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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 05 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Will a Spoonful of Mint Help the GNOME 3 Go Down? srlinuxx 14/11/2011 - 7:00pm
Story Linux loses its luster as a darling among developers srlinuxx 14/11/2011 - 6:58pm
Story Is Ubuntu’s Dominance on Personal Desktops Slipping? srlinuxx 14/11/2011 - 6:56pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 14/11/2011 - 6:40pm
Blog entry If you'd like to look at my Fluxbox Files blackbelt_jones 6 14/11/2011 - 4:25am
Story 2 cool reasons to use the K Desktop Environment srlinuxx 14/11/2011 - 1:08am
Story Interview: Fabio Erculiani, Sabayon Linux srlinuxx 14/11/2011 - 1:06am
Story New Desktop Interface Flops srlinuxx 14/11/2011 - 1:04am
Story Chakra Edn 2011.11 review srlinuxx 1 14/11/2011 - 12:17am
Story Firefox 10, What’s New? srlinuxx 13/11/2011 - 9:10pm

If you’re going to bash Steve Ballmer, don’t hold back on the ammo

Filed under
MDV

zdnet blogs: If you’re going to put an open letter out there for commentary don’t be shy about the details. Bancilhon implies that Microsoft fought dirty. Is this dirty as in illegal? Or just the usual cloak and dagger stuff in the technology market? Were there smear tactics? Just wondering if we have a federal (DOJ, FTC etc) offense.

Online desktop confusion

wadejolson.wordpress.com: For me, Las Vegas walks the fine line between interesting and inane. And so it is with web services and the talk of a mysterious gnome online desktop. Just the right mix of buzz words and ambiguity to keep me confused. What’s an online desktop?

HP Backs Red Hat in Government Biz Bid

Filed under
Linux

internetnews: When it comes to big enterprise IT deployments in the U.S., there is no enterprise bigger than the federal government itself. Linux vendor Red Hat is hoping for a larger portion of the government's multi-billion dollar IT spending with its widest-ever array of security certifications, thanks to assistance from HP.

JACK Sync: A Primer For Linux Users

linux journal: Recently I've been working with the transport synchronization capabilities of the JACK audio server. This article is a report on those capabilities as tested with a variety of Linux audio applications under the JAD and 64 Studio distributions.

StartCom MultiMedia Edition ML-5.0.6 Review

Filed under
Linux

The previous versions were a lot better, and I strongly supported their cause. Now with this release the cause is gone, and a new commercial identity is in place. The system crashes a lot, seems like there was no testing done at all. Just stay away from StartCom, Fedora is lot better, stable and reliable.

Ubuntu Developer Summit lays out vision for strong Hardy Heron release

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: The first day of the Ubuntu Developer Summit began with roundtable sessions which focused on high-level planning for Hardy Heron, the next major release of the Ubuntu Linux distribution. I attended the Hardy Heron desktop roundtable to get the inside scoop about the future of Ubuntu on the desktop.

X-Files movie sequel is go

Filed under
Movies

the register: The shoot of the second X-Files movie will kick off on 10 December in Vancouver, 20th Century Fox has announced.

YaST Tools for Creating Installation Media and Appliances

Filed under
Software

opensuse news: The casual reader of news.opensuse.org knows that openSUSE 10.3 contains a YaST tool for creating images using KIWI. However, it is not that known fact that openSUSE 10.3 contains much more tools to manipulate RPM-based software and wrap it into a numerous ways for delivery, from a simple repository to a complete appliance creation.

Downwards compatibility during long time development

Filed under
Linux

liquidat: Microsoft’s Larry Osterman described in a recent blog entry that there will be no totally reworked Windows kernel after Vista due to the need of downwards compatibility. The argument however raises the question if Linux could be faced by a similar problem.

Book Review: Linux Firewalls

Filed under
Linux

linuxsecurity.com: Security is at the forefront of everyone's mind and a firewall can be an integral part of your Linux defense. But is Michael's Rush's "Linux Firewalls," the newest release from NoStarchPress, up for the challenge? Eckie S. here at Linuxsecurity.com gives you the low-down on this newest addition to the Linux security resource library and how it's one of the best ways to crack down on attacks to your Linux network.

DesktopBSD Day 1 - Getting started

Filed under
BSD

opensourcelearning.info/blog: A new day, a new month and a new challenge. For the next thirty days I will again plunge into the world of *BSD, this time using DesktopBSD. My aim is to write everyday about my experiences with DesktopBSD, the pros and cons, the good and the bad, the smart and the stupid.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Simplify backups with Synbak

  • Setup your own apache server to host your weblog free
  • How to remove blank lines and comments from a file
  • Back up and print your blog with OpenOffice.org Base
  • Ubuntu Linux Restore admin / root level permissions
  • Rewriting email headers in exim

Why Linux Will Succeed On The Desktop

Filed under
Linux

informationweek: I believe Linux will become the de-facto standard desktop operating system. Though it'll take a while for many users to break free from ties to Windows, there is good reason to believe that this day will come.

Ubuntu vs OpenSUSE

Filed under
Ubuntu

abhay-techzone.blogspot: OpenSUSE impresses from the first boot, of the install CD, itself. I was greeted with a beautiful screen screen. Ubuntu too does a good job but them SUSE reflects elegance.

Microsoft Not to Open Source Codes in China

Filed under
Microsoft

tradingmarkets.com: It is still unknown whether Microsoft would fulfill the obligations in the Chinese market. An insider remarked that China just passed the antitrust law and has not put it into effect officially, so it is impossible for the company to come up with a timetable for the disclosure of its source codes.

Computer Dealers short of staff trained to Install Ubuntu Linux ?

Filed under
Ubuntu

oskanpur.wordpress: Kanpur and Lucknow computer dealers who have for years been selling proprietary operating systems are suddenly realizing that they themselves know very little about Ubuntu Linux operating system for desktops.

Being a good netizen – protecting Linux from network nasties

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Microsoft Windows attracts virus writers and malware like faeces attracts flies. On the far opposite end of the spectrum, Linux users never find themselves embroiled in debates over whether Norton AntiVirus is bloated or essential, or whether AVG is better than e-Trust. Yet, Linux users do need to put thought and effort into security tools and here’s why.

Open source project aims to overhaul music search

Filed under
Software

computerworld: Software that listens to and analyzes music is driving a Sun open source project, which aims to build a music recommendation system that surpasses the systems used today by iTunes and Amazon.

Overcoming the Fear of Linux CLI

Filed under
HowTos

junauza.blogspot.com: I will list some indispensable commands and keyboard shortcuts with their corresponding functions to guide the fearful in their journey to conquer the horror of using the Linux terminal.

Creating a book template with Writer

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: While Writer allows you to create an advanced book template that consists of a master document and a number of subdocuments, there are situations where using a simpler, one-file template makes more sense. The main advantage of a one-file book template is that it helps you to work around two major problems in Writer.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat pilots new leadgen program in Canada targeting the mid-to-high market

Fedora: The Latest

  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues
    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.
  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA
    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.
  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA
    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!

Leftovers: Debian

  • The Pyra - handheld computer with Debian preinstalled
    The machine is a complete ARM-based PC with micro HDMI, SATA, USB plugs and many others connectors, and include a full keyboard and a 5" LCD touch screen. The 6000mAh battery is claimed to provide a whole day of battery life time, but I have not seen any independent tests confirming this. The vendor is still collecting preorders, and the last I heard last night was that 22 more orders were needed before production started.
  • New sources for contributors.debian.org
    Many people might not be aware of it, but since a couple of years ago, we have an excellent tool for tracking and recognising contributors to the Debian Project: Debian Contributors Debian is a big project, and there are many people working that do not have great visibility, specially if they are not DDs or DMs. We are all volunteers, so it is very important that everybody gets credited for their work. No matter how small or unimportant they might think their work is, we need to recognise it!
  • What's new since Jessie?
    Jessie was released one year ago now and the Java Team has been busy preparing the next release.

Leftovers: OSS

  • The New Kingmakers and the Next Step for Open Source
  • Puppet Rebrands, Launches Numerous New Projects
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Fast-forward to today, and Puppet Labs is changing its name to mark a new era, and is out with several new product initiatives. The organization, now known as just Puppet, has also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who comes to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president.
  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.
  • Jeremy Sands: Southern Fried College Football and Down-Home Linux
    This is a “Meet the Man Behind the Curtain” interview. It’s more about Sands than about either csnbbs.com or the LinuxFest he spends so much of his time organizing. But at the end of the interview, he talks about how the LinuxFest can always use more volunteers, even if all you can do is woman or man the registration desk for an hour. And sponsors? It’s a pretty healthy operation financially, but more sponsors are always welcome — especially ones from the Southeast, because this conference is proudly regional, not something identical to what you might find in, say, Los Angeles or Washington State.
  • A daughter of Silicon Valley shares her 'nerd' story
    In the end, I had to leave my job at ISC. Luckily, my work and my values brought me to Mozilla, where I've been both perseverant and lucky enough to have several meaningful roles. Today, I'm the senior program manager of diversity and inclusion. I work full-time on building a more diverse and inclusive Mozilla, standing on the shoulders of giants who did the same before me and in partnership with many of the smartest and kindest people I know. I've followed my passion for empowering people to find meaningful ways to contribute to the Internet I believe the world needs: an expansion of the one that excited me so long ago. And I get to see a lot of the world while I do it!
  • Waiting for Plugins: The Nylas N1 Email Client
    I wish the Nylas N1 team the best. I love that they took the time to build a Linux client. I love the idea of a hackable email client. But Nylas N1, as it stands now, is very limited. If you happen to like the defaults, you’re in for a treat. But if you’re looking for an email client that bends to your will and that you can easily customize as a non-developer, you’re probably better off with Thunderbird (especially now that people are thinking about its future). Thunderbird isn’t pretty—certainly not as pretty as Nylas N1—but it lets you build it into whatever email client you want it to be.
  • RightScale, Focused on the Cloud, Delivers Docker Container Management
  • Drupal developer on how to make your website more accessible
    For open source developer Mike Gifford, founder and president of OpenConcept Consulting Inc., any mention of Drupal accessibility after his name is redundant. He has spent the better part of 10 years improving and cementing accessibility in Drupal, enough to earn the role of official core accessibility maintainer for the project. Accessibility awareness has grown considerably in the Drupal community, but the Internet changes rapidly and the software needs to keep up to remain relevant. Recent press on the trend of decoupling Drupal—including the milestone post by project founder Dries Buytaert himself—tends to skirt the issue that so-called headless configurations can blot out accessibility functions designed for the theme layer.
  • DuckDuckGo Gives $225,000 to Open Source Projects
    It appears as if people have been using DuckDuckGo’s privacy centered search enough to make the company successful. Certainly not we-control-the-world successful like Google, but successful enough to give it some cash-on-hand breathing room. Also successful enough for the company to give back to the community by handing out $225,000 to some free and open source projects.
  • DuckDuckGo's 2016 open source donations
  • H2020 submission is rather 'anti-open'
    So what's the EC's current stand with forcing citizens to use Adobe's proprietary, closed technology and only Windows or Mac for submission of H2020 projects? With Adobe retiring Linux versions of Acrobat a couple of years ago (yes you can still download an obsolete version for Linux from Adobe's FTP but it won't work with ECAS "A forms"), this is a very "anti-open" situation.
  • It's Time to Open Source Moving Vehicles
    Open source software has made its mark on desktop computing, mobile phones, and the internet of things. But one area yet to be cracked wide open with freely distributed software is mobility: from autonomous cars, software-assisted driving, to connecting vehicles to other devices. On Wednesday, Arthur Taylor, chief technology officer at Advanced Telematic Systems, presented an open-source platform that he hopes will be the start of more innovation in software development for mobility technologies. But he also argued for the merits of open source software in a space pretty much dominated by the closed-off products of large corporates, such as Google and Uber.
  • Next Phase of Development Begins for The Hovalin, An Open Source 3D Printed Violin
    The Hovalin, developed by Matt and Kaitlyn Hova, is a open source 3D printed violin that has received much attention since the first version was released. Now the next phase of development has begun for the Hovalin 3.0, and Matt Hova has posted a blog entry and started a Reddit thread about the project that always keeps improving in a collaborative effort by many Hovalin fans. In the Hovalin website blog post, Hova explains what the most recent plans are for the latest version. First, version 3.0 will “move away from the current carbon fiber rectangle to an 8 mm rod.” Also, a lock will be created that will be used to keep the top and bottom pieces together. Custom brims to prevent warping will be added, as well as possible chin and shoulder rests. Finally, Hova wants to “work out a new system for distributing multiple options for the .stls including files with brim, files without brim, pre-sliced files with supports for the middle piece.” There are many changes in the works here, as you can see from just this list alone.