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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Fixing Linux: wishlist for Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcauthority.com.au: With Ubuntu 8.04 "Hardy Heron" now in feature-freeze in preparation for its April release, the Ubuntu developers have started planning for Ubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex", which is due this October. Ubuntu is my distribution of choice, but it's definitely not perfect, so I've come up with a list of improvements I'd like to see by the time 8.10 ships.

Open Voices Podcast with Mark Shuttleworth

Filed under
OSS

linux-foundation.org: This Open Voices installment features Mark Shuttleworth of Canonical, who sheds light on the roots of Ubuntu, trust relationships, his desire for increased collaboration in the Linux community and much more in a casual conversation with Jim Zemlin.

80th Annual Academy Awards Winners

Filed under
Movies

The 80th Annual Academy Awards is now history and although it still seems to lack the luster of "the old days," we still find ourselves drawn toward the star-studded festivities. There were a few surprises this evening in the awards recipients, but it was a good show.

Is Linux Ready for Prime Time?

Filed under
Linux

blog.laptopmag.com: My problems with the CloudBook last weekend had me wondering, is there something wrong with me or something wrong with the CloudBook or, maybe, is there something wrong with Linux itself?

Linux on a Dell Inspiron 1501

Filed under
Linux

blog.genewilburn.com: Since I’ve retired from IT work, I don’t have much chance to keep my Unix skills fresh so when it came time for a new laptop, I decided I’d devote it primarily to Linux, with a dual-boot option to Windows. One of Dell Canada’s least expensive laptops at the beginning of 2008 was the Inspiron 1501.

Sound filtering... with the Gimp!

Filed under
GIMP

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Gimp is universally used for image manipulation. However, with a bit of creativity and a couple of tricks, it can also be used as an audio filter! Here is how…

more FOSDEM 2008 stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Project VGA Hopes To Ship Next Month

  • Metisse X Window System Roadmap
  • XvMC To Support More Video Standards?
  • FOSDEM done, but disappointed about Mandriva
  • KDE at FOSDEM, Day 1
  • KDE at FOSDEM, Day 2

howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Drastically Speed up your Linux System with Preload

  • Installing NetBeans 6.0 on Ubuntu-7.10
  • Working with Songbird and wma files
  • How to change apache2 default charset in Ubuntu
  • How to Create a custom keyboard shortcut in Ubuntu
  • Speed up QEMU with KVM
  • Generate a graph using Gruff
  • How to change apache2 default charset in Ubuntu

Open source gains business credibility

Filed under
OSS

silicon.com: The use of open source is on the rise in the corporate IT environment as organisations look to cut the cost of developing and using software.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu; Workspace moving

  • Creating DVD Movies with Ubuntu
  • How to: Easy Remote Access Connection to Ubuntu
  • Sopcast with GUI and sop:// URLs in Ubuntu
  • Howto: Request A Package For Ubuntu
  • Setting up a bazaar server

Wubi arrives: a look at Ubuntu 8.04 alpha 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: The Ubuntu development community has announced that the fifth Ubuntu 8.04 prerelease is now available for testing. Ubuntu 8.04 alpha 5 adds additional polish and reliability as well as a few intriguing new features. We tested alpha 5 to get a first look at the new features in action and to see how it compares to alpha 4.

Bootchart: boot profiling

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: On a recent vacation my laptop boot time (>4 min.) started getting on my nerves. I resolved to enjoy the vacation but fix things on my return. At home a few minutes with Google brought bootchart to my attention.

Interview with Tristan Nitot, President, Mozilla Europe

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

groklaw: This is Sean Daly reporting for Groklaw. I'm at FOSDEM 1 in Brussels, and I'm seated here with Tristan Nitot who is president of Mozilla Europe. I would like to ask you a few questions. First of all, could you tell me how many Mozilla developers are here in Brussels this weekend?

Stallman relinquishing reins of GNU Emacs after 32 years

Filed under
Software

networkworld.com: After more than three decades of work, the message from Richard Stallman, creator of the GNU Emacs text editor and keeper of its flame since 1976, couldn't possibly have been more matter of fact: Stefan and Yidong offered to take over, so I am willing to hand over Emacs development to them.

Open Source Coders Keep Open Mind About Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

pcworld.com: After hearing Microsoft's pledge to open the code for many of its applications and perusing at least some of the first documentation, reaction in the open-source community is varied.

Linux software that sux

Filed under
Software

ipozgaj.blogspot: OpenOffice - Good for writing small documents, 50 pages at most. I wrote my diploma thesis in OOo and it was a painful experience. The funniest thing was when I tried to turn the changes tracking on document with 70 pages.

The true cost of one laptop per child

Filed under
OLPC

itwire.com: Late last year Uruguay landed its first shipment of 100,000 units of the much lauded, sometimes criticised XO laptop from the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) organisation. The question is, however, can the likes of Peru, Mexico, Ethiopia, Haiti, Rwanda, Mongolia and a myriad of other impoverished countries stump up with the cash needed to join the OLPC bandwagon?

Network Diagnostic Tool (NDT) On Ubuntu 7.10 Server

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide will walk you through the setup process for implementing NDT running under Ubuntu 7.10 Server. For those unfamiliar with NDT, it is a network performance testing application.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Clear screen without losing the current command

  • KDE4 : Removing the annoying Konsole beeps
  • Howto Monitor SMART and sensor data with Munin
  • Savage 2 Linux beta client coming within weeks
  • Radeon Driver Gets Textured Video (Xv)
  • OSS R500 Driver Gets Textured Video Too
  • Yahoo could be Microsoft’s ‘prove it’ moment on open source interoperability
  • Android Code Day: gateway to a new kind of application
  • KDE 4 on old hardware
  • More Mepis
  • Testing the Linux Waters
  • Wet, Miserable and Linux
  • This Is Why I Love Linux So Much!
  • My Computer Lab nearly ready
  • Tips from a PCLinuxOS User on Buying a PC and Using an OS

Kubuntu 7.10 Review.

Filed under
Reviews

I have been a fan of (K)Ubuntu since ages. It goes back to the 5.x days. I have been using the 6.06 LTS till now. I like the LTS concept and would definitely try to stick with that.

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