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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Building My Own Ubuntu matthartley 05/09/2015 - 8:46pm
Story Updated Debian 7: 7.9 released Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 7:35pm
Story 7 Linux Distros You Can Run on the Raspberry Pi 2 Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 7:30pm
Story Btrfs For Linux 4.3 Has TRIM & RAID 5/6 Fixes Roy Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 8:34am
Story Five Ways Open Source Databases Are Best for Business Roy Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 8:28am
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Received Well by Ubuntu Phone Users, Work on OTA-7 Starts Roy Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 8:24am
Story Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Ship with OpenStack Liberty Roy Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 8:22am
Story Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 15.10 Highlights [VIDEO] Roy Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 8:18am
Story Improving Security for Bugzilla Roy Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 8:08am
Story RHEL 7.2 has an updated kernel target Rianne Schestowitz 05/09/2015 - 7:55am

The New OS/2 Rumours Could Be Interesting

Filed under
OS

linuxjournal.com: Some rumours have emerged that IBM is considering an OS/2 comeback and I'm filled with the same mixed feelings that always emerge whenever the subject is raised. Would I want OS/2 back on my desktop now?

Ubuntu Maverick changes

Filed under
Ubuntu

mybroadband.co.za: Every six months Ubuntu releases a new version. October's proposed release includes a few key changes

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Review: Ubuntu Linux 10.04 – It just works
  • Red Hat Announces Finalists in Fourth Annual Innovation Awards
  • How can the Flexibility of Open Source and the Assurance of Proprietary Software Coexist?
  • Canonical's (Possibly) Excellent Adventure
  • Red Hat's revenue glass ceiling is its own making
  • "Smart Reuse With Open Source"
  • Jolicloud: Ubuntu Linux Touch Screens Meet the Cloud
  • BOSS is Nobody's Boss!
  • Linux User kernel column #88
  • Open source brings new meaning to user-generated content
  • Norwegian Free Software Center Opposes Government Pro-FOSS Policy

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Audio Recording in Linux: An Introduction [PART 1]
  • Tweak your RGBA enabled desktop
  • Boot-Up Manager (BUM) - Graphical runlevel editor
  • BackupPC not graphing? Pool size won't shrink? Try this
  • How to change background color to transparent in GIMP
  • gnome-terminal empty
  • Using Symantec NetBackp With Fedora
  • Convert a PDF file into a single Image using ImageMagick
  • Cloning With Linux 3 Ways
  • Using rdist to copy files to multiple hosts
  • Transfer Installed Packages to New Computer or Drive in Ubuntu
  • Auto-hide cursor when idle in Ubuntu
  • Perl Array Reference and Dereference Tutorial With Examples

Does Firefox Have Cooties?

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Does Firefox Have Cooties?
  • Firefoxers howl as privacy add-on auto updates with 'bloatware'
  • The real Chrome threat to Firefox
  • New Firefox 4 ‘Minefield’ beta sports WebM video and tweaked UI

Four console document converters

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I am cursed as a member of middle management, which means part of my responsibility in real life is to filter the resumes of potential employees. It gives me the chance to mess with document converters.

A Review Of MeeGo v1.0: Is It Good Enough For Your Netbook?

maketecheasier.com: When I first set out to try MeeGo, I had hoped to boot up the live USB image on my netbook. What I soon discovered, however, is that it would not work.

ntris: an idea taken a step too far

Filed under
Gaming

blog.ksplice.com: About nine months ago, I lost a lot of free time to a little applet called Pentris. The addition of pentomino pieces made the gameplay quite different from the original falling block game, but I couldn’t help but think that Pentris didn’t go far enough.

Gaming box lets Linux play the slots

Filed under
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: Acrosser announced a PC that can run Linux inside arcade gaming consoles or slot machines. The ACE-S8700 includes golden finger and ccTalk interfaces, a VGA output, four serial ports, plus an intrusion logger and up to 512KB of battery-backed static RAM.

Redshift Keeps Your Eyes Sharp & Helps You Sleep

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: If you spend a lot of time looking at your computer – and if you read this blog I’m betting you do – you might notice that after a while your eyes start to hurt, and that you have trouble going to sleep at night. There’s a good reason for this:

Ubuntu 10.04 Upgrade: Best Practices Checklist

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

itworld.com: ave you been thinking about upgrading your computer to Ubuntu 10.04? I recently made the leap, at the prompting of my Update Manager. The process went fairly smoothly, but I did have to deal with a couple of minor annoyances. Here are a few tips.

Issue three of the 'International Free and Open Source Software Law Review'

Filed under
OSS

ifosslr.org: The Editorial Committee is delighted to announce issue three of the 'International Free and Open Source Software Law Review' (IFOSS L. Rev.) is now available.

The fragile balance between fast and reliable

Filed under
Linux
Software

hwoarang.silverarrow.org: Being a Distro developer, or a packager if you prefer, is not always that simple. Many people think that our “job” is quite straight forward. All we need to do is to read the INSTALL file and then adapt the instructions into an ebuild format and we are done. Well it is definitely more than that.

epic moment: free and fast graphics at last

Filed under
Hardware
Software

vizzzion.org/blog: Well, epic for a Free software geek. I’m now running openSUSE on my desktop, which has an AMD RadeonHD 4350 card. So, what’s the epic moment?

Serve Up Your Music with Zeya

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxjournal.com: Have you always wanted to set up your own music station to stream your latest music collection to your friends or colleagues? Have you been thinking lately of setting up an always-on music streaming server so that you can just open up your web browser and listen to your favorite tracks?

Heroes of Newerth - Charge!

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: Linux games are many and varied. You can find pretty much anything you need, from simple arcades via racing all the way to expansive and elaborate tactical shooters. Still, one aspect of the Linux gaming scene is underplayed, this being the Real Time Strategy (RTS). However, that is about to change.

Open Source: The capitalists' choice

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: I often hear people referring to Open Source and Free Software advocates jokingly, or not so jokingly, as "communists" or "hippies". Rubbish!

All hail the easy to use!

Filed under
Linux

I've run Linux since before the turn of the century. I know Linux. I love the commandline. But after 10 years of fiddling, I've come to realize one significant thing.

openSUSE 11.3 RC1 is available

Filed under
SUSE

Soyuz Launch Vehicle in Blender: Part I, Modelling the Core Stage

Filed under
HowTos

For Lunatics, we need several space vehicles. The Soyuz launch vehicle is one of these, and it was relatively easy to model. In Part I, I’ll demonstrate the basic modelling techniques I used to create the Core Stage.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more