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Saturday, 17 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Debian Squeeze Pre-review

Filed under
Linux

cannonblast.net: Every two years or so, Debian puts out a new "stable" release. This is my favorite distribution because of the minimal number of bugs and the huge software repositories and the powerful package manager.

Could Red Hat be Novell's spouse?

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

theregister.co.uk: Red Hat's CEO Jim Whitehurst declined to dismiss the possibility of buying out his company's Linux rival Novell in a meeting with reporters in London today.

Mandriva Linux is a fantastic scientific platform

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: Stéphane TELETCHEA is working in a french research laboratory. He is also contributing to Mandriva Linux as a tester and packager for some years now. Below is his testimony.

Mint 9

Filed under
Linux

bmc.com: Fedora 13's stay on my Dell D620 was short-lived. My first stop one evening was OpenSUSE 11.3 Milestone 6. Interesting things happening there, but not stable (nor advertised as such) so I decided it was time to go back to a favorite and see what was new. Mint 9.

What's the Worst That the FSF Could Have Done to Apple? Nothing.

Filed under
OSS

boycott-boycottnovell.com: In discussions on the implications of the recent FSF enforcement action against Apple's iTunes App Store, there's been a sort of recurring theme that's come up: what the GPL "requires" or "obligates" anyone to do. There's a strong strain of fantasy in these comments, and it's important to make clear what's actually the case here.

How Google Uses You

Filed under
Google

earthweb.com: Everybody knows that Google offers lots of free services. Many are ad-supported. Others aren't. They're just free products that we can all use as a kind of publicly provisioned resource. That's how most of us see Google. But guess what? That's how Google sees you, too.

Best Free and Open Source CRM Software

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: If you happen to own a business and are looking for CRM applications, I have here a list of some of the most well-known free and open-source customer relationship management (CRM) software available today:

Firefox Ditches the Dialog Box

Filed under
Moz/FF

webmonkey.com: Get ready to say goodbye to Firefox’s multitude of dialog boxes. Recent design mock-ups show Firefox moving toward an “in-content” look where settings, the add-on manager, themes and other “things which formerly appeared in dialog boxes” will now become just another tab in your browser.

Windows, Mac or Linux: Which is the most secure?

Filed under
Security

computerworlduk.com: Who's got the safest operating system? Apple, Google, Microsoft? According to one security expert, what really matters is who's using the OS.

Poulsbo still makes me sad

  • Poulsbo still makes me sad
  • Even With MeeGo, Poulsbo & Moorestown Are Crap

The Big Linux 2.6.35 Kernel Problem Is Fixed

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Using the 2 June kernel from the Ubuntu mainline PPA no longer causes a major performance hit and all of the test result values have returned to their levels prior to this kernel bug that lasted about one week.

Qubes - A Highly Secure OS Powered By Xen Hypervisor

Filed under
Linux

linuxhelp.blogspot: Qubes is an open source operating system based on Linux, which is designed to provide strong security for desktop computing. Its unique selling point is that all applications that are run on Qubes is sand-boxed from each other.

Washing the windows myths. Legal liability.

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

toolbox.com: Due to the fact that windows is produced by a single company and Linux is not then there is a target for any legal action which needs to be taken. With Linux there is no single target that legal action can be brought against for when things go wrong.

The BeOS file system: an OS geek retrospective

arstechnica.com: The Be operating system file system, known simply as BFS, is the file system for the Haiku, BeOS, and SkyOS operating systems. When it was created in the late '90s as part of the ill-fated BeOS project, BFS's ahead-of-its-time feature set immediately struck the fancy OS geeks.

MeeGo v1.0 for Netbooks Review

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: The tiny notebooks are usually best for those who just want to do the most basic of basics—Web browsing, e-mail, maybe IM—and not much else. In fact, were it not for the fact that Linux is a popular operating system of choice for them due to its nonexistent cost, they'd have almost no appeal to the DIYer whatsoever.

Peppermint OS – A New Take on the Web-Centric Desktop

Filed under
Linux

maketecheasier.com: early all operating systems these days seem to be transitioning toward a faster and more web-centric experience. Peppermint OS takes a different approach than Chrome and tries to blur the line between desktop and Internet.

3-Chip firms form venture to boost Linux push

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reuters.com: Electronic chip designer ARM has teamed up with five of its major partners to boost the use of free Linux software on cellphones, challenging Nokia's Symbian and Microsoft.

Linux Users vs. Linux Culture

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Using a forum board or IRC channel is a lot like trying to solve your problems by walking down a dorm room hallway. Room by room you poke your head in, say hi to everybody, and ask around quickly to see if anyone has an idea. The responses can vary depending on which door you knock on.

Learn Linux, 101: Create and change hard and symbolic links

Filed under
Linux

Learn how to create and manage hard and symbolic links to files on your Linux system. Explore the differences between hard and soft, or symbolic, links and the best ways to link to files, as opposed to copying files.

The Perfect Server - Fedora 13 x86_64 [ISPConfig 3]

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to prepare a Fedora 13 server (x86_64) for the installation of ISPConfig 3, and how to install ISPConfig 3. ISPConfig 3 is a webhosting control panel that allows you to configure the following services through a web browser: Apache web server, Postfix mail server, MySQL, BIND nameserver, PureFTPd, SpamAssassin, ClamAV, and many more.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record
    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.
  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots
    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users. SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.
  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian
    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.
  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started
    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.
  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier
    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory. The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.