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Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Linux server with ARM processor rolled out by Boston Limited Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2013 - 3:04am
Story In support of open source launchers sb56637 19/11/2013 - 11:53pm
Blog entry Windows 8.1 "The Worst Ever" gfranken 19/11/2013 - 10:58pm
Story New Linux Hypervisor Announced: Jailhouse Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 10:21pm
Story AMD Radeon R9 290 On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 10:11pm
Story Samsung defies critics, ships 800,000 Galaxy Gear smartwatches in two months Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 10:11pm
Story Viber updates desktop app, brings support for stickers; launches Linux client Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 7:46pm
Story Looking For A Linux Laptop? Here's Help Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 7:40pm
Story Tiny open source board runs Linux on i.MX6 Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 7:23pm
Story Top 20 open source gifts for the holidays Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 7:19pm

Yes, I'm Free, Said The Open Source Software Idea

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OSS In the beginning was... hacker culture and free Internet software. They existed as outsiders. They were really known by few. But some knew of them and an idea started to grow... it was first only in one person's mind, then two, then it spread to the hacker culture and further into the business world.

Mandriva 2008 Spring vs. Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ... and how neither one wins

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cool-stuff-or-not.blogspot: Mandriva launched the new 2008 Spring version (or 2008.1) around April 9th 2008 and just 2 weeks later around April 24th Ubuntu 8.04 LTS was out clogging the internet pipes in a download frenzy Smile Needless to say - I have tested both final versions on a number of computers.

What can KDE 4.1 do for you ?

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KDE We, the KDE team, have done a huge effort of making KDE 4.1 series a really usable desktop, and I really think we are going in a good path. KDE is stabilizing in general terms, and kdelibs goodies are starting to be used widely by almost all applications.

Firefox 3: A Safari User’s Review

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Moz/FF Officially released in November 2004, Firefox has grown to become the second biggest browser, with a market share of nearly 18%, all platforms combined (Internet Explorer has 75%, to web developers’ great regret). Today, it seems that version 3 of Firefox is just around the corner.

Ulteo Virtual Desktop: Running GNU/Linux in Windows

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Linux 2008 is shaping up to be the year that GNU/Linux hit the Windows desktop. Already the year has seen the first working version of the KDE Windows project, Wubi, which installs Ubuntu to an existing Windows filesystem, and LiveUSB Creator, a wizard for installing the Fedora distribution to a flashdrive from within Windows.

Litrix 8.5 | Brazilian Desktop GNU/Linux Distribution for Home Users

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saleem-khan.blogspot: Litrix 8.5 - International edition was released on Tuesday, 20 May 2008 and is available for download as a single Live DVD of 1.2 GB from the Litrix Linux Home Page. I never had a chance to try the previous versions partly because the English language support was not available by default and partly because it is based on the "scary" Gentoo Linux which looks threatening to home users because of its manual configuration.

Myah OS 3.0 Mouse Pro Released

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The long awaited Myah OS 3.0 is here. 3.0 has been in development since 2006 right after the release of version 2.3. Being completely development from the source up has been quite an undertaking. The initial release is the flagship of the Myah OS range dubbed Mouse Pro. This name is due to the fact that it's built around the XFCE 4.4 desktop, and comes with a complete development environment.

4.1 times more Prettyness

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Ladies and gentlemen, let me introduce you the brand new shiny Plasma theme that will be used for KDE 4.1. Here you can see the new applet and krunner backgrounds, the new panel, our brand-new carbon fiber clock and some items that once upon a time weren't themed at all, like the pager and the taskbar.

Small PCs big news as economy slows

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Hardware Smaller, low-cost PCs are likely to be at the top of the shopping list for technology buyers gathering in Taipei this week for the world's second largest computer fair, as an economic slowdown in the United States forces consumers to cut back on spending.

today's leftovers

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  • UBUNTU Studio Revisited

  • SaxenOS 2008 beta 2 Final Report
  • Going Ubuntu
  • Fedora 9
  • 3.0 Beta and Extensions Show Strong Momentum (PR)
  • The Palm Size Linux Server
  • Cute Lil’ Classmate
  • Is this the cheapest Linux laptop on the planet?
  • The latest in Novell Linux certifications
  • “make” is annoying
  • Get Used to the Command Line in Linux, Part 3

How To Back Up Your Files With Areca On Fedora 9

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Areca is a personal file backup software developed in Java. It allows you to select files or directories to back up, filter, encrypt and compress their content, and store them on your backup location. Areca supports incremental backups and generates backup reports, which can be stored on your disk or sent by email. This guide explains how to install and use it on a Fedora 9 desktop (GNOME).

Linux Outlaws 40 - Software Freedom, Lawsuits & Poker

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OSS In this special episode, we talk to Bradley M. Kuhn of the FSLC & FSC about software freedom, litigation against open source developers, the future and thread of web services that aren’t open, the AGPL and poker.

Compiz and Compiz Fusion 0.7.6 out in wild

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Software Our friends Dennis Kasprzyk and Guillaume Seguin announced the release of Compiz and Compiz Fusion 0.7.6 respectively. As is the tradition we always make a release with a lot of new features and of course eye-candy to go with it.

Are your Firefox extensions proprietary software?

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Moz/FF In the last post I went through the most popular Firefox extensions and talked about whether they were good ideas or not. However, it seems that not a lot of people think about another side to this, i.e. what are your Firefox extensions licenced under?

Also: Firefox 3 RC1 forces you agree to EULA before usage
And: Welcome humans - We have come to visit you in peace and with goodwill!

A Fine Piece: Rhythmbox 0.11.5

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vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: Following audio players reviews like this or this, today I decided to review Rhythmbox 0.11.5, the GNOME audio player. At first glance, Rhythmbox made me a good impression: the layout is simple and clean, similar in many ways to many other players for GNOME, like Banshee, Listen or Exaile.

Linux Flash Player Is GPU Accelerated

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Software Adobe has been using the GPU to accelerate the Flash Player when displaying full-screen content since their December '07 Flash Player update, but with the Flash Player 10 Beta, new GPU acceleration modes are supported -- even on Linux.

Ubuntu still not ready to replace my desktop

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archisgore.blogspot: I've been using Ubuntu for the last couple of months, it still doesn't match the speed-of-use I get from my XP. Speed-of-use isn't always about raw speed of the software. Many times, there are simple UX pieces missing in the media players or GUI config tools which make you go to the command-line occasionally.

What might come of the OOXML revolt?

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OSS It’s late, and in terms of the process it’s hopeless, but the appeals of the ISO vote making Office Open XML (OOXML) an official standard could still have an impact

Ubiquitous Linux, or, how to become a household commodity

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Hardware Whether it was to your taste or not, there’s no denying the ASUS Eee Linux subnotebook was a massive sales success. Demand far exceeded initial production so it’s not surprising competitor models are on their way. And here’s why the hardware manufacturers are going to bring Linux to the masses far in advance of any amount of Ubuntu fanboyism.

some howtos:

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  • How to disable vim syntax highlighting and coloring

  • vim taglist plugin for developers
  • Howto: graphical logout/shutdown/reboot in any Window Manager
  • Synchronizing a BlackBerry in Linux
  • Disable Ctrl+Alt+Backspace from Restarting X Windows on Linux
  • One way to change path on Ubuntu
  • Short Tip: Move an X window in Linux with the Alt key
  • Welcome KDE apps back onto your GNOME desktop
  • Changing the default 'generic' kernel to 'server' kernel
  • Installation of Fedora 9 with Vista on Dell 1525
  • A110 mini-laptop Debian installation HOWTO
  • Tips and Tricks for Using Xen under Ubuntu or Debian
  • Alternative Installation Methods for Hardy
  • Virtualbox 1.6.0 with Ubuntu 8.04 2.6.24-17-generic kernel
  • Howto Set Gnome Calendar First Day of Week in Ubuntu
  • Changing default applications
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat – the open source conglomerate
    As successful companies grow, they accumulate products; new ones are developed and additional ones are acquired. Managing diverse portfolios is a challenge, not least when it comes to putting it all together on a single presentation slide to make it appear there is an overall coherent product strategy.
  • Ericsson Embraces Red Hat OpenStack Platform
    Ericsson and Red Hat today announced a broad alliance to work together on network functions virtualization (NFV) products. And the telco infrastructure provider will now support the Red Hat OpenStack Platform. Ericsson already has a longstanding distribution partnership with Red Hat that includes Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat JBoss Middleware. The existing distribution partnerships define not only commercial terms, but also joint support models, co-engineering and certification testing, and joint go-to-market collaboration.
  • Raleigh's Red Hat teams up with Ericsson
    Open-source software firm Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has teamed up with Ericsson (Nasdaq: ERIC) on what the companies are calling a “broad alliance” aimed at transforming the information and communications technology market. Red Hat, headquartered at downtown Raleigh’s Red Hat Tower, announced that its new partnership with Ericsson would allow the duo to deliver fully open-source and production-ready cloud infrastructure, spanning OpenStack, software-defined networking and software-defined infrastructure.
  • FCAIC in the House
    The job is like many other roles called “Community Manager” or “Community Lead.” That means there is a focus on metrics and experiences. One role is to try ensure smooth forward movement of the project towards its goals. Another role is to serve as a source of information and motivation. Another role is as a liaison between the project and significant downstream and sponsoring organizations. In Fedora, this means I help the Fedora Project Leader. I try to be the yen to his yang, the zig to his zag, or the right hand to his right elbow. In all seriousness, it means that I work on a lot of the non-engineering focused areas of the Fedora Project. While Matthew has responsibility for the project as a whole I try to think about users and contributors and be mechanics of keeping the project running smoothly.
  • keepalived: Simple HA
    We have been using keepalived in Fedora Infrastructure for a while now. It’s a pretty easy to use and simple way to do some basic HA. Keepalived can keep track of which machine is “master” for a IP address and quickly fail over and back when moving that IP address around. You can also run scripts on state change. Keepalived uses VRRP and handles updating arp tables when IP addresses move around. It also supports weighting so you can prefer one or another server to “normally” have the master IP/scripts.
  • What does Factory 2.0 mean for Modularity?
    This blog now has a drop-down category called Modularity. But, many arteries of Modularity lead into a project called Factory 2.0. These two are, in fact, pretty much inseparable. In this post, we’ll talk about the 5 problems that need to be solved before Modularity can really live. The origins of Factory 2.0 go back a few years, when Matthew Miller started the conversation at Flock. The first suggested names were “Fedora Rings”, “Envs and Stacks”, and Alephs.
  • varnish-5.0, varnish-modules-0.9.2 and hitch-1.4.1, packages for Fedora and EPEL
    The Varnish Cache project recently released varnish-5.0, and Varnish Software released hitch-1.4.1. I have wrapped packages for Fedora and EPEL. varnish-5.0 has configuration changes, so the updated package has been pushed to rawhide, but will not replace the ones currently in EPEL nor in Fedora stable. Those who need varnish-5.0 for EPEL may use my COPR repos at They include the varnish-5.0 and matching varnish-modules packages, and are compatible with EPEL 5, 6, and 7.
  • Installroot in DNF-2.0

Security News

  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • More information about Dirty COW (aka CVE-2016-5195)
    The security hole fixed in the stable kernels released today has been dubbed Dirty COW (CVE-2016-5195) by a site devoted to the kernel privilege escalation vulnerability. There is some indication that it is being exploited in the wild. Ars Technica has some additional information. The Red Hat bugzilla entry and advisory are worth looking at as well.
  • CVE-2016-5195
    My prior post showed my research from earlier in the year at the 2016 Linux Security Summit on kernel security flaw lifetimes. Now that CVE-2016-5195 is public, here are updated graphs and statistics. Due to their rarity, the Critical bug average has now jumped from 3.3 years to 5.2 years. There aren’t many, but, as I mentioned, they still exist, whether you know about them or not. CVE-2016-5195 was sitting on everyone’s machine when I gave my LSS talk, and there are still other flaws on all our Linux machines right now. (And, I should note, this problem is not unique to Linux.) Dealing with knowing that there are always going to be bugs present requires proactive kernel self-protection (to minimize the effects of possible flaws) and vendors dedicated to updating their devices regularly and quickly (to keep the exposure window minimized once a flaw is widely known).
  • “Most serious” Linux privilege-escalation bug ever is under active exploit (updated)
    While CVE-2016-5195, as the bug is cataloged, amounts to a mere privilege-escalation vulnerability rather than a more serious code-execution vulnerability, there are several reasons many researchers are taking it extremely seriously. For one thing, it's not hard to develop exploits that work reliably. For another, the flaw is located in a section of the Linux kernel that's a part of virtually every distribution of the open-source OS released for almost a decade. What's more, researchers have discovered attack code that indicates the vulnerability is being actively and maliciously exploited in the wild.
  • Linux users urged to protect against 'Dirty COW' security flaw
    Organisations and individuals have been urged to patch Linux servers immediately or risk falling victim to exploits for a Linux kernel security flaw dubbed ‘Dirty COW'. This follows a warning from open source software vendor Red Hat that the flaw is being exploited in the wild. Phil Oester, the Linux security researcher who uncovered the flaw, explained to V3 that the exploit is easy to execute and will almost certainly become more widely used. "The exploit in the wild is trivial to execute, never fails and has probably been around for years - the version I obtained was compiled with gcc 4.8," he said.
  • Hackers Hit U.S. Senate GOP Committee
    The national news media has been consumed of late with reports of Russian hackers breaking into networks of the Democratic National Committee. Lest the Republicans feel left out of all the excitement, a report this past week out of The Netherlands suggests Russian hackers have for the past six months been siphoning credit card data from visitors to the Web storefront of the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC). [...] Dataflow markets itself as an “offshore” hosting provider with presences in Belize and The Seychelles. Dataflow has long been advertised on Russian-language cybercrime forums as an offshore haven that offers so-called “bulletproof hosting,” a phrase used to describe hosting firms that court all manner of sites that most legitimate hosting firms shun, including those that knowingly host spam and phishing sites as well as malicious software. De Groot published a list of the sites currently present at Dataflow. The list speaks for itself as a collection of badness, including quite a number of Russian-language sites selling synthetic drugs and stolen credit card data. According to De Groot, other sites that were retrofitted with the malware included e-commerce sites for the shoe maker Converse as well as the automaker Audi, although he says those sites and the NRSC’s have been scrubbed of the malicious software since his report was published. But De Groot said the hackers behind this scheme are continuing to find new sites to compromise. “Last Monday my scans found about 5,900 hacked sites,” he said. “When I did another scan two days later, I found about 340 of those had been fixed, but that another 170 were newly compromised.”
  • Thoughts on the BTB Paper
    The Branch Target Buffer (BTB) whitepaper presents some interesting information. It details potential side-channel attacks by utilizing timing attacks against the branch prediction hardware present in Intel Haswell processors. The article does not mention Intel processors later than Haswell, such as Broadwell or Skylake. Side-channel attacks are always interesting and fun. Indeed, the authors have stumbled into areas that need more research. Their research can be applicable in certain circumstances. As a side-note, KASLR in general is rather weak and can be considered a waste of time[1]. The discussion why is outside the scope of this article.

Android Leftovers

Debian-Based Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" Gets First Test Build, Ships GNOME 3.22

Today, October 21, 2016, the developers of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux operating system proudly announced the availability for download of the first test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" release. Read more