Linux based on SimplyMEPIS. antiX is geared toward older systems but it’s also quite usable on more modern hardware.

Make the most of large drives with GPT and Linux

Filed under
Linux

Preparing for future Linux disk storage with the GUID Partition Table

Will Smartbooks Replace Netbooks?

Filed under
Hardware

guardian.co.uk: Could netbooks be replaced by smartbooks? Yes. But will they? Maybe. The general idea is to run smartphone software such as Google's Linux-based Android and Microsoft's Windows CE (AKA Windows Mobile) on portable computers with 7in-10in screens.

MicroHoo: Good or Bad for Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com/blogs: News that Microsoft and Yahoo have finally agreed a formula for their collaboration comes almost as a relief after what seems like years of tiresome on-off negotiations. I think it's necessary to distinguish between short-term and long-term effects.

Beyond the hype: Where open source actually saves you money

Filed under
OSS

cnet.com: Talk to any open-source vendor (myself included), and we'll tell you that there's a lot of money to be saved by dropping your proprietary software in favor of open-source alternatives. But is that always the case? And, if so, what are the necessary preconditions for saving money?

Aisleriot - Solitaire on Steroids

Filed under
Gaming

raiden.net: Despite all the people who claim to be productive at work, or those who claim to be more than a casual gamer, there is a lot, and I do mean a lot, of people out there who are either casual gamers, or they love to play various solitaire card games on the computer.

Microsoft Releases GPL'd Software (Again): Does This Change Anything?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

softwarefreedom.org/blog: Microsoft has received much undeserved press about their recent release of Linux drivers for their virtualization technology under GPLv2. I say “undeserved” because I don't particularly see why Microsoft should be lauded merely for doing something that is in their own interest that they've done before.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.