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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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A cat-proof Linux-friendly netbook…?

Filed under
Hardware

openattitude.com: This here is the Samsung NB30, a semi-ruggedized netbook with one of those new Pine Trail Atom processors. I bought one over the weekend as a cat-proof alternative to my aging Eee PC. I like it so far, but there’s one big problem —

Linux is coming to an Auto Dealership near you

Filed under
Linux

linusearch.com: MontaVista Linux and Robert Bosch Car Multimedia have signed an agreement that will enable Bosch Multimedia to use MontaVista software as their Linux based solution to the high cost of running proprietary software on their infotainment systems.

Browser Speed Tests: Safari 5, Firefox 3.6, Chrome 6, and Opera 10.6 Beta

Filed under
Software

lifehacker.com: Apple's stepped up with Safari 5, Firefox has brought forth a more crash-proof 3.6, and Opera's continuing to push forward in betas. Let's break out the timer and testing software to see how the latest browsers run on real hardware.

OpenShot Linux video editor to add 3D animated titles

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The OpenShot developers have announced that they are developing a new feature that would give users the ability to create 3D animated titles in the next version of their open source video editor for Linux.

Introducing Fedora Project Leader

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat’s Partner Progress: A Reality Check
  • Introducing Fedora Project Leader Jared Smith

FFmpeg gets its own implementation of Google's VP8 codec

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Developers Ronald Bultje, David Conrad, and Jason Garret-Glaser are creating a native VP8 video codec implementation for the open source FFmpeg project. The aim of this effort is to bring first-class VP8 support to FFmpeg and demonstrate the feasibility of producing an independent VP8 implementation.

8 More Linux Distributions for Web Server

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: 8 More Linux Distributions for Web Server: I've already shared with you a list of some of the best and most well-known Linux distributions used on web servers. However, there are still plenty of excellent server-oriented Linux distros that I failed to mention there.

EFF delivers HTTPS Not Quite Everywhere

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: The name “HTTPS Everywhere” is a bit misleading. Besides Google Search, Wikipedia, Twitter and Identi.ca, and Facebook this extension also works on the EFF and Tor sites, Ixquick, DuckDuckGo, Scroogle, other small search engines, the New York Times, The Washington Post, Paypal, and many other sites that offer HTTPS encryption. But that's hardly everywhere.

Knowledge: A Different Approach to a Database on the Desktop

Filed under
KDE

kdenews.org: Desktop applications for 'Information Management' that go beyond conventional card-index style databases are hard to find. The ideas behind such software are perhaps not that well known, so a prototype program, Knowledge, has been developed to put them firmly into the public domain.

Mistakes A Noob Makes In Vim

Filed under
Software
  • Mistakes A Noob Makes In Vim
  • Grep command in Linux explained
  • Top 4 File Difference Tools

Programming with Scratch

Filed under
Software
  • Programming with Scratch
  • full-featured Komodo IDE to boost productivity
  • Modern Perl: The Book: The Draft

Trinity KDE: KDE 3 Zombified or Resurrected?

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: Several weeks ago, I ended a comparison of the KDE 4 and 3 desktops by saying "Unless a project takes over KDE 3 development, sooner or later it may become unusable with the latest generation of computers."

What To Expect From Windows 8

Filed under
Microsoft

katonda.com: Microsoft is reportedly working on the next version of Windows -- dubbed as Windows 8. Will that mean more hardware woes and vendor locked features. No one knows if your current machine will run on Windows 8 or not.

KDE Accessibility tools

Filed under
KDE

ghacks.net: For those with disabilities, using a computer can be a serious challenge. Whether it’s a vision impairment or physical challenge making the most of the PC seems nearly impossible. That is why, on every platform, you will find accessibility tools.

What Is Open Source Software?

Filed under
OSS
  • Back to Basics: What Is Open Source Software?
  • Observation on hiring from open source

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • GNOME Developer Training in danger
  • Linux Mint 9 KDE RC released
  • Opera 10.60 RC1
  • Nice collection of themes for Ubuntu | Gnome
  • Decibel Audio Player
  • Red Hat Still Doesn't Need Desktop Linux
  • Growing pains afflict HTML5 standardization
  • How to Sync Your iPhone Contacts to Ubuntu One
  • Ubuntu Circuit Breaker
  • Qt’s Volker Hilsheimer…
  • First Fedora Design Bounty Ninja identified
  • Spanish KDE Blogger Baltasar Ortega Talks
  • Droid X Arrives, and Froyo Goes Open Source
  • Rip CD's to MP3 in Debian
  • Integral Innovation
  • The Linux Action Show! s12e07

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Setting the ASUS Xonar U1 USB sound card in Gentoo
  • sshfs in gentoo (sshfs-fuse)
  • Listing files from Gentoo packages
  • Keeping You in the Loop – Bash For, While, Until
  • use Dropbox Online Backup Software in Ubuntu
  • NTP: Timing is Everything
  • Use Ctrl+Alt+Del for Task Manager to Kill Tasks Easily
  • Fixing the not quite transparent panel issue
  • How to run Linux in a virtual machine

Benchmarks Of The Latest Nouveau Gallium3D Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: In February we published some Nouveau Gallium3D benchmarks, but now we have a fresh set of numbers from three different NVIDIA graphics cards and we also compare the Nouveau Gallium3D driver to NVIDIA's proprietary Linux driver.

First MeeGo Linux needs love and scrub up

theregister.co.uk: MeeGo is a big deal. Devices plus cloud is the big trend right now and MeeGo has seen two industry giants - Intel and Nokia - combine efforts to create a Linux offering capable of competing with Windows on netbooks, Apple and Google on phones and tablets, and embedded operating systems on just about anything else from TVs to cars.

Debian Project News

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more