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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ten Suggestions For The GNOME Camp srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 11:59pm
Story Ubuntu vs Linux Mint srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 11:58pm
Story Linux on the (consumer) Desktop srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 11:44pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 473 srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 8:03pm
Story 'A Week with Windows 8' and Other Tales of Linuxy Virtue srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 8:00pm
Story Grudge Match: Ubuntu 12.10 vs openSUSE 12.2 srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 7:58pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 4:28am
Story Xfce 4.12 Planned For March, GTK3 Still Uncertain srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 4:21am
Story From Linux to OSX - 1 Year Later srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 4:20am
Story OpenSUSE 12.2: Better than Kubuntu or PCLOS srlinuxx 10/09/2012 - 1:10am

sudo, or not sudo: that is the question

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you've dabbled even a little bit with security matters, you know that giving root rights or the root password to a common user is a bad idea. But what do you do if a user has a valid need to do something that absolutely requires root rights? The answer is simple: use sudo to grant the user the needed permissions without letting him have the root password, and limit access to a minimum.

Debian made this developer unhappy

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

itwire.com: One look at Matthew Garrett and you start wondering: is this the guy who caused such a big furore in the FOSS community in September 2006 when he made plain his reasons for leaving the Debian GNU/Linux project after four years as a developer?

Vector Linux 5.9 Standard Gold Review

Filed under
Linux

simplyjat.blogspot: VectorLinux is a Linux distribution for the x86 platform based on Slackware which aims to be user-friendly. According to the project website: Speed, performance, stability -- these are attributes that set Vector Linux apart in the crowded field of Linux distributions.

The seven largest Open Source deals ever

Filed under
OSS

royal.pingdom.com: To say that there were some noise on the Web when Sun recently bought MySQL for $1 billion would be an understatement, to say the least. It’s the largest open source deal ever, and the latest in a series of large open source acquisitions. Here are the seven largest deals that we could find the numbers for:

Top 10 Ubuntu-based Distributions

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: You know what Ubuntu is. There are enough (or not) Linux distributions derived from Ubuntu, so we thought it will be a very good idea to make a list with all of them, or at least the popular ones.

Mobile World Congress preview: The year of Linux

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk: Valentine's Day is just around the corner and, if it's that time of year again, it's time again for 3GSM. What will certainly be the subject of much interest and debate is the evolution and potential of mobile Linux.

OLPC XO - Detailed Review

Filed under
OLPC

bioslevel.com: Through the Give One Get One program (G1G1), residents of North America are able donate $400 to the OLPC foundation, $200 of which finances a laptop for a child, and $200 of which pays for the cost of delivering one to the donor. Colin Dean was one of the first to participate in G1G1, and this is his review of it.

Why MySQL sold out

Filed under
Software

goingon.com: At MySQL there were few things we loved as much as the thought of being our own masters. At times it was difficult –even chaotic, but we loved it even more for that reason. It created a passion and strength inside the company. So why did we change our minds in a few short weeks?

In Defense and Praise of Debian

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb.com: Every now and then, someone suggests that Debian GNU/Linux should be more commercial. To further this goal, some create derivative distros like Linspire, Ubuntu, or Xandros, or organizations like the stillborn DCC Alliance. Others act as pundits, whispering advice from off-stage, like Debian founder Ian Murdock, or, more recently, columnist Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols.

Hitting Microsoft Where It Hurts

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxinsider.com: The real battle between Microsoft and Google -- now in conflict over Microsoft's US$44.6 billion bid for Yahoo -- ultimately isn't over search. Search is the source of Google's revenue and its growth. However, it's pouring that money into things that scare Microsoft even more.

Real World Open Source Video Editing

Filed under
Movies

A short while ago I wrote a review about Open Movie Editor. Essentially this review was written after a couple of hours testing various video clips and assessing the functionality within OME. Now, I can write about what OME is like on a real editing assignment.

Mandriva Directory Server On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up the Mandriva Directory Server (MDS) on Debian Etch. The resulting system provides a full-featured office server for small and medium companies - easy to administer via the web-based Mandriva Management Console (MMC).

Why can't free software GUIs be empowering instead of limiting?

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: It’s one of the more popular culture wars in the free software community: GUI versus CLI. Programmers, by selection, inclination, and long experience, understandably are attracted to textual interactions with the computer, but the text interface was imposed originally by technological limitations. The GUI was introduced as a reply to those problems.

Use dvdisaster to protect backups on optical media

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Storing backups on optical media such as DVD-R discs suffers from two major drawbacks: DVD discs are easy to scratch, and the media itself degrades after a while. You can deal with the scratching issue by careful handing of the media, but even expensive media becomes unreadable over time. Dvdisaster aims to help you recover the information off scratched and aged media.

City Simulation Games For Linux

Filed under
Gaming

maketecheasier.com: For sure, not everyone love gaming in Linux, and there are even fewer people who love city simulation games in Linux. But if you are like me, a lover of city simulation game (and also using Linux), here are some great choices for you:

Enterprise OS emerges above platform layer

Filed under
OSS

itweb.co.za: With government adoption of the Open Document Format and increasing tension between the proprietary and open source vendor spheres, 2008 promises to be an interesting year for open source software and standards.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Open source, the Access slayer

  • FAQ: Secrets to Running Multiple Operating Systems
  • One Laptop Per New York City Middle School Student
  • DreamWorks wins an award for its innovative use of Linux
  • Rebelling against insanity: Wicd requires half of GNOME
  • screenshots from the openbox menu
  • Unix Tip: How-to rename an oddball file
  • Vino, Meet Security
  • Installing Imagick extension for PHP in Ubuntu 7.10
  • Using Ubuntu to Bust Movie Pirates: Fair or Not?
  • Free eBook: Unix for the Beginning Mage
  • Linux stack vendor announces first hardware partner
  • Ubuntu 8.04 “Hardy” Quick Review - Uncomplicated Firewall
  • Where open source is most vital
  • Linux.com chats with new OpenSUSE community manager
  • USB MiniMe 2008 install from Windows

If Torvalds quit Linux would anyone notice?

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: If Linus Torvalds stepped away from his position as coordinator of the Linux kernel, it is unlikely many people would notice, according to the man himself.

Btrfs 0.12, Performance Improvements

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap: "I wasn't planning on releasing v0.12 yet, and it was supposed to have some initial support for multiple devices. But, I have made a number of performance fixes and small bug fixes, and I wanted to get them out there before the (destabilizing) work on multiple-devices took over," explained Chris Mason.

Future CloudBooks to Have Touch, SSD, 22-inch Screens?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Interviews

blog.laptopmag.com: Everex’s first $399 ultraportable CloudBook is set to go on sale on February 15 at Walmart.com. The low-cost laptop takes direct aim at Asus’ Eee PC. But will Everex’s larger hard drive, better web-cam and a new improved Linux OS outshine the popular Eee PC?

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