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Friday, 29 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How to effectively address the free software community

Filed under
OSS

Rudd-O: Winds of change are sweeping through the software industry. Today, it’s no longer fashionable to decry free software types as it was just a few years ago — the cool kids are all “leveraging” and reaching out to free software communities. But not everyone’s doing it right, so let’s explore how to start a positive relationship with free software.

Fluxbox Stable 1.0 Released

Filed under
Fluxbox

Fluxbox.net: A new stable release! Finally after almost four and a half years with 0.9.x release we got to 1.0.0! This release includes a lot of bugfixes, new styles, updated language support, better shaped corners and much more.

sniffing a few distros, part 2

Filed under
Linux

beranger: While several people are rushing into openSUSE 10.3 ("too good to skip", said this guy), I have kept my desktop's openSUSE 10.2 mostly unused, as I have been using Fedora 7 on my laptop, and then I replaced it with several RHEL5 clones...

A Mandrivan's First Look at openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
MDV
SUSE

Frederik's Blog: I downloaded the OpenSUSE 10.3 DVD to test it out and compare it with Mandriva 2008.0. I was interested in reviewing the current state of this distribution and maybe also get some inspiration for improvements I can propose for Mandriva 2008.1.

A Death Threat From A Puppy Linux Supporter

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: I’ve just been informed by e-mail that not only are some defenders of Puppy Linux flaming me on the new DistroWatch Weekly comments but one actually issued a death threat against me for being “negative” about his or her favorite distribution.

Hacking openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

softwareinreview.com: Novell's openSUSE 10.3 is an exciting desktop operating environment that includes or supports nearly every program you need for work and play. But there are those last few programs and issues that make openSUSE just short of perfect. Web browser plugins for some kinds of online content; Windows Media and DVD movie playback support; and drivers for Atheros wireless devices and Nvidia and ATI video cards are the chief things holding openSUSE back for some users. This guide will help you remove as many of those barriers as possible.

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux caught sleeping on the job

  • Basic Linux Tips & Tricks, part 2
  • Linux: Monitor hard disks temperature with hddtemp
  • Installing an Ubuntu monitoring system with Cacti, Zenoss and Smokeping
  • How to Run Web Applications Seamlessly on Ubuntu
  • How to Install Compiz in Debian
  • Show the List of Installed Packages on Ubuntu or Debian

Novell Delivers Open Enterprise Server 2

Filed under
SUSE

opensource.sys-con.com: Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 is now available to customers worldwide. Open Enterprise Server 2 features full 64-bit support of software services previously found only on NetWare, along with storage management enhancements and NetWare virtualization.

Also: Novell Sparkles in OpenSUSE Update

Supporting More Partitions!

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "15 partitions (at least for sd_mod devices) are too few," Jan Engelhardt suggested along with a patch to try and make the mounting of an unlimited number of partitions possible. H. Peter Anvin proposed as an alternative, "now when we have 20-bit minors, can't we simply recycle some of the higher bits for additional partitions, across the board?

Also: Load Balancing Cpusets

Some openSUSE 10.3 Misconceptions

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: There are some misconceptions floating around about openSUSE 10.3. Unfortunately uninformed people are still allowed to blog Eye-wink so let me pick up some I read:

Also: People of openSUSE: Christian Boltz

Educating the masses and squabbling at the distrotech

The user doesn’t care what the operating system is, they are not installing it to use an operating system, they are installing it for the things they can install and run on it… can they use their word, excel, PowerPoint docs… how? Can they play their CDs? How? Can they watch a DVD from their collection? How? If all those names, IBM, Novell etc, were shown in an ad, people would have a lot more confidence to try and see. That’s all Linux needs them to do, try one. Any one. They are all united under the march of the penguin.

Customize your Emacs world

Filed under
News

This tutorial walks you through some of the useful ways you can customize and configure the Emacs environment. Learn how to change everything about the Emacs environment to your liking, from the behavior of minor modes to the default key bindings.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 223

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Puppy Linux 3.00

  • News: openSUSE 10.3 released, Mandriva 2008 seeded, Ubuntu 7.10 available for pre-order, Judd Vinet resigns as Arch Linux project leader
  • Released last week: openSUSE 10.3, Zenwalk Linux 4.8
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2008, Frugalware Linux 0.7
  • New distributions: Alegna Linux, Elbuntu, KinuX Linux, Linius, Mythbuntu
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Dell Preps for Next Linux Desktop Release

Filed under
Ubuntu

TechIQ: A major desktop Linux upgrade is set to be released on October 18. Michael Dell is expected to personally use it. And the PC giant will pre-load it on selected desktops and notebooks. Buzz about this next Linux release — dubbed Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon — is growing across the web. But what exactly does Gutsy Gibbon (aka Ubuntu 7.10) offer to desktop customers and solutions providers? Here’s a look.

Also: Ubuntu 7.10 should make Dell happy

“Is a cursory look at the CentOS LIVE CD worth every penny?”

Filed under
Misc

Enterprise Linux Log: The review in question in this case is one for CentOS 5. Or, I should say, it is a review for the CentOS 5 LiveCD that proclaims to be a review for the enterprise release of CentOS. It’s an important distinction to make and, if you’re trying to catch a break as a Linux review site, you should probably know the difference before your fingers hit the keys to type out a headline.

"Novell is not forking OpenOffice"

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: From recent media reports, casual readers could easily believe that OpenOffice.org, the popular free office suite, is fragmenting. Slashdot reported last week that Novell is backing an official fork, while Ars Technica suggested that if what was happening fell short of a fork, then it was still "serious fragmentation" and "not a good thing for the OpenOffice.org community." However, a closer look at the situation shows that what is happening is less of a dramatic split than the airing of long-time grievances and the media's discovery of a long-established institution.

Thunderbird Process of Change Part 1

Filed under
Moz/FF

mitchell's blog: In the coming months there will be a lot of discussion about how mail and Thunderbird will evolve. There will also be more detailed discussions about the new organizational home as we move from plans to concreteness. This seems a good time to describe how we got to where we are today.

Open Source Gaming Review: Wormux 0.8

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: For anyone who ever loved and played the famous Worms PC game series, then Wormux is the game for you. Even if you weren't much of a fan (like myself) of the original Works series, you'll find Wormux none the less captivating and enjoyable, and even addictive in some respects.

Managing and configuring downloads with KGet

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftware mag: Downloading—no matter what operating system you are using—is ubiquitous. If you’ve been on the internet you will have downloaded something at some point. This article will take a detailed look at KGet, a very versatile GUI download manager for the KDE desktop which is easy to use and has plenty of easily configurable options.

Licensing for laymen - GPL explained

Filed under
OSS

tectonic: The GPL was first developed by Free Software Foundation founder, Richard Stallman in 1989. The licence challenged standard proprietary licences, supplanting the familiar copyright with copyleft.

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More in Tux Machines

Why and how I became a software engineer

Throughout my experiences, the fascinating weeks I'd spent writing out DOS commands remained a prominent influence, bleeding into little side projects and occupying valuable study time. As soon as Geocities became available to all Yahoo! Users, I created a website where I published blurry pictures that I'd taken on a tiny digital camera. I created websites for free, helped friends and family fix issues they had with their computers, and created a library database for a church. This meant that I was always researching and trying to find more information about how things could be made better. The Internet gods blessed me and open source fell into my lap. Suddenly, 30-day trials and restrictive licenses became a ghost of computing past. I could continue to create using GIMP, Inkscape, and OpenOffice. Read more

Linux Kernel 3.18.32 LTS Released with Btrfs, EXT4, ARM, x86, and PA-RISC Fixes

Immediately after announcing today the release of Linux kernel 4.1.23 LTS, and after informing us yesterday about the availability of Linux kernel 3.12.59 LTS, kernel developer Sasha Levin now published details about Linux kernel 3.18.32 LTS. Read more

Linux greybeards release beta of systemd-free Debian fork

The effort to create a systemd-free Debian fork has borne fruit, with a beta of “Devuan Jessie” appearing in the wild. Devuan came into being after a rebellion by a self-described “Veteran Unix Admin collective” argued that Debian had betrayed its roots and was becoming too desktop-oriented. The item to which they objected most vigorously was the inclusion of the systemd bootloader. The rebels therefore decided to fork Debian and “preserve Init freedom”. The group renamed itself and its distribution “Devuan” and got work, promising a fork that looked, felt, and quacked like Debian in all regards other than imposing systemd as the default Init option. Read more

GNOME Builder 3.20.2 Arrives with LLVM 3.8, FreeBSD and OpenBSD Support

The developers behind the GNOME Builder IDE (Integrated Development Environment) pushed earlier to updates of the software to the stable and devel channels, GNOME Build 3.20.2 and 3.21.1. Read more