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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Maxwell GPUs Light Up On Linux 3.15 Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 7:37pm
Story Canonical Releases the Most Stable and Advanced Ubuntu Touch Version So Far Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 7:32pm
Story How to run XP on Linux Mint with Oracle VirtualBox Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 7:15pm
Story MakuluLinux: Awesome Debian-Based Distro Ships with MATE 1.8 Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 7:09pm
Story It Doesn't Look Like AMD Mantle Is Coming To Linux, SteamOS Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 5:27pm
Story Cinnamon 2.2 Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 5:23pm
Story UK's IT security agency: Communities are key for standards Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 5:07pm
Story GCC 4.9 Compiler Optimization Benchmarks For Faster Binaries Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 5:00pm
Story DPL election is over, Lucas Nussbaum re-elected Rianne Schestowitz 14/04/2014 - 4:56pm
Forum topic Elive 1.6 is out!!! joenosleep 3 14/04/2014 - 4:56pm

Sapphire Radeon HD 4670 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Earlier this month the ATI Radeon HD 4600 series from AMD was unveiled as the new mid-range graphics cards derived from their flagship RV770 graphics core. The Radeon HD 4650 and Radeon HD 4670 are the two RV730-based products now available. The ATI Radeon HD 4670 may not be able to compete with the Radeon HD 4800 series in all of the tests, but at a price of under $100 USD is it worth pursuing?

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Pidgin NoSound Solution

  • Emergency Booting RedHat Linux With USB
  • Finding log files X number of days old and deleteing them
  • How to add KDE to Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1
  • Fwknopping your way to success with Single Packet Authorisation

A new version of AmigaOS

Filed under
OS

arstechnica.com: From its very inception, the Amiga has been about defying conventional wisdom. Sadly, these days the Amiga is no longer breaking new ground technologically. However, the platform continues to defy conventional wisdom.

Gentoo: New release strategy to provide more current install media

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org: In future releases, Gentoo will focus on a more back-to-basics approach that will give you up-to-date install media on a regular basis and make much better use of our human resources. Consequently, we're canceling the 2008.1 release.

Wubi Tuesday

Filed under
Ubuntu

itpro.co.uk/blogs: I have a sneaking feeling that after having done all that back in the days of the 0.8 kernel and with more than a handful of Gentoo installs, I really should I be feeling a little guilty as to just how easy it was to get a dual-boot Linux install working on my main desktop PC.

Few tips for selecting the best Linux apps

Filed under
Software

cyberciti.biz: GNU/Linux and open source software offers lots of choices to end users. This can create a problem for new users. Most Linux distributions provide a program for browsing a list of thousands of free software applications that have already been tested.

Umit, the graphical network scanner

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: Umit is a user-friendly graphical interface to Nmap that lets you perform network port scanning. The utility's most useful features are its stored scan profiles and the ability to search and compare saved network scans.

Get some attitude for aptitude

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Many times when looking around the internet for the rare program that is not in the repository. Or even if you want a newer version of a program that is in the repository. You will find that some sites have pre-prepared binary packages which can be downloaded and installed.

Viewing the Night Sky with Linux, Part III: Stellarium and Celestia

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Parts I and II of this series covered covered the "planetarium" programs KStars and XEphem. They can answer pretty much any question about what's where and when in the night sky. But they don't really give you the feeling of being there like a couple of newer entries on the Linux astronomy scene: Stellarium and Celestia.

CME Group joins Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

finextra.com: Derivatives exchange operator CME Group has joined the Linux Foundation, with its associate director Vinod Kutty taking on the chair of the organisation's end user council.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Eee PC: Xandros Vs Eee-ubuntu

  • Gentoo: Improve boot time…
  • Microsoft, Mozilla, Google Talk Browser Futures
  • IBM Lotus Symphony: The Ubuntu Beta
  • The command line is nothing to be afraid of
  • 13 Terminal Emulators for Linux
  • VirtualBox update brings improved performance and 64-bit support
  • Linux Foundation courts individual members
  • Year One with the Linux Based NAS Server
  • KDE 4 drawing performance on nvidia
  • Linux Plumbers Conf: Linus - Git Tutorial
  • Just switched to the Paludis package manager
  • linux-0.01 on Ubuntu
  • OpenSUSE 11 First Impressions
  • Fraught laptop project takes aim at digital divide and poverty
  • ReiserFS File System Corruption and Linux Recovery
  • Linux Outlaws 56 - Have You Had Your Eyes Tested Lately?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reset Your Forgotten Ubuntu Password in 2 Minutes or Less

  • Installing Real Player and Configuring Mozilla Plugin
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 2
  • Basic APT commands
  • Install VirtualBox 2 Guest Additions in Ubuntu
  • Charting your boot processes with bootchart
  • How To: Increase Battery Life in Ubuntu or Debian Linux
  • Running CrossOver Chromium aka "Google Chrome" under Ubuntu
  • Changing what time a process thinks it is with libfaketime

OS stuff (opensuse, ubuntu, windows)

Filed under
OS
  • openSUSE Build Service built openSUSE 11.1 beta 1

  • openSUSE 11.1 beta 1 e1000e driver issue
  • Short Blog on openSUSE
  • What’s Red Hat Doing in the Virtualization Business?
  • Oops! Ubuntu IS gearing up for more kernel contribution

  • Ubuntu loses its virginity, turns commercial
  • Widening Canonical's Commercial Software Pipeline
  • Ubuntu Ibex Alpha 6 Review
  • More Windows 7 M3 Screenshots Leaked

  • Microsoft refers to its anti-Linux playbook to attack VMware
  • Windows 7 versus Generic Linux Distro

Open Source Headlines

  • Open Source makes historic UK breakthrough

  • Open source company wins Becta accreditation (PR)
  • Stanford and Harvard teach businesses how to squash open source
  • Is "open source" a matter of license or employment?
  • Open-source founders doubling up on startups
  • Consolidation and open source: Not likely anytime soon
  • Open source and the box era
  • How big the Google open source credibility gap
  • Google throws down open source gauntlet
  • Two Views of Enterprise Open Source
  • Let's talk cheap software
  • Attorney Shaalu Mehra discusses emerging GPL trends (video)

"what about Canonical's work on the desktop?"

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: One main question that I saw a lot, and was even asked about during my talk, was "what about Canonical's work on the desktop/Gnome/KDE"? I really don't know if they have contributed a lot of effort back upstream on these projects, that wasn't my point here.

How2 ... join the Linux movement

Filed under
Linux

stuff.co.nz: The Linux movement has taken off and Dave Thompson goes undercover to find out how to join. Every week we get someone asking about Linux what is it, why is it and should I do it? The answer is complicated.

Ohio LinuxFest 2008 Preview

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: The Greater Columbus Convention Center will host this year's annual Ohio LinuxFest, which will take place on October 10-11. Now at its sixth edition, the Ohio LinuxFest will include a large expo and popular speakers, while welcoming free software developers, open source enthusiasts and virtually anyone who is interested.

One Desktop Per Ten A Workable Model

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: The Digital Divide -- there isn't a nation where it doesn't exist, yet it seems so relative. In one place, a child going online via dial up using a PII seems at a disadvantage. Elsewhere, that child has a tool that could change his life. Open source has much to offer here.

How Linux lost the battle for your desktop

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: A few years ago, it looked like Linux might – just might – take over the world. Companies like Lindows/Linspire were going to make it easy enough for your mother to use. Bright coloured boxes of SUSE and Red Hat and plenty of others were piled high in every computer store. It was going to be a whole new era. Except it didn't really happen, did it?

What’s GNU, Part Four: find

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: A few months ago, we finished the third of a series about features added to longstanding utility programs. This month we’ll look at the new features that GNU programmers and others have added to all of the other features that find(1) already had.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?