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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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2.6.26-rc4, "Things Are Calming Down"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "You know the drill by now: another week, another -rc," began Linux creator, Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.26-rc4 kernel. "There's a lot of small stuff in here", he continued, "most people won't even notice. "

Open source on the wire

Filed under
OSS

idg.no: Once upon a time, using open-source servers and applications for business was frowned upon in many circles. Today, you'd be hard pressed to find any sizeable infrastructure that doesn't leverage open-source code in some form or another.

EeePC 900 running 8.04 OOTB from ZaReason

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ubuntu-rocks.org/blog: I picked up an Asus EeePC 900 from ZaReason and it arrived today. Now, on the order form it says Xandros but I mentioned in a comment that it would soon be running Ubuntu. Within two minutes of placing the order they replied saying they can put a basic Ubuntu install on it, so I said “heck yeah!”.

GNOME file manager gets tabbed file browsing

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Although Nautilus—the GNOME file manager—includes many useful features and offers an excellent implementation of the spatial paradigm, its browser mode is less impressive and is missing some must-have functionality. The Nautilus developers are about to deliver a big improvement, however, with the addition of full support for tabbed browsing.

Paying The "Linux Tax"

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com/blog: Most of us know about the "Windows Tax" -- the extra cash you shell out to pay for the cost of a Windows license when you buy a new PC. But what about a (so-called) "Linux Tax," the cost incurred by an ordinary user switching to Linux from Windows?

Mozilla makes Firefox 3.0 bug-fix decision

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. decided today to roll out a second release candidate for Firefox 3.0 that will include fixes for about 40 bugs. The alternative was to declare the open-source browser good "as is," then patch the problems with a later update.

Also: Mozilla Developer News May 27

Why the pre-loaded Linux Desktop is important

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

practical-tech.com: I will never cease to be amazed at how fast things change and how quickly people forget. Today’s example is a Slashdot posting with the title, “Why Buy a PC Preloaded with Linux?” Specifically, the dotter—slasher really doesn’t give the right tone—wants to know “‘Why should I buy a PC preloaded with Linux?’

RIP, Levanta

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: It seemed like such a great idea. Linux is moving from edge and departmental servers to the data center, so why not offer Linux data center automation, complete with virtualization Linux lifecycle management? Well, maybe it's still a great business idea, but Levanta wasn't able to make a go of it.

Penny Arcade: Linux Screenshots

Filed under
Gaming

polishlinux.org: Hothead Games together with Penny Arcade released a very interesting game called “Penny Arcade Adventures: On the Rain-Slick Precipice of Darkness”. It can be purchased at $20 in Greenhouse Internet store, which is a counterpart of more known Steam Games. Nothing peculiar, you say? And you’d be right if not for one small detail: the game is available also for GNU/Linux.

LinuxWorld Expo to Offer Installfest for Needy Schools

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: As the LinuxWorld Expo conference, slated for August 4th to 7th in San Francisco, starts to take shape, more news is emerging about events to happen there. At LinuxWorld, Untangle is organizing an Installfest event to donate open source (Ubuntu) computers to schools in need of technology resources.

30 Similarities between PowerPoint and Impress

Filed under
OOo

fanaticattack.com: This article is to emphasize the similarities between the OpenOffice.org Impress and Microsoft Office PowerPoint presentation tools. These are the things you can instantly do with no relearning. I hope that not only will this show some of the similarities but will show you some shortcuts you might not have known about in either program.

Multiple live CDs in one DVD

Filed under
Software

share4vn.com: Live CDs do a great job of advertising Linux distributions. In addition to general-purpose live CD distributions, there are lots of task-oriented live CDs. Wouldn’t it be great if you could carry multiple live CDs on one DVD disc?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Secure and anonymous browsing with Firefox and TorK

  • Bash Regular Expressions
  • Using Perl On Linux To Do Mass Synchronization Of File Time Stamps
  • How to use the easiest Linux version
  • Edit and compare giant binary files with lfhex
  • Conky: A Quick Guide
  • Using your 3G/CDMA plug-and-play usb modems for mobile broadband
  • How to Lock Down GNOME
  • Tip: Sound in Tremulous under Ubuntu PulseAudio
  • Blogging with Movable Type 4.1
  • How To Downgrade To Firefox 2 In Ubuntu Hardy
  • Building a New Computer - Part 2: Putting it Together

KDE 4.1 Beta1 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE Project is proud to announce the first beta release of KDE 4.1. Beta 1 is aimed at testers, community members and enthusiasts in order to identify bugs and regressions, so that 4.1 can fully replace KDE 3 for end users.

Novell hopping with news, but it’s not all good

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.techtarget.com: Recently, Novell Inc. has been the beneficiary of generally good news. First, Microsoft gave Novell the nod to write open source extensions to its new System Center, which signals Microsoft’s move toward greater interoperability. This will benefit all open source vendors, but Novell in particular, because these extensions are built on Novell’s ZENworks management software. Score one for Novell.

your rough guide to plasma

Filed under
KDE

vizzzion.org: So I've chosen to become Shane's Personal Plasma Steward. This in turn makes me much more aware of things, that I personally take for granted which aren't so natural (yet) to others. One of those things is "How does this thing work?" (for "plasma" as value of thing). Let me explain on a high level how you can use Plasma and make the most of it, starting with a default Plasma desktop.

Sweeten your Vim with Cream

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: It’s an eternal debate amongst Penguinistas: Emacs or Vim? Unfortunately, for most” normal” (i.e., non-geek) folks, this debate will never occur, since they will find Emacs or Vim way too complicated, strange, and, well… different. There has to be some way to ease users into Vim, some way to leverage the power of Vim while accommodating, or even overcoming, the steep learning curve. Fortunately, there is a solution: Cream.

The Power of SystemRescueCD 1.0.3 - A Must Have Utility Disc

Filed under
Linux

reviewlinux.com: SystemRescueCD has been around for sometime and their latest version 1.0.3 just came out today. I take a short look at it and briefly describe some of its advantages. Checkout the short flash video at the end of the article to see SystemRescueCD 1.0.3 in action.

The Anatomy of a Crappy Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: All Linux distributions are not created equal. Some are superior in quality while others are so full of crap. I hate to sound grumpy like Béranger, but I have tried plenty of distros my entire life and have experienced using those that made my blood boil.

Why Linux Frightens Both the Software and Hardware Industry

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Today's closed source software vendors have a very neat, tidy arrangement that works well for them on both the Windows and OS X platforms. I will be exploring why I believe that the software and hardware industries fear widespread Linux adoption and what they will eventually have to do about it should things with desktop Linux come into fruition.

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Unable To Boot Lenovo Yoga 900 & 900; Is Microsoft At Fault?
    The popular device developer Lenovo has verified the claims that Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s unable to boot Linux OS but only Microsoft Windows 10. The new Lenovo convertible laptop, Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s, would reject and decline any attempt to install Linux operating system, making users turn their heads to Microsoft as the suspect for this issue. [...] This issue about the OS started when an identity of BaronHK posted on Reddit about installing Linux on the latest Lenovo Yoga book in which BaronHK encountered being blocked by a locked solid state drive (SSD) which Linux cannot define itself, and come up to link the issue to Microsoft.
  • How Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2 Performance Compares To Some Other Linux Distros
    The final Ubuntu 16.10 Beta for "Yakkety Yak" was released this week and we found its performance doesn't differ much from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (with the exception of the newer graphics stack) while here are some results comparing it to other modern Linux distributions. Tested for this quick, one-page-article comparison were Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2, Clear Linux 10660, Fedora 24, openSUSE Tumbleweed 20160927, and the Arch-based Antergos 16.9-Rolling release.
  • Qt 3D WIP branches
  • New Qt 3D Functionality Is Being Worked On
    Sean Harmer of KDAB is organizing work around some upcoming "major Qt 3D features" for the open-source toolkit. It's not known if the next round of Qt 3D features will be ready for the Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, but KDAB is looking to have these new branches for feature work with continuous integration coverage.
  • Cross-compiling WebKit2GTK+ for ARM
    Of course, I know for a fact that many people use local recipes to cross-compile WebKit2GTK+ for ARM (or simply build in the target machine, which usually takes a looong time), but those are usually ad-hoc things and hard to reproduce environments locally (or at least hard for me) and, even worse, often bound to downstream projects, so I thought it would be nice to try to have something tested with upstream WebKit2GTK+ and publish it on trac.webkit.org,
  • Should we drop Vala?
    Is it Vala development a waste of time? Is Vala suitable for long term support libraries?
  • SUSECON 2016: Where Technology Reigns Supreme [Ed: “Article Sponsor: SUSE”]
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/39
  • Free software activities in September 2016

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.6 Is Out with MIPS and OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Drivers
    Today, September 30, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the sixth maintenance update to the latest stable Linux 4.7 kernel series. Linux kernel 4.7.6 comes only five days after the release of the previous maintenance version, Linux kernel 4.7.5, and, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the last update, it changes a total of 76 files, with 539 insertions and 455 deletions. In summary, it updates multiple drivers, adds improvements to various filesystems and hardware architectures, and improves the networking stack.
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.23 LTS Has ARM and MIPS Improvements, Updated Filesystems, More
    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly informed the community about the general availability of the Linux 4.4.23 LTS kernel. The Linux 4.4 kernel is a long-term supported branch, the latest and most advanced one, used in many stable and reliable GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Alpine Linux 3.4. Therefore, it is imperative for it to receive regular updates that bring fixes to the most important issues, as well as other general improvements.
  • From NFS to LizardFS
    If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll know that we started our data servers out using NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit some load problems, switched to btrfs, hit load problems again, tried a hacky workaround, ran into problems, dropped DRBD for glusterfs, had a major disaster, switched back to NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit more load problems, and finally dropped DRBD for ZFS.
  • IBM's Ginni Rometty Tells Bankers Not To Rest On Their Digital Laurels
  • BUS1, The Successor To KDBUS, Formally Unveiled -- Aiming For Mainline Linux Kernel
    BUS1 has been in development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism building off the failed KDBUS project. An "RFC" will soon be sent out to Linux kernel developers about BUS1 and the subject will be discussed at next month's Kernel Summit. David Herrmann, one of the BUS1 developers, presented at this week's systemd.conf conference about the new capability-based IPC for Linux. He talked about how BUS1 is superior to KDBUS, how BUS1 is similar to Android's Binder, Chrome's Mojo, Solaris' Doors, and other common IPC implementations.
  • A New Wireless Daemon Is In Development To Potentially Replace wpa_supplicant
    In addition to the BUS1 presentation, also exciting from the systemd.conf 2016 conference is a thorough walkthrough of a new wireless daemon for Linux being developed by Intel's Open-Source Technology Center. Intel has been developing a new wireless daemon for Linux to potentially replace wpa_supplicant. This new daemon isn't yet public but the code repositories for it will be opened up in the next few weeks. This new daemon has improvements around persistency, WiFi management, reduced abstractions for different operating systems and legacy interfaces, and changes to operation. This daemon is designed to be very lightweight and work well for embedded Linux use-cases especially, including IoT applications.