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About Tux Machines

Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

some blogging shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • When Ubuntu tries to be Fedora

  • 24 hours with Fedora 9
  • Fedora 8 to 9
  • Upgrade to Fedora 9
  • Fedora 9: First Impressions
  • Harald Hoyer Appointed to Fedora Board
  • Linux Format Mega-Distro DVD
  • Ubuntu Distro for the Mini-Note: MinBuntu
  • AntiX saves the day
  • Mandriva

UN think tank urges legislators to support 'open source' information technologies, software

Filed under
OSS

firstscience.com: United Nations University-MERIT experts yesterday in Geneva urged parliamentarians to support open source software and information technologies as a way to let citizens participate meaningfully in the information society.

It's time to retire "ready for the desktop"

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Quite a few reviews of new Linux releases these days try to determine if a distribution is "ready for the desktop." I myself have probably been guilty of using that phrase, but I think it's time we officially retire this criterion.

25 Coolest and Funniest Tux Wallpapers

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: People just can't get enough of Tux, the world-renowned penguin mascot of Linux. I decided to give Tux lovers another treat by handing out my list of twenty coolest, funniest, and maybe cutest Tux wallpapers. So without any more delay, here they are:

Chapter 2: Project management and the GNU coding standards

Filed under
Software
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: In Chapter 1, I gave a brief overview of the Autotools and some of the resources that are currently available to help reduce the learning curve. In this chapter, we’re going to step back a little and examine project organization techniques that are applicable to all projects, not just those whose build system is managed by the Autotools.

gOS (Linux) Usability Review

Filed under
Linux

osweekly.com: As you might remember from my previous piece on gOS, some people have felt like the current gOS offering provided on Everex machines were simply not good enough for casual use. In this piece, I take it even further, with a full review on gOS' overall usability.

Firefox 3 RC 1 full review

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: A year and a half after the last major Firefox release, Firefox 3 Release Candidate 1 is here with a very long list of new features and improvements.

Also: 'Awesome Bar': Firefox's next killer feature?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • HOWTO: Passwordless Login using Gentoo’s Keychain

  • Keeping your SSH connections alive with autossh
  • Querying a database using open source voice control software
  • Really rough guide to ATI/FGLRX on openSUSE 11.0 Beta3 i586
  • Ignoring All Standard Characters Using Perl In Linux Or Unix
  • Installing Linux Without a CD: The Easy Process
  • FedEx using Drupal

  • Nice OpenSUSE Icons
  • Solving the famous “smart” case 2
  • Kernel hacker and Red Hat driver maintainer Jon Masters (video)
  • Nouveau Companion 39
  • OpenSSL Vulnerability Comic
  • A Linux Family Tragedy
  • How Open Is Microsoft?
  • Open Source in 2013

Comparison Between 5 Linux Web Browsers

Filed under
Software

50webs.org: The comparison includes the major five Linux browsers: Konqueror, Firefox, Opera, Epiphany and Galeon. I'm aware of others like Dillo or the older Mozilla, but decided to include only the big players at the moment.

Justifying Snort

Filed under
Software

techtarget.com: I believe the majority of objections to the value of Snort stem from the fact that it's called an intrusion detection system (IDS). Looking closely at that label, we should assume that an IDS is a "system" that "detects" "intrusions." Upon hearing this, IDS salespeople rushed back to their engineers with requirements for an "IDS" that "prevented intrusions."

Firefox 3 Release Candidate now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: The first Firefox 3 Release Candidate is now available for download. This milestone is focused on testing the core functionality provided by many new features and changes to the platform scheduled for Firefox 3.

Nothing New Under the Sun. Or Red Hat, or FSF, or OSI, or...

Filed under
OSS

Linux Today: Normally I find the missives from the 451 crew pretty insightful. But in Matthew Aslett's recent post, "Trouble in Paradise?" I find I have to take some exception. Matt. Dude. It was never paradise. Aslett raises the alarm that lately there has been a significant rise in animosity between the open source community the open source business vendors.

Fedora 9 makes Linux easy

Filed under
Linux

mybroadband.co.za: Six months after the release of Fedora 8, version 9 of the Linux operating system has been released. Fedora, the Red Hat-backed Linux version, is an easy to use system that makes even first-time Linux users feel at home.

Android vs. LiMo: What’s the difference?

Filed under
Linux

mobilecrunch.com: LiMo is Linux-based. Android is Linux-based. But they’re far from the same. Below, I’ll try to explain some of the key differences without going too heavy on the tech jargon.

Community-Powered Open Source Awards Just Got More Open

Filed under
OSS

money.cnn.com: SourceForge, the leader in community-driven media and e-commerce, today announced the opening of nominations for the third annual SourceForge.net Community Choice Awards. For the first time, all open source projects -- not just those on SourceForge.net -- are eligible.

Installing Ubuntu 8.04 on Virtual PC: It takes a village

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: I’ve played around with Linux a little on other’s machines, but I’ve never installed it myself or really tried to use it on a day-to-day basis. So, ready to take the plunge, I decided to install it in a virtual environment so that I could easily switch between it and all of my Windows-based tools and applications that I use for my editing duties. Keep in mind that I’m an editor (translation: English major), not a tech person, and will claim only a reasonable amount of tech savviness as a user.

Fedora 9: I'm not impressed

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: Fedora 9 was released earlier this week to great fanfare. There were the usual spate of 'ain't-it-wonderful' articles, extolling the virtues of this latest release (you know, the kind of pap I used to write about openSUSE and Ubuntu). So I said to myself said I, "I'll just download the Fedora 9 Gnome and KDE live CDs and see how they install." And so, I did.

Anonymous Web surfing with TorK

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: Everyone who surfs the Net is eminently trackable. Internet data packets include not only the actual data being sent, but also headers with routing information that is used to guide the packages to their destinations. If you want a higher level of anonymity, TorK can do the job. It uses The Onion Router (Tor) network to provide you with a safer way of browsing.

Five Reasons Red Hat Should Ignore Consumer Linux Desktops

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: Okay, it has been about a month since Red Hat said it had no plans to offer a consumer Linux release. Lots of folks went ballistic. The VAR Guy didn’t. Instead, he took some time to digest the news. And now he’s ready to say — definitively — that Red Hat made the right decision. Here are five reasons:

How can someone miss a meeting?

Filed under
Gentoo

flameeyes.eu: Well, shit happens people, and it seems like the extraordinary meeting that was supposedly scheduled yesterday night found Donnie and Wernfried (amne) alone in the channel. As people seems to either look at this as a sign of the council misbehaviour, or just as an escape route from an hostile council.

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Kernel Space/Linux