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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Xfce 4.12 Planned For Release In A Few Weeks Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 9:24am
Story Progress on the prototype for a possible next version of akonadi Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 9:04am
Story PC-BSD 10.1.1 Cinnamon review Rianne Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 8:45am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 1:08am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 1:07am
Story Risk of the Commons Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2015 - 12:35am
Story RMS Feels There's "A Systematic Effort To Attack GNU Packages" Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 11:25pm
Story Elive 2.5.4 beta released Roy Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 11:15pm
Story Watch GTK+ Apps Running in Unity 8, on Ubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:28pm
Story Wine (Wine is not an emulator) 1.7.36 Gives Users Control over Speakers Rianne Schestowitz 07/02/2015 - 9:20pm

What Microsoft Doesn't Get

Filed under
Microsoft
  • What Microsoft Doesn't Get - And What I Hope You Do
  • Patent Trolls in the 21st Century
  • Software patent game plays out
  • FOSS Fans Wary of Microsoft's New CodePlex Foundation
  • Will Microsoft's Open Source Initiative Kill Linux?
  • Linux developer tells Microsoft to get back to work
  • Microsoft $358m patent violation damages tossed

A Very Early Look At OpenSolaris 2010.02

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: OpenSolaris 2009.06 was released earlier this year, but unlike in years past and contrary to their original six month release cycle, there will not be another OpenSolaris distribution release in 2009. Instead, the next slated release is OpenSolaris 2010.02. We have screenshots.

How to Install Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: Don't read further if you are already yawning upon reading the title, which is How to Install Ubuntu. However, there's a graph that I'm going to show to you that I hope you will find interesting:

Go-oo - OpenOffice with a twist

Filed under
Software

dedoimedo.com: All your friends and business partners run Microsoft Office and you cannot afford to have any blunders when reading their documents. Likewise, you don't want to have your presentations all garbled up when you import them from Impress to PowerPoint. What about Office 2007? What about macros in your Excel sheets?

CAD Programs for Linux

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: Often, when I ask why users don’t adopt Linux, I am met with the response “There are no CAD (Computer Aided Design) applications. Now I will confess that I know next to nothing about CAD, so I thought I would take a moment to highlight some of the CAD applications available for the Linux operating system.

Netbook OSes: Which will rule the enterprise?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

computerworld.com: Netbooks are selling at a nice clip -- IDC predicts more than 20 million units sold by year's end. Next up: the enterprise. Windows may have the early lead, but don't rule out Linux just yet.

The New Artwork in Ubuntu 9.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: Today we decided to post for our readers, especially Ubuntu users, some of the community themes and icons that will be present in the upcoming Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) operating system.

Thunderbird Quick Folders

Filed under
Moz/FF

ghacks.net: There are basically two types of desktop email software users. Type one uses one huge folder for all emails while type 2 neatly sorts emails into subfolders for better manageability.

An open source flower wilts and dies

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: I knew of a little flower called Open Source. It started out as a seed and was given water, fertiliser and sunlight. This flower started growing and sending out roots, becoming stronger with every leaf. One day the fertiliser was changed.

Choosing the Right Linux Netbook + Why You Should Avoid Windows 7

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Instead of bashing Microsoft for deliberately spreading several great lies about Linux, I'm going to write something useful that I hope will benefit those who are planning to buy a netbook.

openSUSE Goes Offline To Transform

Filed under
SUSE

linuxjournal.com: Having your Linux distribution suddenly disappear from the internet would put a strain on anyone. It does happen from time to time, however, something the team at Fedora can testify to. Announcing in advance that your distro will pull a David Copperfield would prove far less stressful, and that's exactly what the good people at openSUSE have done.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Group test: newsreaders
  • Kubuntu apps repraise
  • Four GNOME Blogging Clients Worth Noting
  • Are you a 100% free user?
  • Netbooks? Oh Yes, They Are Enterprise Grade
  • Software Freedom Day Italy (Perugia)
  • Will KVM KO Xen?
  • Video: Audio Production With Free Software
  • Microsoft makes points to ponder
  • Case Study: Financial firm switches from Unix, Windows to Linux
  • NYSE/Euronext powers ahead with Unix-to-Linux migration
  • DreamWorks uses Red Hat cloud to cut filmmaking costs
  • The Status Of Unigine's Linux-Compatible Game
  • AMD Eyefinity 24 Display Tech Demo On Linux
  • MySQL Connector for OpenOffice.org 1.0 GA
  • Linux on POWER: Distribution migration and binary compatibility considerations
  • White House Director of New Media speaks about Open Source
  • Novell: Novell Open Source Luminaries to Speak at LinuxCon
  • Not always Gentoo's fault
  • OpenMW interview with Nicolay Korslund
  • GoblinX 3.0 GNOME Edition Has Support for Netbooks
  • Fun and FUD in the Fall Flamebait Follies

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Count packages installed by pacman
  • Adding a user on Zenwalk 6.2
  • Working with Bluetooth: Connecting to All Those Cool Devices
  • Changing the from field when sending email
  • OOo: How to tell what data your chart is based on, and update it
  • Add a second drive to your Ubuntu server
  • How to install Java Runtime on Zenwalk 6.2
  • How can I assign a user process to a specific pseudo tty?
  • How to update your custom Ubuntu Jaunty kernel
  • Protect Your Network With an Open-Source Firewall

Linux distribution

Get Decked: A Look at TweetDeck

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: Having trouble keeping up with your social media? The TweetDeck crew released a major update to the “social dashboard” this week that adds support for Facebook and MySpace. Now you can update several major services and bring order to your social media universe.

LifeHacker and Ubuntu: A Response

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonobacon.org: Recently LifeHacker had an article talking about five things they would like to see in Ubuntu. The article is very supportive of Ubuntu, and we appreciate that LifeHacker folks, and I wanted to follow up with a few notes.

Nano notebook design sports Mobile WiMAX

Filed under
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: Via announced a Linux-compatible notebook reference design that packs a 1.3GHz Nano processor along with optional Mobile WiMAX, GPS, and cellular connectivity.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Devices: Beelink S1 Mini PC, Aaeon’s SBC, Kobo and LEDE

  • Beelink S1 Mini PC and Linux – Comedy Gold
    The Beelink S1 is a small, silent mini PC released in August 2017 retailing for around 300 dollars (250 euros). It’s produced by Shenzhen AZW Technology Co Ltd, a Chinese company that focuses on Android smart TV boxes, Intel mini PCs, and home cloud TV boxes. The S1 ships with an activated copy of Windows 10. But what makes this mini PC interesting? For starters, it purports to run Ubuntu. Combined with a quad core Celeron CPU, dual monitor support (HDMI and VGA), 4K video, expansion options, together with a raft of other features, the machine looks a mouthwatering prospect compared to many other mini PCs.
  • Kaby Lake Pico-ITX SBC features dual M.2 slots
    Aaeon’s “PICO-KBU1” SBC is built on Intel 7th Gen U-series CPUs with up to 16GB DDR4, dual GbE ports, and M.2 B-key and E-Key expansion. The PICO-KBU1 SBC is equipped with Intel’s dual-core, 15W TDP 7th Gen U-series CPUs from the latest Kaby Lake generation. Other 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX boards that run Kaby Lake U-Series processors include Axiomtek’s PICO512. As usual with Aaeon, no OS support is listed.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.9995 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    It has been ages that I haven’t updated the MegaUpdate package for Kobo. Now that a new and seemingly rather bug-free and quick firmware release (4.6.9995) has been released, I finally took the time to update the whole package to the latest releases of all the included items. The update includes all my favorite patches and features: Kobo Start Menu, koreader, coolreader, pbchess, ssh access, custom dictionaries, and some side-loaded fonts.
  • LEDE v17.01.4 service release
    Version 17.01.4 of the LEDE router distribution is available with a number of important fixes. "While this release includes fixes for the bugs in the WPA Protocol disclosed earlier this week, these fixes do not fix the problem on the client-side. You still need to update all your client devices. As some client devices might never receive an update, an optional AP-side workaround was introduced in hostapd to complicate these attacks, slowing them down."

Samsung Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • FOSDEM 2018 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation
  • Top Bank, Legal and Software Industry Executives to Keynote at the Open Source Strategy Forum
  • Copyleft is Dead. Long live Copyleft!
    As you may have noticed, we recently re-licensed mgmt from the AGPL (Affero General Public License) to the regular GPL. This is a post explaining the decision and which hopefully includes some insights at the intersection of technology and legal issues.
  • Crowdsourcing the way to a more flexible strategic plan
    Trust the community. Opening a feedback platform to anyone on campus seems risky, but in hindsight I'd do it again in a heartbeat. The responses we received were very constructive; in fact, I rarely received negative and unproductive remarks. When people learned about our honest efforts at improving the community, they responded with kindness and support. By giving the community a voice—by really democratizing the effort—we achieved a surprising amount of campus-wide buy-in in a short period of time. Transparency is best. By keeping as many of our efforts as public as possible, we demonstrated that we were truly listening to our customers and understanding the effects of the outdated technology policies and decisions that were keeping them from doing their best work. I've always been a proponent of the idea that everyone is an agent of innovation; we just needed a tool that allowed everyone to make suggestions. Iterate, iterate, iterate. Crowdsourcing our first-year IT initiatives helped us create the most flexible and customer-centric plan we possibly could. The pressure to move quickly and lay down a comprehensive strategic plan is very real; however, by delaying that work and focusing on the evolving set of data flowing from our community, we were actually able to better demonstrate our commitment to our customers. That helped us build critical reputational capital, which paid off when we did eventually present a long-term strategic plan—because people already knew we could achieve results. It also helped us recruit strong allies and learn who we could trust to advance more complicated initiatives.
  • Reform is a DIY, modular, portable computer (work in progress)
    Want a fully functional laptop that works out of the box? There are plenty to choose from. Want a model that you can upgrade? That’s a bit tougher to find: some modern laptops don’t even let you replace the RAM. Then there’s the Reform. It’s a new DIY, modular laptop that’s designed to be easy to upgrade and modify. The CAD designs will even be available if you want to 3D print your own parts rather than buying a kit. You can’t buy a Reform computer yet. But developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes have developed a prototype and are soliciting feedback on the concept.
  • New neural network teaches itself Go, spanks the pros
    While artificial intelligence software has made huge strides recently, in many cases, it has only been automating things that humans already do well. If you want an AI to identify the Higgs boson in a spray of particles, for example, you have to train it on collisions that humans have already identified as containing a Higgs. If you want it to identify pictures of cats, you have to train it on a database of photos in which the cats have already been identified.