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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Dies on April 30, Users Are Urged to Upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS via Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 6:55pm
Story Tutanota, An Open Source Encrypted Gmail Alternative, Heads Out Of Beta Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 6:46pm
Story Linux Mint Debian Edition 2 Cinnamon and MATE Release Candidates Available for Download Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 6:35pm
Story Kubuntu 15.04 Heating up Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 6:31pm
Story OpenSSH 6.8 released Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 5:48pm
Story Q4OS Is a Bare-Bones Business Tool Rianne Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 5:41pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 5:24pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 5:23pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 5:21pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 18/03/2015 - 5:19pm

World of Goo Turns One, Goes on Sale for… Whatever You Want to Pay

Filed under
Gaming

maximumpc.com: World of Goo, the most adorable game we’ve ever played cool game for cool people from 2D Boy, is officially one year old! Hooray! Oh, what’s that? You don’t own one or more copies of World of Goo? Well then, it’s your lucky day, because – until October 19 – the game’s price is, like its titular amorphous heroes, bending to your will.

The best free open source software for Mac OS X

Filed under
Software
OSS

computerworld.com: Most Mac lovers love the Mac for the carefully wrought user interfaces and the crisp design, and never pay attention to the open source at the heart of the operating system. But underneath this beautiful facade is a heart built upon the rich -- if often chaotic -- world of open source software.

A First Glimpse Of Chrome OS In The Flesh

Filed under
OS

techcrunch.com: Following our post about Chrome OS yesterday, it looks like those wily folks at Google have removed the “chromeos” folder from the Chromium build folder. Too bad. But luckily, before they did, TechCrunch reader and Linux user, Jonathan Frederickson, was able to grab the code and managed to install it.

What's new with Open Source for America?

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Open Source for America (OSFA) was announced as a coalition to encourage U.S. federal government support of, and participation in, open source projects and technologies. If that sounds like a broad-reaching goal, it is. Nearly three months after the group's debut, I was interested to learn what progress OSFA has made toward this goal.

E-Banking on a Locked Down (Non-Microsoft) PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

voices.washingtonpost.com: What follows is a brief tutorial on how to do that with Ubuntu, one of the more popular bootable Linux installations.

Right Click Movies To Download Subtitles In Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Tired of searching Google for movie subtitles and just wanted to find them in the folder where you keep your movies? Now you can, by using Periscope, which is a Python script that integrates into Nautilus and all you have to do is right click.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The desktop as a cluster of services?
  • ChromeOS to be based on Debian
  • Free Software for Africa
  • UbuntuOne Gets A (Rubbish) New Icon
  • Open Innovation Awards: Kaltura
  • Are App Stores Evil?
  • Stable kernel updates 2.6.27.37 and 2.6.31.4
  • How the U.S. funds open source abroad
  • Convert any computer to a virtual machine with Linux and Clonezilla
  • Icculus Provides An Update, But No UT3 Or Games

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Compiling GIMP 2.7/git-master with Ubuntu 9.04/9.10
  • HAL configuration for Kingsis Peripherals Evoluent VerticalMouse 3
  • Mouse shortcuts with xbindkeys
  • Monitoring MySQL servers using mytop
  • How to connect to Rackspace Cloud Files via ServiceNET
  • How To Start Nepomuk/Strigi and Fix The Strigi “Service failed to initialize"
  • unp – Unpack (almost) everything with one command
  • How to make text wrap around a graphic proportionately in OOo
  • Run your own Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud, part 3
  • Tech Tip: Send an Email Alert When Your Disk Space Gets Low
  • Changing the Metacity button order
  • Mplayer as default DVD player in KDE 4
  • Speed up Emerge by compiling in RAM with tmpfs
  • Tip: Keep a command out of your history

Windows 7 vs Ubuntu 9.10 vs OS X 10.6

Filed under
OS

lunduke.com: October is a big month for computer nerds. Windows 7 (October 22nd) and Ubuntu 9.10 (October 29th) will both be released. But which should you use? Which is the best for your particular needs? Let’s take a look.

ah, kde stats

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Cornelius posted a neat summary of the source code heft in KDE's main modules. Michael Meeks posted an blog entry showing other projects' line count next to KDE's while asking "the real question is not 'is KDE valuable' - of course it is; but how does it compare[?]"

World's smallest Linux networking server?

Filed under
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: Lantronix announced its latest XPort embedded networking module, which it touts as the "world's smallest Linux networking server." The XPort Pro measures 1.33 x 0.64 x 0.53 inches, and offers 8MB of SDRAM, 16MB of flash, RJ45 Ethernet and serial ports, a web server, SSH and SSL security, and IPv6 support.

It’s now final: Fedora 12 ditches Pidgin for Empathy

Filed under
Linux
Software

digitizor.com: There already has been words about Empathy replacing Pidgin as the default IM client in both Ubuntu 9.10 and Fedora 12. We are not sure whether Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic will have it or not but Fedora 12 is going to have Empathy as it’s default IM client for sure.

Also: Fedora 12 Beta: the final sprint

Designing Labels and Cards with Scribus

Filed under
Software
HowTos

blog.worldlabel.com: Scribus is free software page-layout tool applicable to designing all sort of documents: from newspaper ads to fliers to whole books. Because it can precisely position both images and text, it is also the preferred type of tool for designing mailing labels and business cards.

Using Debian Squeeze

Filed under
Linux

usalug-org.blogspot: Last Friday I downloaded a daily build of Debian Squeeze and I have been using it since that time. I was not very happy with the default graphical installer;

Absolute Linux 13.0.2

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: I always admire the effort made by developers to take a version of Linux that isn’t particularly friendly to desktop users and tame it a bit thus making it available to a wider audience. Absolute Linux is one such distro.

What if buying a new car were like using nonfree software?

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org/blogs: What if buying a new car were like using nonfree software? While the following example may seem a little far-fetched, it is a pretty good analogy to understand the importance of user freedoms in software.

I'll Use Linux When $App Magically Appears

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com/blog: I'm sure you've seen this is as often as I have, even from supposed Free Software advocates: "I can't switch completely to Linux now because I still need this $foo application. When a free alternative appears then I'll switch."

Six Top Screen Capture Tools for Linux

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: Basic screenshot software is really handy to have on hand, even if you don't use it often. If you rely on screengrab tools often, however, you know how important it is to have software with lots of tools and features.

Five ways to ease migration from Windows to Linux

ghacks.net: In this brief series (if two articles can be considered a series) I will help ease the migration from both Windows to Linux and Mac to Linux. Hopefully, upon reading these articles, you will have a good game plan so your migration (or your users migration) will be as seamless as possible.

andLinux: Run Linux Applications Seamlessly In Windows

Filed under
Misc

andLinux is a complete Ubuntu Linux system running seamlessly in Windows 2000 based systems (2000, XP, 2003, Vista, 7; 32-bit versions only).

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos