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Thursday, 20 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open Source PLUS Open Standards are a “Smart Business Decision” Says E.U.

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Jim Zemlin: The New York Times reports today a hard rebuke from European Union’s competition commissioner, Neelie Kroes, against Microsoft’s tactics in Europe. Certainly when using any software this matters, but let’s take a closer look at how this advice relates to open source. Evaluate the following statement for accuracy. True or False?

UKUUG Court Case Falls at First Hurdle

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Legal The UK UNIX USER Group (UKUUG) looks likely to drop their legal challenge to Microsoft’s controversial international document standard because it doesn’t have the money to see the court case out.

Rapid Linux apps using object databases

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Software When you think of databases usually MySQL or Oracle or even Microsoft SQL Server come to mind. Yet, object oriented databases have the potential to cut down coding nuts and bolts and speed up app development time – particularly for those migrating to Linux from Windows. Here’s one such compelling SourceForge hosted open source system to do just this.

How to Dual Boot Linux and Windows XP

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HowTos Why choose between two operating systems when you can have both in one PC? We show you how to dual-boot Linux and Windows XP in the ASUS EeePC 900.

Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring released

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Mandriva today announces the release of Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring, the new release of its popular bootable distribution on a USB key. This new version uses the new Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring as its base, doubles the key's capacity to 8GB, introduces a new installer which allows you to install Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring to the system's hard disk, and comes in an attractive new white color scheme.

Spawn of Ubuntu

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Linux All the major distributions including Slackware, Red Hat, SUSE, Gentoo, and Debian have reproduced to the point where the children scarcely look like the parent. Now the children have grown up enough to begin procreating new and exciting distributions of their own for every whim and user type.

Linux in Education: Concepts Not Applications

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Linux One of the biggest arguments used against Linux in grade school level education is that we aren't teaching kids to use the applications they'll use in the "real world". As the Technology Director for a K-12 school district, I've heard that argument many times. After all these years, I still don't buy it.

Desktop Effects Power Consumption

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Software I recently installed the KDE4 version of Kubuntu on my laptop using the Wubi installer and was able to start using KWin's desktop effects on my laptop. After installing KDE4.1 beta 1 I started to get curious about battery life.

The Power of Plasma theming - a gallery of 23 themes

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liquidat.wordpress: One of the most often mentioned concerns at the KDE booth at LinuxTag was the question if Plasma would force the user to have a black panel. While we did have a second machine showing another theme to resolve all doubts it showed that not all users now yet the power of Plasma theming.

PCLinuxOS 2007: Funny name, serious distro

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PCLOS The last time I looked at PCLinuxOS was version 0.92, which according to DistroWatch was about 3 years ago. I was asked to take a look at it again, so here I go.

Review: TinyMe 2008

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PCLOS About a year ago we reviewed TinyMe when it was still in its beta and test stage. But a lot has happened in the past year, and all of it good. But what makes it so good? Well, in addition to fixing all the bugs and little quirks, TinyMe has become more stable and loads faster than it was in the early days.

Announcing GNOME Do 0.5: “The Fighting 0.5″

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blog.davebsd: It has been 41 days since we released GNOME Do 0.4.2, and today I’m honored to present GNOME Do 0.5: “The Fighting 0.5″. Without further ado, here are the main improvements and new features, accompanied by plenty of sexy screenshots.

What is the ultimate goal of Linux?

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blogs.ittoolbox: Microsoft has a goal. Apple has a goal. What is Linux's goal? Linux is such a large amoebic entity that it has no clear boundaries. There are no real limits to what Linux can be made to do.

Settling is Not Winning

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Linux Dear Red Hat, I know it might have been cheaper and definitely shorter this way, and I know your North American users will think you did it right, but it's NOT right!

Chiron FS lets you set up RAID-1 over the network

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HowTos The Linux kernel includes support for performing RAID-1 in software. RAID-1 maintains the same filesystem on two or more disks, so that you can lose all but the last disk and still retain all of your data. This seems wonderful until you consider that an error in RAM, a power supply failure, or another hardware component in the machine can still potentially corrupt your precious data.

Invigorating GNOME

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Software There has been some discussion recently about the future of GNOME. Although I am an ardent supporter and fanboy around GNOME, and I love the desktop for its simplicity and elegance…GNOME has become the software equivalent of my dad’s comfortable trousers - predictable and reliable.

Red Hat settles 2 patent lawsuits filed against it

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Legal Business software maker Red Hat Inc said on Wednesday that it has settled two of three pending patent lawsuits that the company has been fighting.

Open source vs. proprietary? Turn the question around!

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OSS Several decades ago the software 'industry' managed to re-write our perception of history and make most people believe that proprietary software is normal, and open source is the aberration, while in reality software actually started out as open. It is time to change our thinking and to stop trying to justify the use of open source software.

OpenOffice 3.0

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OOo OpenOffice 3.0 shows that you don't have to pay a bundle for a great office suite — in fact, you don't even have to pay a penny. OpenOffice 3.0 is a free, open-source software suite that provides most of what anyone could want in an office suite.

Also: Openoffice vs Microsoft Office
And: I'm actually using OpenOffice Writer

today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu Eee 8.04: Custom Ubuntu distro for the Eee PC

  • Shuttleworth talks up app launcher for 'netbooks'
  • Neelie Kroes: "Choosing open standards is a very smart business decision"
  • template collections
  • 2008 Open Source CMS Award Details Announced
  • Testing ebook readers for Project Gutenberg
  • Xubuntu Hardy died on me… Testing Gentoo Linux
  • Four national standards bodies appeal against approval of ISO/IEC DIS 29500 (PR)
  • Let's stop playing the numbers game: free software has changed the game.
  • Violate the GPL at your own risk
  • The amazing power of the community: real numbers from Apache
  • New FSF online store
  • Monitoring and Display Commands For LVM On Linux And Unix
  • Gentoo Linux Live USB key
  • Chapter 3: Configuring your project with Autoconf
  • Ubuntu Hardy on Compaq Presario 1240 (Living Without X)
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ARTIK is the Tizen’s Trojan Horse to dominate the IoT ecosystem

As part of the Forum “Tizen for the Internet of Things” held on September 22 in Moscow, Samsung Electronics has presented a new family of maker boards and modules named ARTIK, in addition to the infrastructure of the operating system Tizen 3.0. Samsung ARTIK’s value proposition, as declared by Samsung, is to reinvent the prototyping process by leveraging world-class data security granted by the company as well as a wide array of tools, both hardware and software, such as the ARTIK Modules and Cloud, formerly known as SmartThings Open Cloud. Read more

today's leftovers

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow