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Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ARM CoreSight Work Resurrected For The Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 31/05/2014 - 5:10am
Story Deep in-to Linux, Torvalds Tweets, and Top Distros Roy Schestowitz 31/05/2014 - 5:06am
Story The five most popular end-user Linux distributions Roy Schestowitz 31/05/2014 - 4:57am
Story June 2014 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2014 - 7:19pm
Story Unity Control Center for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Review Rianne Schestowitz 30/05/2014 - 7:01pm
Story Linus Torvalds reads mean tweets Rianne Schestowitz 30/05/2014 - 6:54pm
Story Linux Video of the Week: 40-Node Raspberry Pi Supercomputer Roy Schestowitz 30/05/2014 - 5:51pm
Story TrueCrypt Not Dead, Forked and Relocated to Switzerland Rianne Schestowitz 30/05/2014 - 5:48pm
Story GNOME Shell 3.13.2 Brings Improvements for Airplane Mode Rianne Schestowitz 30/05/2014 - 5:33pm
Story Kano review – doing it for the kids Rianne Schestowitz 30/05/2014 - 5:24pm

KDE4 apps: Dolphin

Filed under
KDE

polishlinux.org: Dolphin is the default file manager for KDE4. It is very powerful, offering many functionalities. The developers have focused on the functionality of Dolphin - being a file manager. As a long-time user, I can say it is a very proud substitute for its older brother, Konqueror.

Linux boot sequence visualized

Filed under
Linux

blog.makezine.com: This is a visualization of a linux boot sequence where each function is a node and each edge represents a function call, direct branch, or indirect branch. Nodes are laid out using an unweighted force-directed layout algorithm, where each node is simulated as if it were electrically repulsive and had springs between nodes.

Fragmentation And Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: Windows users are familiar with fragmentation. When you have fragmentation, it means that it is time to do some drive maintenance. With Linux it takes on another meaning, since Linux drives are not as prone to fragmentation. To get fragmentation in Linux all you need to do is put two users in the same room.

Google's Chrome now works on Linux, crudely

Filed under
Software

cnet.com: Google is tight-lipped about the Linux version of its Chrome browser, but the company's programmers have proved a bit more forthcoming with a brief announcement that they have a crude version of Chrome working on Linux.

Google Gadgets for Linux: Eye-Candy or Useful?

Filed under
Software

tuxgeek.me: Released in June, Google Gadgets for Linux provides about the same functionality of Vista sidebar or Mac OS X dashboard. While other solutions like ‘gdesklets’ are pretty popular within the linux crowd, Google’s’ platform provides compatibility with both gadgets written for the Windows version and the huge repository of web-centered gadgets. Let’s take it for a spin and see if it’s worth installing.

Web camera support in Your Favorite Linux

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: If you're using Internet, there's a fair chance you're using some sort of instant messaging, voice, video - or both - telephony or other communication tools to stay in touch with people all over the world. Web cameras play a big part in Internet communication. The crucial question is, can you use these devices on your laptops, should they have Linux installed on them?

Kubuntu 8.10 + KDE 4 = Failed

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: After installing the latest KDE flavor of Ubuntu last night, I am supposed to write my initial impressions about it today, and I expected it to be good. Unfortunately, something unexpected happened. Kubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex" failed miserably after the installation.

Splashtop moves into netbooks

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The Splashtop instant-on Linux environment is included in the new Lenovo IdeaPad S10e netbook, marking the product's first appearance in that form factor. That news should come as no surprise, since netbooks' ultra-portability is a natural match for Splashtop's instant-on.

Demand for Linux PCs varies across Asia

Filed under
Linux

zdnetasia.com: Linux-based PCs have reportedly been getting a bad rap for consumer resistance, but manufacturers say demand for them varies between the different Asian markets.

Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10 64 bit Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

penguinway.net: I waited a few days to let the load on the servers cool down so I could try Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10 out on my new Dell Inspiron 530 system. For those who don’t know, a 32 bit OS can’t address over 4 gigs of memory. So 64 bit is quickly becoming a necessity with the systems coming out today.

Sapphire Radeon HD 4830 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: The launch of the RV770 GPU earlier this year by AMD was quite successful. The Radeon HD 4850 and Radeon HD 4870 series feature best-in-class performance. If you are looking for leading performance and all of the bells and whistles on the newest ATI graphics cards but at a lower cost, AMD recently introduced the Radeon HD 4830.

13 Great Linux Videos!

Linux does not need multi-million advertising on top TV networks!
Every one of us can spread the word, with such high quality videos.

Installing And Using OpenVZ On Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare an Ubuntu 8.10 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project.

Linux Setup iSCSI Target ( SAN )

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linux target framework (tgt) aims to simplify various SCSI target driver (iSCSI, Fibre Channel, SRP, etc) creation and maintenance. The key goals are the clean integration into the scsi-mid layer and implementing a great portion of tgt in user space.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux Printing: A Curious Mix of Yuck and Excellence, part 1

  • What’s unique about openSUSE?
  • 50 Essential Open Source Security Tools
  • USB MiniMe 2008 install from Windows
  • Linux powered Yoggie goes open source
  • Does cb2bib remove drudgery from bibliography creation?
  • Level of Effort and Empowerment
  • 10 ways to amuse a geek
  • G1G1 coming to Europe Nov. 17
  • The license wars are over
  • Windows: The pit stop on the road to open source
  • Next generation C++ "goes beta"
  • IPFire, the Lean Linux firewall
  • Exploring VIM configurations

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing and Setting Up Avant Window Navigator

  • Ubuntu, the absolute beginners guide
  • Installing a vanilla Firefox in Kubuntu Intrepid
  • Developing with libyui/libzypp & python - part4
  • Relaying Postfix SMTP via smtp.gmail.com
  • Ubuntu Ignored Ickthyopterix 8.10 Static IP Bug
  • A Secure Nagios Server
  • Convert Flac To Ogg Vorbis In Three (Easy) Steps
  • Ubuntu 10 things in a terminal
  • Ways To Grab Screenshots In Ubuntu

Specialty Linuxes to the rescue

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com.au: Six sweet distributions that can boot from a pen drive, run in a sliver of RAM, rejuvenate an old system, or recover data from a dead PC.

File Roller is a piece of sh*t

Filed under
Software

linuxd.wordpress: I never liked File Roller, and now I’ve got proof it sucks. Besides terrible usability, it handles partitioned rar files very badly. By partitioned I mean when a rar file is separated into .r00 .r01 etc parts, by very badly I mean it can’t handle it at all.

Open-source companies crashing en masse? Puh-lease!

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet: Remember Trip Chowdhry, the analyst with Global Equities Research? He's the guy who said that Red Hat is rubbish, and that the entire LAMP stack is potty, too. Given how far off Chowdhry was then, it's perhaps no surprise that he's now claiming that "'almost every VC funded open-source company is struggling and will run out of funds within the next six months."

LZMA compression becoming the better choice

Filed under
Software

opsamericas.com: If you have not heard about it, certainly start reading up on it and DO use it. If your using bzip2 currently then your going to like this even more.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more

Tired of Windows and MAC computer systems? Linux may now be ready for prime time

Are you a bit tired of the same old options of salt and pepper, meaning having to choose only between the venerable Windows and MAC computer operating systems? Looking to branch out a bit, maybe take a walk on the wild side, learn some new things and save money? If so, the Linux operating system, which has been around for a long time and is used and loved by many hard-core techies and developers, may now be ready for prime time with the masses. Read more

Braswell based Pico-ITX SBC offers multiple expansion options

Axiomtek’s PICO300 is a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel Braswell, SATA-600, extended temperature support, and both a mini-PCIe and homegrown expansion connector. Axiomtek has launched a variation on its recently announced Intel Apollo Lake based PICO312 SBC that switches to the older Intel Braswell generation and offers a slightly reduced feature set. The board layout has also changed somewhat, with LVDS, SATA, and USB ports all changing location. Read more