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Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Why Microsoft Must Control One Laptop Per Child

Filed under
OLPC

Bruce Perens: It's a threat Microsoft can't let stand: the entire third world learning Linux as children, and growing up to use it. And Microsoft is going to get its way.

Becta promises to do more to promote open source in UK schools

Filed under
OSS

Matthew Aslett: Becta on Wednesday published its full report in to Vista and Office 2007 and has stuck to its interim view that migration to the new versions is not recommended.

File Juggling with Krusader

Filed under
Software

linux journal: Konqueror, KDE's default file manager and browser, is a good all-around tool, but that doesn't necessarily mean it fits all your file management needs. Sometimes a dedicated file manager can be a better choice for daily computing. Krusader is a powerful and versatile file manager that can make your work more efficient and productive.

Best UMPC

Give Wine apps the look and feel of GNOME or KDE

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Wine allows users to run Windows programs natively under Linux without paying a dime. However, there's a tiny problem: programs running in Wine don't look so great. Luckily, with a little configuration editing, it's easy to make Wine applications look at lot more like the rest of the apps on your desktop.

linux.conf.au: What is Novell doing here?

Filed under
SUSE

iTWire: A GNU/Linux system does not normally load modules that are not released under an approved licence. So why should Australia’s national Linux conference take on board a sponsor who engages in practices that are at odds with the community?

Everex Releases CloudBook Ultra-Mobile PC

Filed under
Linux

tabletpcreview.com: Just when you thought the Asus Eee PC was the only low-priced ultraportable subnotebook on the market, Everex today launched their much anticipated Ultra-Mobile CloudBook (model CE1200V) featuring the latest Linux-based open source operating system from gOS.

Lovable LUGgable: support your Linux user group

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: There’s no denying that the widespread growth of Linux was due in part to the raw enthusiasm of advocates meeting together under the broad banner of a “LUG” – a Linux User Group. LUG members were pioneers and cowboys, early adopters and passionate hobbyists. Today, the LUG is different.

Lenovo's mystery handheld

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

c|net blogs: At Lenovo's press dinner the other night there was this unidentifiable handheld placed on display. No one--not even the PR people for Lenovo--could give me specific details. All they could say was that it runs Linux.

VectorLinux Releases First 64-bit Version

Filed under
Linux

The VectorLinux team is pleased to announce the first public beta release of VL64-5.9-beta1. This is our latest 5.9 release optimized for 64 bit processors.

Compiz Fusion Community News for January 10

Filed under
Software

At the the beginning of the year, I want to take you on a journey back. A journey that goes all the way back to the beginning of the year. We know and love this project, after suffering much hardship and conflict as ‘Compiz Fusion.‘

Microsoft denies dual-boot Linux/Windows XO laptops are on its agenda

Filed under
OLPC

blogs.zdnet: A day after published reports quoting Negroponte as saying OLPC XO laptops would dual boot Linux and Windows, Microsoft is denying that the company is pursuing such a plan.

Ubuntu Tweak off to a good start

Filed under
Software

linux.com: For years, discerning Windows users have relied on Tweak UI, a semi-official Microsoft program for system settings not available on the default desktop. Now, in the same tradition and with something of the same name, Ubuntu Tweak (UT) offers the same advantage to Ubuntu users.

Moving from MS Money to KMyMoney

Filed under
Software

movingtofreedom.org: At last. I’m free of Microsoft Money, and therefore very close to being free of all my old proprietary applications. I’ve settled on KMyMoney as a capable free-as-in-freedom bookkeeping replacement.

Shuttle's $199 Linux PC

Filed under
Linux

c|net blog: Shuttle introduced its $199 KPC Linux PC here on Tuesday. It'll have an Intel Celeron processor, a 945GC chipset, 512MB of memory and either a 60GB or 80GB hard drive.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Penguinistas hack Android onto real hardware

  • Asus EeePC spotted running SplashTop instant-on OS
  • Linux Kernel Source Code Screensaver
  • Driver-Free Car Runs Ubuntu Linux
  • Alsa Sucks
  • Windows Detox 101
  • KDE 4.0 Desktop blossoms
  • Linux keeps Alexa's engineers happy
  • Got my OLPC machine yesterday
  • Avoid Linux device support issues: A few minutes of research can make all the difference
  • Learning from D-Feet: a quick look at a new D-Bus debugger
  • Hidden Linux : Dailystrips
  • CES 2008: LinPus-A Linux Front End For Mobile Devices
  • Installing Linux over network
  • Ubuntu for the Windows converts

The choice of Linux

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: Many people claim that “Linux is about choice!”. That’s a neat phrase, but what does it mean? Does it mean that you should have the ability to twist and turn 400 different knobs on your Linux install? That’s what some think. Does it mean that you have the right to choose Linux, or choose your flavor of Linux, and then choose from the package sets within those flavors? That’s what I and many others think. There is a very distinct difference here too. Let’s look at it from a food point of view (one of my favorite points-of-view).

linux mint daryna on 450mhz k6-2, 256mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: In my seemingly eternal quest for a reasonable precompiled distro for my hideous old laptop, I turned to Linux Mint’s Fluxbox edition, thinking it might be an unusual enough variation from the original to solve some problems for me.

gOS Reloaded 2.0 Beta

Filed under
Linux

knolinux.com: I was happy as all get out to down the original version and try out on my laptop. Sad to say that I was never able to get encryption working on my wireless, but I was thrilled with the user interface.

Former OLPC CTO Aims to Create $75 Laptop

pcworld.com: A laptop under US$100 could reach desks if a new venture formed by former chief technology officer of One Laptop Per Child, Mary Lou Jepsen, can deliver on its promises.

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today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • GitHub Visualizes the Impact of Open Source
    Code repository GitHub published data visualizations that show the impact of open source development on hosted projects, along with the "shape" of project activity. The visualizations emphasize the effect of teamwork, collaboration and communication that reinforce coding efforts.
  • Meet Codemoji: Mozilla’s New Game for Teaching Encryption Basics with Emoji
    The above message may seem like a random string of emoji. But not so: When decoded, it reads: “Encryption Matters.” Today, Mozilla is launching Codemoji, a fun, educational tool that introduces everyday Internet users to ciphers — the basic building blocks of encryption — using emoji.
  • DSS, Inc. Releases New Version of Open Source EHR, vxVistA, to Healthcare IT Community
  • GuixSD system tests
  • Self-driving cars and open source - what about GPLv3 and anti-tivoization?
    Primarily, the car manufacturers say that their dislike of the GPLv3 software is due to security issues. According to them, it should not be possible for the car owners to modify the software of the car because this could lead to exposing the users themselves and other road users to danger. In the light of the above, is seems reasonable to question whether security considerations is actually the true reason for the car manufacturers not wanting the users to run their own software on the cars’ hardware. For many years, car owners have replaced parts of their cars, e.g. tires, brakes and even software – which is supported by the car industry. To give an example, there is a large market for the replacement or modification (“remapping”) of the Engine Control Units (“ECU”) software of cars. The ECU’s are computers that control the car’s engine, including fuel mix, fuel supply and gearing. The car industry takes advice and uses data from companies which offer ECU remapping and thereby indirectly supporting the companies although – according to the car industry – changes to the engine allegedly can pose a security risk. Another aspect of the matter is that stating that the clause in GPLv3 absolutely prohibits the car fabricants from forbidding the users running their own software on the hardware of the cars is not completely true. Section 7 of GPLv3 makes it possible for the creators of GPL programs to give the car factories an extra license under which it is possible to use the GPLv3 software in their cars without having to comply with the former-mentioned obligation to provide the installation information to the users of the cars. The way the system works now, the car industry allows modifications of cars which may cause a loss of security. It is possible to develop GPLv3 software that the car fabricants can use without having to allow the car owners modifications. Furthermore, it is only GPLv3 – and therefore not other FOSS licenses – which on a general level forces the car manufacturers to allow modifications of their software. The question of the security level of the cars should hardly be a hindrance to the use of FOSS in self-propelled cars. If the car fabricants could realize this, the many advantages of the freely-available source code could clear the way for the technology generally being adopted faster.
  • Open Source: It’s Not Just About Software Anymore
    Open source is no longer just about the software that sits on your computer. Open methods are being used to develop everything from better automobiles to life altering medical devices.
  • Kickstarting open source steampunk clocks that use meters to tell the time
    Kyle writes, "The Volt is a fully open source, arduino-based, handmade analog clock that tells time with meters. Available in a DIY install kit, 2 pre-made models, and a mix & match hardware option. The clocks are but with solid black walnut and maple, with faceplates produced in brass, copper, and steel. Only on Kickstarter!"
  • Libarchive Security Flaw Discovered
    When it comes to security, everyone knows you shouldn't run executable files from an untrustworthy source. Back in the late 1990s, when web users were a little more naive, it was quite common to receive infected email messages with fake attachments.

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