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About Tux Machines

Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Samsung rolls out a round, Tizen-based Gear S2 watch Rianne Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 7:51pm
Story GNOME 3.17.91 released! Rianne Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 7:49pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 5:08pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 5:06pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 5:05pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 5:05pm
Story GIMP and GNOME Foundation Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 5:04pm
Story Red Hat Results, Beta Release Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 5:02pm
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 5:01pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 03/09/2015 - 4:58pm

Firefox 4 sneak peek flaunts Google open video codec

Filed under
Moz/FF

theregister.co.uk: Mozilla has turned out a Firefox 4 prototype that includes Google's newly open sourced WebM video format, while Opera has rolled the format into a developer build of its own.

KDE at SouthEast LinuxFest

Filed under
Linux
  • KDE at SouthEast LinuxFest
  • SouthEast LinuxFest Part II
  • Gentoo at LinuxTag 2010: A look back
  • systemd Slides from LinuxTag 2010
  • LinuxTag from my view

Using Gnome-Shell

Filed under
Software

g33q.co.za: Okay, day one, I have a feeling of trepidation – using a beta product for doing real work is risky. I realize I do this at my own risk, and SAVE OFTEN.

Tuxmachines' Fund Raiser

Time has come to ask tuxmachines visitors to reach into their hearts and pockets to contribute to the best Linux news site on the web. Tuxmachines is in real danger of going dark as I type this.

5 Best Linux Software Packages for Kids

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: Even when computers were first being introduced, engineers realized how useful they could be to teach children. Today we’ve gathered together some of the best Linux software applications for kids.

More Free and Open Source Video Editors for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: I would like to feature some more video editing software, which are all capable of handling video sequence editing and provide tools for trimming, colour manipulation, titling, visual effects, splicing, cutting and arranging clips across the timeline among others.

Parted Magic partitioning tool updated

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: Parted Magic developer Patrick Verner has released version 4.11 of his open source, multi-platform partitioning tool. Parted Magic can be used to create, move, delete and resize drive partitions.

Deep-protocol analysis of UNIX networks

Filed under
HowTos

Some UNIX protocols need investigation to understand what they are doing and what information they are exchanging. In this article, we will take a look at techniques for performing detailed analysis of the protocols in use on your UNIX network.

The open-source entrepreneur

Filed under
Linux

bbc.co.uk: Bob Young is a self-confessed contrarian with a strong desire to change the world by allowing people to share and collaborate. The approach has served him well and has helped turn the Canadian into a multi-millionaire.

Linux versus the world: The unwinnable war?

Filed under
Linux

linuxuser.co.uk: The first three months of the year were defined, in the technology sector, by some very scary numbers. Just feast your eyes on some of these.

Why do FLOSS advocates like Adobe so much?

Filed under
OSS

blog.flameeyes.eu: I’m not sure how this happens, but I see more and more often FLOSS advocates that support Adobe, and in particular Flash, in almost any context out there, mostly because they are now appearing a lot like an underdog, with Microsoft and Apple picking on them.

Spreading the Linux blogger love: Five questions for Ghabuntu.

Filed under
Linux

This is Luqman Saeed, owner & operator of Ghabuntu.com -- he's been an avid supporter of my blog on Facebook and fairly active in the comments as of late. So what kind of host would I be if I didn't introduce him to you all?

More here...

Binary Portability in Linux

Filed under
Linux

nicolasb.com.ar: An interesting topic for a change: is Linux binary portable? That is, can we take a binary file and be sure it’ll run in any other Linux system? What happens if we broaden that to any POSIX system, will it blend? Eh, I mean, will it run?

Mandriva in the storm…

Filed under
MDV

olivier-mejean.fr: Mandriva team is at the moment in a very bad situation. These last days, the projects have emerged and tensions were very high among employees of Mandriva.

Ubuntu 10.04 review

Filed under
Ubuntu

techradar.com: After five years of faithful service, Brown is out – and that goes for Ubuntu too. That earthen, muddy hue that was supposed to remind us of our shared humanity and the real meaning of 'ubuntu' has been consigned to Linux history.

Postfix Monitoring With Mailgraph And pflogsumm On Debian Lenny

Filed under
HowTos

This article describes how you can monitor your Postfix mailserver with the tools Mailgraph and pflogsumm. Mailgraph creates daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly graphs of sent, received, bounced, and rejected emails and also of spam and viruses, if SpamAssassin and ClamAV are integrated into Postfix (e.g. using amavisd-new). These graphs can be accessed with a browser, whereas pflogsumm ("Postfix Log Entry Summarizer") can be used to send reports of Postfix activity per email.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Indicator applets now work with awn
  • gThumb Brings Better Photo Browsing and Importing to Linux
  • The Linux Action Show! s12e05
  • Podcast: Hacking with Open Source
  • Manatee County, Fla., Preps New Internet Portal Built on Open Source
  • How Can Linux Out-'Fabulous' Apple?
  • Opera 10.6: WebM Video, HTML5 and More Speed
  • An Open Source Weekend
  • Who uses Linux?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • useful uses of ‘dig’
  • How to make a photograph Lomographic in GIMP
  • Installing PowerDNS Recursor
  • Firewall your Fedora
  • Chown Tutorial
  • How-To: Disable pulseaudio and sound in GDM
  • John the Ripper on a Ubuntu 10.04 MPI Cluster
  • Analyzing Linux kernel crash dumps with crash
  • The Magic ~: Bash Tilde Expansion with 5 Examples
  • Introduction to iptables
  • Five Simple Photo Fixes with digiKam
  • Mailbox: does GCC miscompile at -O0?
  • OpenOffice.org Resource Files
  • Make a Drive Image Using an Ubuntu Live CD
  • HOWTO: Installing Ubuntu Packages Offline
  • Avoiding Installation Problems on the HP Mini 110 and Mini 210
  • Emulating 8051 serial port communication on Linux
  • Unable to update Ubuntu 10.04 using proxy connection – “No address associated with hostname”

Wireless router tech support – Linksys vs. D-Link

Filed under
Hardware

dwasifar.com: Recently my Linksys wireless-N router became flaky. I needed a new router.

A wake up call for sleepy Linux users.

Filed under
Security

toolbox.com/blog: The alarm has rung several times before and each time the snooze button was pressed. This time, just recently, the alarm has rung with yet another compromised download resulting in another Linux trojan back door. The time has come for us to stop hitting that snooze button.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

OSS, Openwashing and More

  • Speak at Open Source Summit Europe – Submit by July 1
    Open Source Summit Europe is the leading technical conference for professional open source. Join developers, sysadmins, DevOps professionals, architects and community members, to collaborate and learn about the latest open source technologies, and to gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions.
  • MariaDB launches Oracle compatible enterprise open source database
    Enterprise computing has often been reliant on proprietary database architecture, but this can be both complex and costly, putting up a barrier to innovation. Now open source database specialist MariaDB is launching its latest enterprise offering with Oracle compatibility. This allows existing Oracle Database users to reuse existing code and established skill sets when migrating applications or deploying new ones. MariaDB TX 3.0 introduces built-in, system-versioned tables, enabling developers to easily build temporal features into applications. This eliminates the need to manually create columns, tables and triggers in order to maintain row history, freeing DBAs to simply create new tables with system versioning or alter existing tables to add it, streamlining the process significantly. Developers can query a table with standard SQL to see what data looked like at a previous point in time, such as looking at a customer's profile history to see how preferences have changed over time.
  • MariaDB TX 3.0 Delivers First Enterprise Open Source Database to Beat Oracle, Microsoft and IBM
    MariaDB® Corporation today announced the release of MariaDB TX 3.0, the first enterprise open source database solution to deliver advanced features that, until now, required expensive, proprietary and complex databases.
  • 5 Open-Source SQL IDEs for You to Learn and Explore
    If you’ve done a lot with SQL, you’ve probably used some form of SQL IDE to help you complete that work. Yes, it’s possible to do everything in SQL from the command line; but creating or even maintaining databases and tables that way is an exercise in masochism. There are some nice commercial IDEs such as dbArtisan and SQL Server’s Management Studio, but IDEs is one area where open-source can do just as well (or in some cases, even better).
  • LibreOffice 6.1 Branches & Now Under Feature Freeze, LibreOffice 6.2 On Master
    LibreOffice has reached its hard feature freeze and branching period with the first beta release being imminent. As of yesterday is now the libreoffice-6-1 branch for continued with on this next open-source office suite while the Git master code is tracking what will later become LibreOffice 6.2.
  • Securing Third-Party and Open Source Code Components: A Primer [Ed: Citing, as usual, firms that try to sell their proprietary software by badmouthing FOSS]
    The increasing popularity of open source code continues to be a boon for developers across the industry, allowing them to increase efficiency and streamline delivery. But there are security risks to be considered when leveraging open source and commercial code components, as each carries with it a significant risk of becoming the enemy within, creating a vulnerability in the program it helps build.
  • FOSSID Awarded Grant for Artificial Intelligence in Open Source Auditing by Sweden's Government Agency for Innovation
  • Intel AI Lab open-sources library for deep learning-driven NLP
    The Intel AI Lab has open-sourced a library for natural language processing to help researchers and developers give conversational agents like chatbots and virtual assistants the smarts necessary to function, such as name entity recognition, intent extraction, and semantic parsing to identify the action a person wants to take from their words. Just a few months old, the Intel AI Lab plans to open-source more libraries to help developers train and deploy artificial intelligence, publish research, and reproduce the latest innovative techniques from members of the AI research community in order to “push AI and deep learning into domains it’s not a part of yet.”
  • 'monitor mode for iwm(4)'
  • FSFE Newsletter - May 2018
    Following a more than a decade long tradition, the FSFE once again led its annual Free Software Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW) in Barcelona, Spain, as a meeting point for world-leading legal exper...
  • 24 best free security tools

Firefox 63 Plans and Mozilla's Error Code Plans

  • Firefox 63 to Get Improved Tracking Protection That Blocks In-Browser Miners
    Mozilla developers are working on an improved Tracking Protection system for the Firefox browser that will land in version 63, scheduled for release in mid-October. Tracking Protection is a feature that blocks Firefox from loading scripts from abusive trackers. It was first launched with Firefox's Private Browsing mode a few years back, but since Firefox 57, released in November 2017, users can enable it for normal browsing sessions at any time.
  • Firefox 63 To Block Cryptojackers With Advanced Tracking Protection
    It has been reported by Bleeping Computer, a security blog, that Firefox 63 will be launched with an improved tracking protection system to ward off the threats and security concerns posed by in-browser miners. With the surge in incidents involving mining malware trying to use your CPU power to perform some CPU-intensive calculations for their own benefit, many browsers have raised their guards by providing additional security features. (You can read more about blocking cryptocurrency mining in your browser in our earlier published article.)
  • What’s the 411 on 404 messages: Internet error messages explained
    Nothing’s worse than a broken website. Well, maybe an asteroid strike. Or a plague. So maybe a broken website isn’t the end of the world, but it’s still annoying. And it’s even more annoying not knowing what those weird error messages mean. That’s why we’ve decoded the most common HTTP error messages.

OpenStack News/Leftovers

  • Canonical founder calls out OpenStack suppliers for ‘lack of focus’ on datacentre cost savings
    The OpenStack supplier community’s reluctance to prioritise the delivery of datacentre cost savings to their users could prove “fatal”, says Canonical co-founder Mark Shuttleworth.
  • OpenStack in transition
    OpenStack is one of the most important and complex open-source projects you’ve never heard of. It’s a set of tools that allows large enterprises ranging from Comcast and PayPal to stock exchanges and telecom providers to run their own AWS-like cloud services inside their data centers. Only a few years ago, there was a lot of hype around OpenStack as the project went through the usual hype cycle. Now, we’re talking about a stable project that many of the most valuable companies on earth rely on. But this also means the ecosystem around it — and the foundation that shepherds it — is now trying to transition to this next phase.
  • Free OpenStack Training Resources
  • How the OpenStack Foundation Is Evolving Beyond Its Roots
    The OpenStack Foundation is in a period of transition as it seeks to enable a broader set of open infrastructure efforts than just the OpenStack cloud project itself. In a video interview at the OpenStack Summit here, OpenStack Foundation Executive Director Jonathan Bryce and Chief Operating Officer Mark Collier discussed how the open-source organization is still thriving, even as corporate sponsorship changes and attendance at events declines. At the event, Collier said there were approximately 2,600 registered attendees, which is nearly half the number that came to the OpenStack Boston 2017 event. OpenStack's corporate sponsorship has also changed, with both IBM and Canonical dropping from the Platinum tier of membership.