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Tuesday, 12 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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openSUSE Weekly News Issue 97 is out!

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #97 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out!

GwenView ReView - The Linux killer application?

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: I do not know who Gwen is or what she looks like, but GwenView looks good and it's a great application. When it comes to working with images, GwenView offers the right balance.

A New Game Comes To Linux And It's Not A FPS

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: While quality native Linux games are rather in short supply, those that do end up coming out of the professional game studios end up being first-person shooters. If though you have been trying to find a new non-FPS game that has native Linux support, there is a new one emerging and that is QuantZ.

Linux Version of App Store?

Filed under
Linux
Software

lebokov21.com: Today I read a blog post from the technology section of Canada.com. In the post, the author mentioned about Apple’s App Store in which it is really true that “there’s an App for that”. He was saying that there are over 100,000 applications available on App Store and you can find anything you want. As a Linux user myself, I have to say that Linux users have been enjoying this for a long time.

Google: Firms can 'get rid' of Office in a year

Filed under
Google

zdnetasia.com: In a year, most enterprises will have the choice to "get rid of [Microsoft] Office if they chose to", suggests Dave Girouard, president of Google's enterprise division.

Software ahead of the curve

Filed under
Software
  • Software ahead of the curve: Gwibber 2.0
  • Kopete – The KDE Messenger for Linux
  • FreeOrion Is A Science Fiction Strategy Game

Ubuntu 9.10 Live CD and Mandriva One 2010 Compared

Filed under
MDV
Ubuntu

linuxbsdos.com: For this review, however, I’m doing a two-for-one – revewing and comparing two very popular distros. For the reader, I think it makes it very easy (or easier) to evaluate distros.

The KDE adventure continues

Filed under
KDE

ken.ath.cx: So I’m still using KDE surprisingly, and actually liking it. Finally got most of my keybinds working so I can work efficiently. I found KDE’s ability to easily pass key presses to a specific window quite nifty, allowing me to easily map all my multimedia keys to work with XMMS.

The yin and yang of Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

cubicgarden.com: So I upgrade my dell XPS laptop to Ubuntu 9.10 pretty soon after the launch of 9.10, and to be honest its been pretty good to me. However I have had a couple of problems.

Cloud is Just Another Word for "Sucker"

linuxtoday.com: As much as we warn about privacy, security, and reliability problems in cloud computing, it's coming and we can't stop it. So do we join the cloud party? Heck no.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  1. Mandriva 2010 Spring development has begun
  2. Fedora 12 One-Page Release Notes PDF
  3. Hands-On: Chumby Classic vs Chumby One
  4. Commercial Editor UltraEdit Now Also for Linux
  5. Fedora 12 Linux Tackles Virtualization
  6. MPlayer Now Supports Most HD-DVD/Blu-Ray Codecs
  7. Netbook OS news roundup: Chrome, OpenSUSE, Mandriva, Jolicloud
  8. Wally is a kick-ass, connected wallpaper changer
  9. Flicking Around with KDE 4.4
  10. Communities Vs. Teams: Open Source Needs Both
  11. Heard it through the Foresight grapevine...
  12. Eric Clapton using Drupal
  13. Windows 7 sure looks a lot like KDE 4...
  14. The OOM Killer and How to Make it Less Annoying
  15. The MySQL question - free or free-market?
  16. Perl.org refresh goes live
  17. Great Documentation Is Key to Open Source Success
  18. Learning Python, fourth edition
  19. Did the Economic Meltdown set the perfect launch time for LINUX desktops?
  20. Icculus on Aquaria
  21. My Debian Black-out – the price of bleeding edge
  22. Boxee Box hardware announced for open source Media Center
  23. Linux means liberty
  24. CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.11.13
  25. FLOSS Weekly 95: The Open Rights Group

Microsoft admits Win 7 tool violated GPL

Filed under
Microsoft
  • Microsoft admits Win 7 tool violated GPL
  • Microsoft: Win7 tool includes GPL code; software will go open source
  • Microsoft 'Sudo' Patent No Danger To Unix

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to keep Gentoo safely updated
  • Improve Picasa's Looks In Ubuntu
  • Dual Booting Mandriva 2010 with Grub2
  • Tweet from the command line with Twidge
  • [ How to ] solve laptop's ACPI related problems in Ubuntu
  • TCP Wrappers Configuration Files
  • Removing 60-second delay when Reboot or Shutdown in Ubuntu
  • How To Check Which Software Package Is Using More Space
  • Improve Flasher Player 10 Performance

How to Play Classic Console Games in Linux

Filed under
Gaming
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: If you’re reading this, there’s a good chance you grew up with classic video game consoles like the NES and Sega Genesis. For years Windows users have been enjoying high quality game emulation software, but many of the Linux options have been buggy or incomplete. It’s time to take a look at where things stand when it comes to playing console games in Linux.

Promoting FOSS with Analogies: Ford vs BK

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: Out of the many analogies I have used over the years, the Ford vs BK one is likely the best I have ever encountered. But what is the Ford vs BK analogy and how does it help me promote FOSS?

Google Chrome OS: A Nice Place to Visit, But?

Filed under
OS
Google

pcworld.com: Chrome OS strikes me as being just enough Linux to allow an underpowered computer to run Chrome browser and connect to cloud-based applications. How exciting can that really be?

Did Microsoft Patent Sudo? Apparently Not

Filed under
Microsoft

extremetech.com: The Internet was buzzing yesterday with news (apparently originated at Groklaw that had people in the know quivering with anxious anticipation: Microsoft had patented sudo, so could the end of the world be far behind? The real story, however, is far less salacious.

What about the unknown Linux distros?

Filed under
Linux

totalinux.org: Practically the entire planet has heard of Ubuntu due to it’s colossal marketing machine, free CD’s, huge online community and related user blogs. But what about all the other distros that haven’t made it to Distrowatch yet?

The best Linux collection managers compared

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Collecting things is human nature. The things we collect change over time, but the process never stops. That's where collection mangers come in.

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More in Tux Machines

Mint 18.3: The best Linux desktop takes big steps forward

I run many operating systems every day, from macOS, to Windows 7 and 10, to more Linux desktop distributions than you can shake a stick at. And, once more, as a power-user's power user, I've found the latest version of Linux Mint to be the best of the best. Why? Let's start with the basics. MacOS has been shown to have the worst bug I've ever seen in an operating system: The macOS High Sierra security hole that lets anyone get full administrative control. Windows, old and new, continues to have multiple security bugs every lousy month. Linux? Sure, it has security problems. How many of these bugs have had serious desktop impacts? Let me see now. None. Yes, that would be zero. Read more

Today in Techrights

Security: NSA, Microsoft Debacles, and FOSS Updates

  • Script Recovers Event Logs Doctored by NSA Hacking Tool
    Security researchers have found a way to reverse the effects of an NSA hacking utility that deletes event logs from compromised machines. Last week, Fox-IT published a Python script that recovers event log entries deleted using the "eventlogedit" utility that's part of DanderSpritz, a supposed NSA cyber-weapon that was leaked online by a hacking group known as the Shadow Brokers. According to Fox-IT, they found a flaw in the DanderSpritz log cleaner when they realized the utility does not actually delete event log entries, but only unreferences them, merging entries together.
  • Pre-Installed Keylogger Discovered on Hundreds of HP Laptop Models
    A keylogger that can help record pretty much every keystroke on the computer has been discovered on HP’s devices, with a security researcher revealing that hundreds of laptop models come with this hidden software pre-installed. Michael Myng says in an analysis of the keylogger that the malicious code is hiding in the Synaptics Touchpad software and he actually discovered it when looking into ways to control the keyboard backlight on his laptop. According to his findings, the keylogger isn’t activated by default, but it can be turned on by any cybercriminals that get access to the system. The list of affected models includes hundreds of laptops like EliteBook, ProBook, Spectre, Zbook, Envy, and Pavilion.
  • Laptop touchpad driver included extra feature: a keylogger [Ed: This is the second time in recent times HP gets caught with keyloggers; This is no accident, it's intentional.]
    Flaws in software often offer a potential path for attackers to install malicious software, but you wouldn't necessarily expect a hardware vendor to include potentially malicious software built right into its device drivers. But that's exactly what a security researcher found while poking around the internals of a driver for a touchpad commonly used on HP notebook computers—a keystroke logger that could be turned on with a simple change to its configuration in the Windows registry.
  • Microsoft Needed 110 Days to Fix Critical Security Bug After First Ignoring It
    Microsoft needed more than 100 days to fix a critical credential leak in Dynamics 365 after the company originally ignored the bug report and only reacted after being warned that details could go public. Software engineer Matthias Gliwka explains in a long blog post that he discovered and reported a security flaw in Microsoft’s Customer Relationship Manager and Enterprise Resource Planning software in August, but the software giant refused to fix it on claims that administrator credentials would be required. Gliwka says he came across a wildcard transport layer security (TLS) certificate that also included the private key, which would in turn expose communications by anyone who could decrypt traffic. The developer says that extracting the certificate grants access to any sandbox environment, with absolutely no warning or message displayed to clients.
  • UK Spy Agency Finds Severe Flaw in Microsoft Antivirus in Kaspersky Bye-Bye Push
  • Security updates for Monday

OSS Leftovers

  • What is a blockchain smart contract?
    Now, in a blockchain, the important thing is that once the state has changed, you then ensure it's recorded on the blockchain so that it's public and nobody can change or challenge it. But there are other uses for blockchain technology, as I explained in "Is blockchain a security topic?" Permissionless systems, often referred to as distributed ledger technologies (DLTs) are a great fit for non-transactional state models, largely because the sort of people who are interested in them are closed groups of organisations that want to have complex sets of conditions met before they move to the next state. These aren't, by the tightest definition, blockchains. Banks and other financial institutions may be the most obvious examples where DLTs are gaining traction, but they are very useful in supply chain sectors, for instance, where you may have conditions around changing market rates, availability, and shipping times or costs, which may all play into the final price of the commodity or service being provided.
  • Running a successful open source project
    Running an open source project is easy. All you have to do is make your source code available and you’re open source, right? Well, maybe. Ultimately, whether or not an open source project is successful depends on your definition of success. Regardless of your definition, creating an open source project can be a lot of work. If you have goals regarding adoption, for example, then you need to be prepared to invest. While open source software is “free as in beer”, it’s not really free: time and energy are valuable resources and these valuable resources need to be invested in the project. So, how do you invest those resources?
  • New package repositories are now enabled by default
    During this year’s coding sprint in Toulouse (which I was able to attend, thanks to being in Europe on a study-abroad program), I spent a lot of time massaging HaikuPorts to generate a consistent-enough state of packages for us to switch to them by default, and then making the in-tree changes necessary for the switch. Thanks to this and mmlr’s comprehensive overhaul of the HaikuPorter Buildmaster over the past couple months, we have finally switched to the new repositories by default as of hrev51620. If you’ve installed a nightly image from after this, you should be able to just pkgman full-sync and upgrade away.
  • Haiku OS Is Very Close To Their Long Awaited Beta, New Repository Working
    The BeOS-inspired Haiku operating system should be issuing its long-awaited beta release by early 2018. For months there has been talk of the long-awaited beta for Haiku OS while it looks like roughly within the next month we should be actually seeing this milestone.
  • DeepVariant: Tool to call out variants in sequencing data goes open source
    Megan Molteni, Wired, decoded, at least, the very nature of the challenge to know more about our human puzzle. "Today, a teaspoon of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA. But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over." DeepVariant was developed by researchers from the Google Brain team, focused on AI techniques, and Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences. It is based on the same neural network for image recognition, but DeepVariant, is now making headlines not for cat IDs but as a way to scan a genetic code for mutations. DeepVariant has gone open source. The GitHub definition of DeepVariant: "an analysis pipeline that uses a deep neural network to call genetic variants from next-generation DNA sequencing data."
  • Open source VPN clients vs VPN provider apps: which is better?
    Power users love open source software for its transparency and flexibility – but what about open source VPN software? Are there any open source VPN clients that can stand up to being compared with the more popular VPN apps from premium providers like ExpressVPN, VyprVPN, IPVanish or NordVPN? The short answer is... not really. But the long answer depends a lot on your level of technical know-how, patience, and where you’re willing to place your trust.
  • Coreboot Conference 2017 Videos Now Available
    For those interested in the open-source Coreboot project that serves as a replacement to proprietary UEFI/BIOS, the videos from their European Coreboot Conference are now available. The European Coreboot Conference 2017 (ECC'17) was held in Bochum, Germany back at the end of October.
  • Election night hackathon supports civic engagement
    On November 7, 2017, members of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) community came together for the annual Election Night Hackathon held in the Simone Center for Student Innovation. This marked the seventh anniversary of a civic tradition for the FOSS @ MAGIC community, in which students and faculty analyze civic problems in the local community, state, or country and propose a project to address them. MAGIC Center faculty and event organizers are on hand to help students choose open source licenses and publish and share their code.
  • What is a blockchain smart contract?
    Now, in a blockchain, the important thing is that once the state has changed, you then ensure it's recorded on the blockchain so that it's public and nobody can change or challenge it. But there are other uses for blockchain technology, as I explained in "Is blockchain a security topic?" Permissionless systems, often referred to as distributed ledger technologies (DLTs) are a great fit for non-transactional state models, largely because the sort of people who are interested in them are closed groups of organisations that want to have complex sets of conditions met before they move to the next state. These aren't, by the tightest definition, blockchains. Banks and other financial institutions may be the most obvious examples where DLTs are gaining traction, but they are very useful in supply chain sectors, for instance, where you may have conditions around changing market rates, availability, and shipping times or costs, which may all play into the final price of the commodity or service being provided.
  • Running a successful open source project
    Running an open source project is easy. All you have to do is make your source code available and you’re open source, right? Well, maybe. Ultimately, whether or not an open source project is successful depends on your definition of success. Regardless of your definition, creating an open source project can be a lot of work. If you have goals regarding adoption, for example, then you need to be prepared to invest. While open source software is “free as in beer”, it’s not really free: time and energy are valuable resources and these valuable resources need to be invested in the project. So, how do you invest those resources?
  • New package repositories are now enabled by default
    During this year’s coding sprint in Toulouse (which I was able to attend, thanks to being in Europe on a study-abroad program), I spent a lot of time massaging HaikuPorts to generate a consistent-enough state of packages for us to switch to them by default, and then making the in-tree changes necessary for the switch. Thanks to this and mmlr’s comprehensive overhaul of the HaikuPorter Buildmaster over the past couple months, we have finally switched to the new repositories by default as of hrev51620. If you’ve installed a nightly image from after this, you should be able to just pkgman full-sync and upgrade away.
  • Haiku OS Is Very Close To Their Long Awaited Beta, New Repository Working
    The BeOS-inspired Haiku operating system should be issuing its long-awaited beta release by early 2018. For months there has been talk of the long-awaited beta for Haiku OS while it looks like roughly within the next month we should be actually seeing this milestone.
  • DeepVariant: Tool to call out variants in sequencing data goes open source
    Megan Molteni, Wired, decoded, at least, the very nature of the challenge to know more about our human puzzle. "Today, a teaspoon of spit and a hundred bucks is all you need to get a snapshot of your DNA. But getting the full picture—all 3 billion base pairs of your genome—requires a much more laborious process. One that, even with the aid of sophisticated statistics, scientists still struggle over." DeepVariant was developed by researchers from the Google Brain team, focused on AI techniques, and Verily, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on life sciences. It is based on the same neural network for image recognition, but DeepVariant, is now making headlines not for cat IDs but as a way to scan a genetic code for mutations. DeepVariant has gone open source. The GitHub definition of DeepVariant: "an analysis pipeline that uses a deep neural network to call genetic variants from next-generation DNA sequencing data."
  • Open source VPN clients vs VPN provider apps: which is better?
    Power users love open source software for its transparency and flexibility – but what about open source VPN software? Are there any open source VPN clients that can stand up to being compared with the more popular VPN apps from premium providers like ExpressVPN, VyprVPN, IPVanish or NordVPN? The short answer is... not really. But the long answer depends a lot on your level of technical know-how, patience, and where you’re willing to place your trust.