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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux users laugh at Microsoft's commitment to open source Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 9:13pm
Story Fedora 20 Ends Up With Yet Another Delay Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:56pm
Story Netrunner 13.12 RC available for testing Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:40pm
Story Linux Mint 16 OEM Has Been Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:27pm
Story Linux Kernel News Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 7:04pm
Story Fact sheet: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 1:18pm
Story UK citizen sues Microsoft over Prism private data leak to NSA Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 11:51am
Story Piixl Jetpack Steam Machine Attaches to the Back Your TV Roy Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 11:42am
Story Ubuntu to include torrent search in Dash search Rianne Schestowitz 06/12/2013 - 8:04am
Story Linutop 5 is a fanless, Linux mini-desktop (without outdated specs) Rianne Schestowitz 05/12/2013 - 11:13pm

Firefox 3.1 (Shiretoko) planned features draft

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Moz/FF As Firefox 3 approaches its grand debut this next Tuesday, for Mozilla developers it means the end of a development cycle and the start of another. A very early draft of planned features reveals that as expected, this release will be mainly about landing stuff that didn’t make it on time for the Firefox 3.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 26

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ssue #26 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: People of openSUSE: Cornelius Schumacher, Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 11.0, and Tips and Tricks: Jigish Gohil: Useful openSUSE One-Click installs from command line.

UCK! Eight steps to a new distribution

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blogs.ittoolbox: When I see those three letters, UCK, it immediately comes to mind that something nasty happened. However in this instance this UCK'y thing is actually quite sweet.

sash - the Stand Alone SHell for system recovery

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Software Let me introduce you today to a package that is quite unknown as you hopefully never need it. But when you need it and have not thought about it before, it is probably already too late. I am talking about “sash” - the “Stand Alone SHell”. Yet another shell? Yes and no.

today's leftovers

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  • Screenlets

  • 2.6.26-rc6, "A Few Less Regressions"
  • Four little Security tools you should install in Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Developer Channel: Packaging 101 Video
  • Linux maintainers woo device developers
  • Make Ubuntu a simple "Gateway" Distribution, make switching to something else easy
  • Debian Installer Lenny Beta 2 released
  • Comparison of Windows and Linux
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Interview with Linux-Magazine Italia
  • Record Your Desktop With recordMyDesktop, Part 2
  • Time to Switch to Linux?
  • Open source snub in UK schools
  • Government CIOs 'do not understand open source'

Dell E and E Slim revealed, taking on Eee and Air in one fell swoop

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Hardware We got a nice helping of slides dropped on our virtual doorstep this evening, fleshing out Dell's upcoming netbook -- which they seem to be calling the "Dell E." Um, Eeenteresting name choice, but that doesn't seem set in stone, and there's plenty else going on here to ponder over.

The Neuros OSD

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ericsbinaryworld: The Neuros OSD is a device created by Neuros Technology. This is a device I am REALLY excited about buying. I first heard about it in the latest issue of Linux Format Magazine, which gave it a rating of 9/10. What’s so awesome about this device? It runs Linux! “So what?”

Prevent RSI with Workrave

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Software Workrave is a Windows and Linux only program that can help prevent dreaded repetitive strain injuries. Unfortunately techies are quite familiar with RSI. Once installed, Workrave runs silently in the background monitoring how much time you’re using the computer.


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digested.blogspot: I hate graphical file managers. Not only graphical. I hated the text mode filemanagers of yore. I feel deep comfort seeing the lonely and stark command prompt. Using Dolphin the other day to browse through my drives, I realized why.

Opera 9.5 review

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Software Opera is hoping to steal some of Firefox's thunder, with a launch timed to fall just before the open-source darling's version 3 unveiling. Although I found a few sites that didn't fully support it, and occasionally ran into a stability issue, Opera's problems are minor. Opera is a one-stop Internet shop, and it's faster, safer, and more compatible than ever.

is it a desktop?

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Aaron J. Seigo: Havoc Pennington wrote recently in his blog about reinvigorating GNOME development and reflects upon the idea of delivering yet another "desktop system" to the market. There are two problems with his statement.

Standalone OSS revenue to reach $4.83 billion by 2012

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  • Standalone OSS revenue to reach $4.83 billion by 2012

  • Open source as industrial policy
  • The Subtle Art of Open Source Migrations
  • ISO: there can be only one
  • Open source tour of Europe: Turkey
  • Yahoo's open-source search man to leave

some howtos:

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  • Google search in command line

  • Speed up your Ubuntu Linux boot
  • Fedora 9: Rsyslog - Most Advanced Log Server
  • Better font display in Firefox 3 on Ubuntu
  • How to prevent a package from being updated in Debian
  • ASCII Pronunciation Rules for Programmers
  • Headless torrent downloads with rTorrent and Screen
  • Howto Increase video performance in Ubuntu
  • Using NTSYSV To Manage Linux Services

Wall Street becoming Linux stronghold

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Linux Wall Street firms increasingly are buying into Linux, but some still need convincing that open source licensing and support models won't make using the technology more trouble than its worth.

Linux Mint 5.0 is Simple (in a good way)

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alternativenayk.wordpress: I finally found time to download and install Linux Mint 5.0 today, and happily wiped my already-feeling-outdated Ubuntu 8.04. The moral of the story is, Linux Mint 5.0 (Elyssa) is not a “rock your world” kind of distro, but it certain is easy to use as promised.

A day at the Opera

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celettu.wordpress: I hate Opera. I really do. And I hate it even more because, unlike Internet Explorer, or Konqueror, I want to like it. I want to make it work, and I just can’t. It’s maddening.

Also: Opera 9.5 Takes Aim at Browser Market Share

Finally, it's time for Wine

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Software Fifteen years in the making, everyone's favorite software to run Windows programs on Linux and Unix, Wine, is almost ready for its 1.0 release. If all goes well, Alexandre Julliard, Wine's lead developer, says that Wine 1.0 should appear on June 20, two weeks after the program's fifteenth birthday.

The Inevitability of Open Source Windows

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temporaryland.wordpress: The FOSS (Free/Open Source Software) Community knows, thanks to leaked Microsoft internal documents, that since about 1998 Microsoft has been in a sort of war against them. Because of this, it is not surprising that the FOSS community has looked at Microsoft with suspicion and has vilified it to no end. But, is Microsoft really evil?

What's 'Disruptive' About Open Source

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OSS The other day, while in a phone conversation, the old canard about open source being a "disruptive technology" came up. It's true, but I think it's one of those things (like "information wants to be free") that runs the risk of becoming a thought-cliché. You always want to talk about what's being disrupted, and why, and to what end.

Ubuntu gets the Remix right

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Ubuntu Rarely does one find the proprietor of a company that is closely connected to any kind of software getting on mailing lists to try to correct public perceptions of his product. In that respect, Mark Shuttleworth stands apart from all his peers.

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Security News

  • GNU Tar "Pointy Feather" Vulnerability Disclosed (CVE-2016-6321)
    Last week was the disclosure of the Linux kernel's Dirty COW vulnerability while the latest high-profile open-source project going public with a new security CVE is GNU's Tar. Tar CVE-2016-6321 is also called POINTYFEATHER according to the security researchers. The GNU Pointy Feather vulnerability comes down to a pathname bypass on the Tar extraction process. Regardless of the path-name(s) specified on the command-line, the attack allows for file and directory overwrite attacks using specially crafted tar archives.
  • Let’s Encrypt and The Ford Foundation Aim To Create a More Inclusive Web
    Let’s Encrypt was awarded a grant from The Ford Foundation as part of its efforts to financially support its growing operations. This is the first grant that has been awarded to the young nonprofit, a Linux Foundation project which provides free, automated and open SSL certificates to more than 13 million fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs). The grant will help Let’s Encrypt make several improvements, including increased capacity to issue and manage certificates. It also covers costs of work recently done to add support for Internationalized Domain Name certificates. “The people and organizations that Ford Foundation serves often find themselves on the short end of the stick when fighting for change using systems we take for granted, like the Internet,” Michael Brennan, Internet Freedom Program Officer at Ford Foundation, said. “Initiatives like Let’s Encrypt help ensure that all people have the opportunity to leverage the Internet as a force for change.”
  • How security flaws work: SQL injection
    Thirty-one-year-old Laurie Love is currently staring down the possibility of 99 years in prison. After being extradited to the US recently, he stands accused of attacking systems belonging to the US government. The attack was allegedly part of the #OpLastResort hack in 2013, which targeted the US Army, the US Federal Reserve, the FBI, NASA, and the Missile Defense Agency in retaliation over the tragic suicide of Aaron Swartz as the hacktivist infamously awaited trial.
  • How To Build A Strong Security Awareness Program
    At the Security Awareness Summit this August in San Francisco, a video clip was shown that highlights the need to develop holistic security awareness. The segment showed an employee being interviewed as a subject matter expert in his office cubicle. Unfortunately, all his usernames and passwords were on sticky notes behind him, facing the camera and audience for all to see. I bring this story up not to pick on this poor chap but to highlight the fact that security awareness is about human behavior, first and foremost. Understand that point and you are well on your way to building a more secure culture and organization. My work as director of the Security Awareness Training program at the SANS Institute affords me a view across hundreds of organizations and hundreds of thousands of employees trying to build a more secure workforce and society. As we near the end of this year's National Cyber Security Awareness Month, here are two tips to incorporate robust security awareness training into your organization and daily work.

What comes after ‘iptables’? It’s successor, of course: `nftables`

Nftables is a new packet classification framework that aims to replace the existing iptables, ip6tables, arptables and ebtables facilities. It aims to resolve a lot of limitations that exist in the venerable ip/ip6tables tools. The most notable capabilities that nftables offers over the old iptables are: Read more

Linux 4.8.5

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.5 kernel. All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git:// linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal git web browser: Read more Also: Linux 4.4.28

Chapeau Is Exactly What the Linux Desktop Needs

That is where Chapeau comes in. Chapeau is a cutting-edge Linux distribution, built from Fedora Workstation, using the GNOME desktop environment, and intended to be an incredibly intuitive and easy to use, out-of-the box experience. Trust me when I say Chapeau is exactly that. Part of the Chapeau marketing states that it is “Fedora without the work.” I could not have said it better. With Chapeau, you get a desktop distribution in which everything works—in every way—out of the box. Read more