Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 60 New Open Source Apps You've (Probably) Never Heard Of srlinuxx 26/10/2011 - 1:21am
Story Adventures with Sabayon Linux srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 10:39pm
Story UEFI Headaches Begin For Linux Users srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 10:37pm
Story United for Unity alternatives srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 10:32pm
Story Linux Malware: Are We There Yet? srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 7:23pm
Story Is the popularity of GNU/Linux actually decreasing?? srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 7:21pm
Story Judging Ubuntu: Failures and Successes srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 7:20pm
Story What People Are Saying About GNOME [Part 1] srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 7:17pm
Story What Open Source Can Learn From Steve Jobs, Part 1 srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 4:54pm
Story New Style for YaST2 srlinuxx 25/10/2011 - 4:52pm

Instantbird: Mozilla-based instant messaging

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks: Instantbird is a new instant messaging application that merges two powerful open source projects: XULRunner, the stand-alone version of Firefox browsing engine; and libpurple, the library that gives Pidgin its ability.

Also: Firefox 2.0.0.8 update available now

Dumping Vista - A divorce with a happy ending

Filed under
Linux

iTToolbox Blogs: I recently posted my positive experience of installing Kubuntu on an old 1.7GHz machine that was taking 10 minutes to boot up XP. The registry was beyond repair and the various programs like Spybot, Adaware, PitStop, Defrag, and many others did little to improve performance. The desktop was destined for the dumpster. Enter Kubuntu.

Enlightenment - An easy-to-use Linux GUI

Filed under
Software

backyardgeek.blogspot: In the 10 years I've been using Linux, I've run the gamut of window managers and desktop environments: FvWM, FvWM95, ICEWM, AfterStep, BlackBox, KDE, GNOME, Beryl, Fluxbox, CDE, XFCE, Windowmaker, Sawfish, Metacity, WM2, as well as Compiz. But it seems that no matter how many times I try another Linux GUI, I always go back to Enlightenment.

GNOME 2.20.1 released

Filed under
Software

lwn.net: Version 2.20.1 of the GNOME desktop has been released. "This is the first update to GNOME 2.20.0. The update fixes all known and unknown crashers, even for those modules which haven't released a new version.

Why Bittorrent Matters

Filed under
Software

tipotheday.com: Ubuntu Gutsy came out today, which you should know unless you’ve had your head in the sand for the last week. Ubuntu has lots of mirrors. Lots. But it has even more users, most with a big fat broadband pipe. That’s more than enough to bring those mirrors to their knees.

How to create your own Debian/Ubuntu packages

Filed under
HowTos

openaddict.com: This really quick and dirty way to create your own Debian or Ubuntu packages can be done by anyone with little previous package creation experience. Even if you've never even compiled an application, I'll show you just how easy it is to download source code, compile the program and bundle everything up in a .deb package you can share with anyone.

Ballmer: Microsoft Will Buy Open-Source Companies

Filed under
Microsoft

CRN: Microsoft's detente with the open-source world is growing stronger by the minute. Steve Ballmer said today that he wouldn't consider an open-source-based business model a deterrent to buying a company Microsoft found interesting.

Also: Ballmer: Microsoft Will Buy 20 Companies a Year for 5 Years

ymus

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • 7.10, Awooga

  • Ubuntu 7.10 arrives, open for business
  • Ubuntu 7.10 - One sweet OS
  • Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy) Desktop Edition - Review
  • Ubuntu Gutsy Wireless Help
  • Quick Tips for Compiz on Gutsy
  • Dell and Ubuntu, sitting in a tree

Fedora - not that one - provides platform for interoperability

Filed under
Software

linux.com: A group of academicians at Cornell University argue that this new wave of applications should be constructed with interoperability in mind. The result of their research, funded by DARPA and NSF, is Fedora, the Flexible Extensible Digital Object Repository Architecture.

IP firm sued, settled with Novell on different patent in August

Filed under
Legal

zdnet blogs: The IP firm that filed patent litigation against Red Hat and Novell mounted legal threats against many other U.S. software companies in 2007 including Oracle, SAP, Computer Associates, EMC, Adobe, Autodesk, Apple, SPSS — and Novell.

Ubuntu 7.10 (rc) Gutsy Gibbon: Critical review

Filed under
Ubuntu

polishlinux: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon has been released today. I haven’t tested any alpha or beta versions of the new product from Canonical. I have decided to wait for the Release Candidate, since this has proved to work for me in the past. In short: it did not disappoint me.

Also: Tips for the impatient: downloading Ubuntu Gutsy
And: A gutsy new Linux system
&: How to get great custom effects in Ubuntu’s Gutsy Gibbon

Welcome back, user-defined motion paths in OpenOffice Impress 2.3

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org Tips: Back in the good old days of 1.x, you could draw a line, then draw an object, and make the object move along whatever line that was. It was great. Then the lovely redesign of Impress came, and that user-defined motion path feature got lost along the way. It's back!

Chris Blizzard Joining Mozilla’s Team

Filed under
Moz/FF

thetruthaboutmozilla.wordpress: The infamous Chris Blizzard, who now sits on the board of directors for the Mozilla Corporation and formerly sat on the board for the Mozilla Foundation, will be joining the Mozilla Corporation’s team as a full-time employee.

Smolt now with Hardware Rating Database and Wiki

Filed under
Software

liquidat: Smolt, a hardware statistics collecting program, got a major update. It now supports hardware rating and is connected to a Wiki to share solutions for hardware problems.

No Linux Love for New iPods: Why You Shouldn't Care

Filed under
Sci/Tech

OSWeekly: Newsflash for those of you who believe that we lost iPod support - we never had it in the first place. It's true, and frankly, the fact that Apple has decided to make themselves even more isolated in their own world is fine by me.

Latest incarnation of Novell bringing Linux to Asia

Filed under
SUSE

Bangkok Post: Novell Suse Linux is positioning itself to be the corporate Linux of choice for today's multi-OS corporation thanks to a series of agreements with companies such as SAP and Microsoft. In particular Novell is interested in the government sector in Asia.

These are not the sources we're looking for

Open Source and funky free ethics are no match for a good expensive closed application installed kid. There's a disturbance in the source.

Compiz Fusion Community News, for October 18, 2006

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress.com: Welcome to another edition of Compiz Fusion Community News. Over the past fortnight we have seen numerous fixes in preparation for the 0.6.0 release and some new features along the way. This week is also a big week for Compiz Fusion due to the release of a new ATI Driver (more about that later), and Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon.

A cursory look into KDE 4 file management: Dolphin beta

Filed under
Software

Rudd-O: Windows has Explorer. Mac OS has Finder. GNOME has Nautilus. And KDE had, up to a number of months ago, Konqueror. Now, together with the up-and-coming KDE 4, a simple file manager named Dolphin takes on file management. So how does Dolphin stack up?

Drupal: from a drop in the ocean to a big fish in the CMS world

Filed under
Drupal

pcworld: Drupal started out as a college experiment. The Open Source content management system now powers about 200,000 public facing Web sites and numerous intranet sites around the world. In this interview Dries Buytaert tells us all about the project which manifested from a chain of unexpected events.

Also: Drupal 4.7.8 and 5.3 released: Security updates and bugfixes.
And: Drupal 6.0 beta 2 released

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenStack Roundup

  • OpenStack Summit Returns to Austin With Much Fanfare
    Back in July 2010, 75 developers gathered at the Omni hotel here for the very first OpenStack Summit. At the time, OpenStack was in the earliest stages of development. In April 2016, OpenStack returned to Austin in triumph as the de facto standard for private cloud deployment and the platform of choice for a significant share of the Fortune 100 companies. About 7,500 people from companies of all sizes from all over the world attended the 2016 OpenStack Summit in Austin from April 25 to April 29. In 2010, there were no users, because there wasn't much code running, but in 2016, that has changed. Among the many OpenStack users speaking at the summit were executives from Verizon and Volkswagen Group. While the genesis of OpenStack was a joint effort between NASA and Rackspace, the 2016 summit was sponsored by some of the biggest names in technology today—including IBM, Cisco, Dell, EMC and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some highlights of the 2016 OpenStack Summit.
  • A Look Into IBM's OpenStack Meritocracy
    Angel Diaz, IBM vice president of Cloud Architecture and Technology, discusses how Big Blue has earned its place in the OpenStack community.
  • OpenStack cloud’s “killer use case”: Telcos and NFV
    Today, 114 petabytes of data traverse AT&T's network daily, and the carrier predicts a 10x increase in traffic by 2020. To help manage this, AT&T is transitioning from purpose-built appliances to white boxes running open source software. And according to AT&T Senior Vice President of Software Development and Engineering Sarabh Saxena, OpenStack has been a key part of this shift.

Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7

Here are some extra Linux distribution benchmarks for your viewing pleasure this weekend. Following the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS last week, I was running another fresh performance comparison of various Linux distributions on my powerful Xeon E3-1270 v5 Skylake system. I made it a few Linux distributions in before the motherboard faced an untimely death. Not sure of the cause yet, but the motherboard is kaput and thus the testing was ended prematurely. Read more

GhostBSD 10.3 ALPHA1 is now ready for Testing

Yes we skip 10.2 for 10.3 since was FreeBSD 10.3 was coming we thought we should wait for 10.3. This is the first ALPHA development release for testing and debugging for GhostBSD 10.3, only as MATE been released yet which is available on SourceForge and for the amd64 and i386 architectures. Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu-based Smartphones And Tablets Sound Good, On Paper, But...Do They Make Any Sense?
    As I previously stated in a recent article, I'm a huge fan of Ubuntu as a desktop operating system. It's friendly, reliable, consumes little resources and is largely virus-free.
  • Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ expected to be based on Ubuntu 16.04
    Elementary OS 0.4 ‘Loki’ coming soon, to be based on Ubuntu 16.04 and have plenty of new features
  • BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet - The heat is on
    Some investments are financial. Some are emotional. When it comes to Linux on tablets, my motives are mostly of the latter kind. I was super-excited to learn BQ was launching a tablet with Ubuntu, something that I have been waiting for a good solid three years now. We had the phone released last spring, and now there's a tablet. The cycle is almost complete. Now, as you know, I was only mildly pleased with the Ubuntu phone. It is a very neat product, but it is not yet as good as the competitors, across all shades of the usability spectrum. But this tablet promises a lot. Full HD, desktop-touch continuum, seamless usage model, and more. Let us have a look.
  • Kubuntu-16.04 — a review
    The kubuntu implementation of Plasma 5 seems to work quite well. It’s close to what I am seeing in other implementations. It includes the Libre Office software, rather than the KDE office suite. But most users will prefer that anyway. I’m not a big fan of the default menu. But the menu can easily be switched to one of the alternative forms. I’ve already done that, and am preferring the “launcher based on cascading popup menus”. If you are trying kubuntu, I suggest you experiment with the alternative formats to see which you prefer.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Review: Very Stable & Improved, Buggy Software Center, Though
    In almost all the occasions that I tested Ubuntu LTS releases, quite rightly so, they’ve always worked better than the non-LTS releases. And this Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, the 6th of such release is no exception. This one actually is even more impressive than the others because it has addressed some security related issues and even although not critical, subtle issues that I mentioned in the review. As far as the performance was concerned, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS was only largely outperformed by the memory usage where there is a large increase in memory usage. Other than that, those numbers look pretty good to me. That ‘.deb’ file issues with the Software Center is the only major concern that I can come up with. But I’m sure it’ll be fixed very soon.