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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The New in KDE 4.5 with pictures

Filed under
KDE
  • The New in KDE 4.5 with pictures
  • Elementary Modification of the KDESC 4.4 Default Login (KDM & KSplash)

Book Review: Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming

Filed under
Linux

linuxsecurity.com: Mark Sobell has again compiled a great collection of applications and utilities in A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, and his experience shows in this second edition.

openSUSE 11.3 Milestone 6 released

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Milestone 6 (of 7), a snapshot of the Factory “work in progress” build, leading up to openSUSE 11.3 release in July, is now available for download.

8 Great Linux Routers, from SOHO to Enterprise

Filed under
Hardware
Software

linuxplanet.com: The Linux and the open source community doesn't just create great desktop and server solutions. They also create worthy router solutions, many which are open, free, and/or Linux-based.

Phenom II X6 Performance Under Linux Below Expectations

Filed under
Hardware

ubuntu-user.com: In testing the Phenom II X6, Linux Magazine noticed that AMDs new processor doesn't have the full performance under the current Linux kernel.

A Look at minit

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Sys-V init has long been the standard solution for booting. However, being open minded, let's look at an alternative approach.

BitDefender for UNIX-based operating systems

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Anti-virus software has become a critical aspect of computing at all levels. Although to this point it seems the only operating system that is really targeted by viruses is Microsoft Windows, the time will come when UNIX-based operating systems will be equally as marked.

Peppermint OS: a review

Filed under
Linux

linuxcritic.wordpress: What do you get when you combine the flexibility, versatility and ease of maintenance of Ubuntu, the blinding speed and simplicity of LXDE, and a focus on social media and the cloud?

KDE 4.4.3 reached Debian Sid, and its awesome

Filed under
KDE

gnuski.blogspot: Today, the 3rd of May 2010, KDE SC 4.4.3 has been uploaded to Debian Sid (Unstable). This is the first of the 4.4.x series that Debian has had (outside of the Experimental repository and an unofficial repository), and so far the whole of it is awesome.

Is Windows 7 Actually Faster Than Ubuntu 10.04?

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: While Linux has long been talked about as being a faster operating system than Microsoft Windows, in 2010 is this still the case?

Systemd presented as SysV-Init and Upstart alternative

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: In his "Rethinking PID 1" blog post, open source developer Lennart Poettering, who is known for his work on Avahia and Pulseaudio, has announced "Systemd", an alternative to SysV-Init and the Init system Upstart.

We have an early Linux tablet video

Filed under
Hardware

theinquirer.net: FUSION GARAGE has announced the availability of its Joojoo tablet in the UK, and The INQUIRER went along to the launch for a walk-through of the Linux handheld device and obtained an exclusive demonstation video.

shuttleworth: Window indicators

Filed under
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: Why limit indicators to the panel? Let’s make it possible for applications to use indicators themselves, for all the things that indicators are good at:

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 352

Filed under
Linux

This Week in Distrowatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Ubuntu 10.04
  • News: Ubuntu 10.04 features list, Linux Mint for PowerPC, Fedora Kiosk spin, overview of SUSE Studio
  • Questions and answers: The future of OpenSolaris
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 10.04, Ultimate Edition 2.6, EasyPeasy 1.6
  • Upcoming releases: DEFT Linux 5.1
  • Donations: Bacula receives US$250.00
  • Reader comments

This and more in this week's Distrowatch Weekly...

Installing fresh operating systems, then updating them

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

toolbox.com/blogs: What it really boils down to is that installing either Linux or windows is pretty simple and takes similar amounts of time. However, the install does not finish once the installation CD is ejected from the computer. The operating system then needs to be updated.

Have Debian Forks Hurt Debian?

Filed under
Linux

robinzrants.wordpress: It has been argued both ways for years. Both sides have valid points, and experience varies so widely depending on so many factors that it seems impossible to come to a conclusion.

6 Things I like about Ubuntu 10.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 6 Things I like about Ubuntu 10.04 LTS
  • It’s the fat that makes you look fat
  • Unscrewing Your Failed Ubuntu 10.04 Upgrade

today's leftovers & howtos:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Who is KDE part XXX
  • A shout-out to nouveau
  • Debian on a Lenovo IdeaPad S10
  • Easter eggs in Firefox
  • It’s time for Hulu to adopt HTML5 instead of Flash
  • Apache Cassandra gets boost from Riptano (Q&A)
  • Nouveau, Gallium3D, and Compiz on Debian
  • apt-rdepends: How to know the dependencies of a package in Ubuntu
  • Using Linux again - on an Acer Aspire 250D
  • apt-get how to fix very broken packages
  • How to Split mp3 audio files - Mp3splt
  • Linux Action Show! s11e10 | Ubuntu 10.04 Review

Ogg versus the world: don't fall for open-source FUD

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com/Bott: While researching the recent battle over H.264 as the default HTML5 media format, I’ve discovered that open-source advocates are just as capable of spreading FUD as those mega-corporations. And the single worst offender is the Free Software Foundation.

Four tools I don’t use

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I have no idea if these things work. None whatsoever. They might do what they claim and then again, they might spiral wildly out of control and create more problems than they’re worth.

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Cloud Foundry (LF) News

‘No Company Is So Important Its Existence Justifies Setting Up a Police State’

You’re talking about very — about specific manifestations, and in some cases in ways that presuppose a weak solution. What is data privacy? The term implies that if a company collects data about you, it should somehow protect that data. But I don’t think that’s the issue. I think the problem is that it collects data about you period. We shouldn’t let them do that. I won’t let them collect data about me. I refuse to use the ones that would know who I am. There are unfortunately some areas where I can’t avoid that. I can’t avoid even for a domestic flight giving the information of who I am. That’s wrong. You shouldn’t have to identify yourself if you’re not crossing a border and having your passport checked. With prescriptions, pharmacies sell the information about who gets what sort of prescription. There are companies that find this out about people. But they don’t get much of a chance to show me ads because I don’t use any sites in a way that lets them know who I am and show ads accordingly. So I think the problem is fundamental. Companies are collecting data about people. We shouldn’t let them do that. The data that is collected will be abused. That’s not an absolute certainty, but it’s a practical, extreme likelihood, which is enough to make collection a problem. A database about people can be misused in four ways. First, the organization that collects the data can misuse the data. Second, rogue employees can misuse the data. Third, unrelated parties can steal the data and misuse it. That happens frequently, too. And fourth, the state can collect the data and do really horrible things with it, like put people in prison camps. Which is what happened famously in World War II in the United States. And the data can also enable, as it did in World War II, Nazis to find Jews to kill. In China, for example, any data can be misused horribly. But in the U.S. also, you’re looking at a CIA torturer being nominated to head the CIA, and we can’t assume that she will be rejected. So when you put this together with the state spying that Snowden told us about, and with the Patriot Act that allows the FBI to take almost any database of personal data without even talking to a court. And what you see is, for companies to have data about you is dangerous. And I’m not interested in discussing the privacy policies that these companies have. First of all, privacy policies are written so that they appear to promise you some sort of respect for privacy, while in fact having such loopholes that the company can do anything at all. But second, the privacy policy of the company doesn’t do anything to stop the FBI from taking all that data every week. Anytime anybody starts collecting some data, if the FBI thinks it’s interesting, it will grab that data. And we also know that the FBI and other such agencies are inclined to label protesters as terrorists. So that way they can use laws that were ostensibly adopted to protect us from terrorists to threaten a much larger number of us than any terrorist could. Read more Also: Numerical Analysis Software Global Market Analysis & Forecast: Analytica, Matlab, GNU Octave, Plotly, FlexPro

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Android Leftovers