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Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Jon Corbet's Linux Forecast, Netflix and More @LFCS srlinuxx 16/04/2013 - 9:30pm
Story Parallella: The $99 Linux supercomputer srlinuxx 1 16/04/2013 - 8:52am
Story openSUSE 12.3 review - Okay srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 10:39am
Story GNOME Photos 3.8.0 srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 10:36am
Story Raspberry Pi Tops 1 Million In Sales srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 10:34am
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 503 srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 10:18am
Story other weekend highlights: srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 2:49am
Story What makes a “lightweight” desktop environment lightweight? srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 2:43am
Story The Linux Setup - Meg Ford, GNOME Developer srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 1:06am
Story Best Download Managers For Linux srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 1:05am

Free/Open-source Television Software

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Watching live or recorded TV feeds using a desktop computer is made possible using television software. To those who are using Linux and are looking for some television software, then you are in luck. Here is a list.

Bits and pieces about Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: We are delivering our Spring Distro on time, i.e., on the very same day we had planned 6 months ago. It’s a great distro and we’re proud of it.

CrunchBang Linux 8.04.01 Released

Filed under
Linux

crunchbang.org: This is the third release of CrunchBang Linux. This release is based on the current development version of Ubuntu, "Hardy Heron". This release sees numerous improvements and when installed makes for a really usable, fast and attractive system.

Regressions with (X)ubuntu too

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger.org: I have been using Ubuntu 8.04 as Xubuntu since Alpha 5, which eventually pissed me off enough to drop it yesterday. When things that worked are breaking just 3 weeks before the release of a LTS... this is not "normal", or is it?

What you get for free

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: For good or for evil, a default Ubuntu Hardy command-line-plus-xorg system doesn’t leave you penniless and stranded. You actually get a fair smattering of clunky little programs that work just fine, but are ugly as sin and unlikely to make you happy — unless you’re working at around 100Mhz or so.

Is This the Start of Red Hat 2.0?

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: I must confess to a certain disappointment with Red Hat. On the one hand, it is clearly the leader of the open source world – both historically and in terms of its size. On the other, it is remarkable for the low profile it keeps.

Linux partisans gather at Foundation annual meeting

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch.com: How do you herd cats? Well, as the famous EDS commercial shows, it isn't easy. In a sense, that's what the Linux Foundation, the nonprofit pro-Linux organization, will be doing this week at the invitation-only LF Collaboration Summit at the University of Texas Super Computing Center here.

Unattended Fedora 8 Installation With NFS And Kickstart

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up an installation environment with kickstart and NFS on Fedora 8. With the resulting system you will be able run unattended Fedora 8 installations on the client systems in your LAN.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Mark Shuttleworth: Hammering on the Heron

  • Network Security Converges With Ubuntu Linux
  • Phonon with VLC and MPLayer
  • Three feed plugins for WordPress
  • LogFS, A Scalable Flash Filesystem
  • Is open source a vote getter?
  • Linux Wireless Morals
  • Smart cards provide hurdles, opportunities for Free Software

CLI Magic: Using GNOMEvfs to manipulate files

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: While KDE users get to boss KIO slaves for easier access to system and network resources, humble GNOME users can perform similar feats with its virtual file system, called GnomeVFS, which is an extension of the physical filesystem on a disk. Using GnomeVFS, users can work with non-local data that can come from unusual places, such as within compressed gzip archives.

OS Smackdown: Linux vs. Mac OS X vs. Windows Vista vs. Windows XP

Filed under
OS

computerworld.com: Since the dawn of time -- or, at least, the dawn of personal computers -- the holy wars over desktop operating systems have raged, with each faction proclaiming the unrivaled superiority of its chosen OS and the vile loathsomeness of all others.

Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring release warm up

Filed under
MDV

club.mandriva.com: The Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring release warm up programme has begun: 300 early seeders have been contacted and have started to seed the torrents. Be ready to download Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring in the very next days!

HP Mini-Note 2133

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

maximumpc.com: So, exactly how much do you sacrifice under the hood with a $750 subcompact? 1280x720 screen, full-size keyboard, and slick aluminum shell. We’ve spent the last few days testing the high-end, $750 model, which sports a 1.6GHz VIA CPU, 2GB of RAM, and a higher capacity battery. The operating system: you can choose between SuSe Linux or two flavors of Vista.

Zonbu Notebook Review: Part I

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

osweekly.com: When I first discovered that I going to receive a Beta testing review notebook from Zonbu, I was a bit skeptical. Despite being excited to try out one of their latest contraptions, I could not get my head around the challenges of a Linux notebook that was simple enough for the most casual PC user.

Ubuntu breathes new life into school's abandoned hardware

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworld.com.au: When 3Ghz dual core computers running 2GB of RAM weren't being used for many heavily CPU-intensive applications in a Victorian secondary school library, the school's IT department initially joked about replacing them with older and previously abandoned hardware. Then it saw the serious side.

Nine Improvements Needed in KDE

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: KDE 4 is a radical overhaul of the popular desktop. It offers broad improvements like the Oxygen desktop theme, SVG graphics, and enhanced speeds thanks to the latest version of the Qt 4 toolkit. It also offers specific improvements such as the font manager and the Dolphin file manager. In short, there's a lot to like.

Dell giving the shaft to open source ubuntu customers?

Filed under
Ubuntu

openswitch.org: First off, I should say that I like Dell computers. I’ve owned three Dell desktops and one Dell laptop. All have been of high quality and unlike some people, I actually think their customer service is very good. But recently I went to purchase a new desktop PC on which I am going to install ubuntu and saw some grim facts.

The state of open source: Eric S. Raymond, open source advocate

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Notorious open source advocate and author of The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Eric S. Raymond brings colorful acumen to any open source discussion. Here's how Raymond views the continually evolving open source landscape.

Microsoft Says OOXML Vote Was Fair

Filed under
Microsoft

informationweek.com: Microsoft said allegations that it improperly influenced the vote on a new standard for digital document creation are unfounded and arise mostly from individuals and companies unhappy with the vote's result.

Open source: Why we can't just give this stuff away

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Adrian Kingsley-Hughes has a great post over on Datamation entitled, "Linux...Why is it So Hard to Give It Away?". He addresses the difficulty in getting retailers to sell cheap Linux-based PCs, and decides that the problem is the support burden. Good points, but I'm more interested in the larger, underlying question:

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Virtualization 4

  • Red Hat’s gunning for VMware with virtualization platform update
    Open-source Linux vendor Red Hat Inc. has thrown in support for OpenStack Neutron and other new technologies with the latest release of its software virtualization package, in what looks like a bid to steal customers away from VMware Inc.’s more widely-used solution. Targeted at convergence, Red Hat Virtualization 4 is the first version of the platform that doesn’t include the word “enterprise,” in a move that suggests the company is hoping its virtualized stack will become the platform for convergence, rather than a server density product. OpenStack Neutron is the open-source networking project used by Software-Defined Networks (SDNs), which up until now has only been available as a preview. Many have criticized Neutron’s development for lagging behind the rest of OpenStack’s code base, and Red Hat was one of several vendors to concede that things could be sped up a bit. With the inclusion of the software in Red Hat Virtualization, the company says its Linux platform can be used to run both cloud-enabled and “traditional” workloads in concert.
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4 woos VMware faithful
    It's easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn't forgotten about you. RHV (Red Hat Virtualization) 4.0, released today, refreshes Red Hat's open source virtualization platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat's product line. It's a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat's virtualization efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company's intention to woo VMware customers.

NOAA Breaks Weather Apps, Slackware Updates, Valve @ 20

The LinuxCon headlines continue to dominate but, more importantly, our desktop weather apps are broken thanks to NOAA decommissioning the site. Liam Dawe looked back at 20 years of Valve and Sebastian "sebas" Kügler introduced new KDE kscreen-doctor. Slackware rolled out some updates including a rare kernel upgrade and The VAR Guy wants to hear about your first time. Read more

Android Leftovers

GNOME News

  • The future is here
    Nautilus from master, updated everyday, parallel installable, in less than 3 minutes. I cannot believe this is possible. Note that due to be sandboxed with no permission handling there are things that are not working, like opening with an application. For someone not aware of the whole platform and the Linux desktop, it’s difficult to see how many implications this bring to us and the changes that will allow in the upcoming months. This truly changes the game for GNOME (and any other desktop) as a project and platform, including 3rd party developers and companies using Linux desktops or that want to support it.
  • GUADEC’16 report
    I got a chance to attend GUADEC’16 which happened in Karlsruhe, Germany from 11 – 17 August. I stayed for the whole duration including Workshop Day, core days and the later BOF days which were very learning. I’m grateful to my mentor David Woodhouse who guided me all the time. I thank GNOME community for giving me the chance to speak at intern lightning talk and i tried my best to present my project in front of those great people. I hope to get a chance someday again to speak up. We have finished our GSoC project so i am free now to wander around to find some more places and tasks in GNOME’s huge shelter. My experience of attending GUADEC was awesome, despite being a less speaker i was very comfortable to talk and interact to people in the community. I made some new friends in the community and i came to know a lot more about it. I loved attending social events after the long day of great and motivating talks. I am thankful to the GUADEC organizers, i didn’t feel any problem for a second staying 6,000 kms away from home.
  • GUADEC 2016
    I came back from Karlsruhe last week, where GUADEC 2016 took place. It was a wonderful event. Even though it was only my second GUADEC, I felt at home in this community, meeting with old and new friends.
  • Summer Talks, PurpleEgg
    The topics were different but related: The Flock talk talked about how to make things better for a developer using Fedora Workstation as their development workstation, while the GUADEC talk was about the work we are doing to move Fedora to a model where the OS is immutable and separate from applications. A shared idea of the two talks is that your workstation is not your development environment environment. Installing development tools, language runtimes, and header files as part of your base operating system implies that every project you are developing wants the same development environment, and that simply is not the case.