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Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Gaming Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:40am
Story Leftovers: KDE Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:38am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:34am
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:33am
Story Leftovers: Security Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:27am
Story UK Cabinet Office Says “Hello, You Must be Going” to ODF Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:24am
Story Manjaro Linux KDE 15.09 Gets a Fourth Release Candidate with KDE Plasma 5.4.1 Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:09am
Story New to Linux? You Should Start Right Here - Lesson One: Introduction to Linux Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:06am
Story Worried about Windows 10 privacy? Use Linux Rianne Schestowitz 21/09/2015 - 6:04am
Story Tizen 3.0 to Ship with Linux Kernel 4.1, Drops X for Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 20/09/2015 - 8:31pm

Dead Linux Desktop

Filed under
Software

Diaspora Has Security Holes? Duh

Filed under
Software

Squeeze in a jam?

Filed under
Linux

dontsurfinthenude.blogspot: Debian Lenny is a great operating system. It just seems to be completely reliable- if there are any bugs, I haven't found them. However, what's also obvious from the first time you use it is that a lot of the packages it contains are old.

Momonga Linux 7 review

Filed under
Linux

linuxbsdos.com: Momonga is a Linux distribution based on Fedora. It is a community-developed distribution with roots in Japan. Like Fedora, it is a multi-purpose distribution, a Free distribution, with a script that makes it easy to build and install non-free applications.

Fat or thin, it's your choice.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: People say that you can choose how fat or thin you are simply by combining a proper diet with regular exercise. For some reason it doesn't work for me. With Linux however, I do have a choice. It doesn't matter what distribution I use, I can configure my Linux installation to be as fat or thin as I like.

Firefox 4 Preview - Foxy, sharp and fast!

Filed under
Moz/FF

dedoimedo.com: Greetings, children of the Internets! Mozilla is about to unleash their fourth major release of Firefox, the highly popular web browser that has started the revolution and torn the supremacy away from Internet Explorer.

VMware is buying Novell

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.computerworld: My own sources have also now confirmed that VMware is Novell's suitor. Whether VMware will do a good job of taking care of SUSE Linux is another question.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • AMD Catalyst 10.9 For Linux Released
  • Open Source Tools for Video Editing
  • Most common SSH passwords revealed
  • Programming Lessons From Linux Geeks in the Trenches
  • Managing Open Source: New Tools and Techniques
  • Drupal 7.0 Alpha 7 released
  • Rafael Nadal using Drupal
  • The 1% Linux Market-Share Myth: Who Cares?!
  • In Search of the Perfect KDE4 Distro – Disqualifiers
  • Five Web Browsers: Which is the Fastest?
  • IE 9: A Chrome, Firefox Rip-Off?
  • UK Government favours 'flexible' open-source software
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 367
  • openSUSE: a distro that matters
  • Android: Opening A Pandora's Box of Licensing
  • Wesnoth 1.9 Brings Awesome New Features
  • FLOSS Manuals Continues to Deliver Great Documentation
  • openSUSE: Finding The Target
  • Don’t Confuse Standards with Open Source Software
  • GTK Impression – Making Sense of Metacity
  • Nautilus Review in Ubuntu 10.10 Beta
  • Romania to develop national open source IT policy
  • FLOSS Weekly 135: WebcamStudio
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 2 Episode 17

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 146: Ripping Apart a PDF
  • How to delete your Flash cache
  • Remove The Floppy Drive From Places Menu Ubuntu
  • build a tarball
  • Installing Linux Tip
  • 5 Steps to Install phpMyAdmin on Linux
  • How to wake up to music with Linux
  • OpenOffice.org: Interactions Between Programs
  • Using RAID and S.M.A.R.T to save yourself from data loss

Okular: Universal Document Viewer For KDE 4

Filed under
KDE
Software

maketecheasier.com: One of the new applications introduced with KDE 4 was Okular. KDE 3 had a PDF viewer named KPDF, but Okular aims to be a complete document viewing solution.

Microsoft Exec Says 'Open' Means 'Incompetent'

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

techdirt.com: Glyn Moody points us to the news that a Microsoft exec is criticizing the Brazilian government's support for open source software using some pretty weak arguments. This isn't new.

Kmart Smartbook now available

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Kmart Smartbook now available
  • It's a MID, a tablet, a netbook, even an external display!
  • Philippine government to make $75 tablet PC for schoolchildren

Novell’s Patents Are Complicating Its Sale

Filed under
SUSE

gigaom.com: After months on the auction block, Novell will be put out of its misery and sold within the next three weeks, according to credible sources. The only question is, why it has taken so long? The answer, according to a source close to the company, is patents. Big, juicy patents.

Canonical Announces Provisional Ubuntu Developer Summit Tracks

Filed under
Linux

LONDON, September 16, 2010 – Canonical Ltd., the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, unveiled the a list of provisional tracks for the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) scheduled for October 25-29, 2010 in Orlando, Florida.

Only design can save Linux

Filed under
Linux

silicoholic.com: Linux needs to be saved? Of course not, but: Linux adoption is often criticized because it’s not popular amongst the common users, anyway, most sysadmins will tell you that they’re using Linux on their servers. Linux (or Unix-like) servers are running very succesfully all around the world.

Ubuntu: It Just Works

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu: It Just Works
  • More on Canonical's Contributions
  • Ubuntu 10.10 moves towards completion

X.Org Looking For A New Logo

Filed under
Software
  • X.Org Is Looking For A New Logo
  • Recapping The New X.Org Development Process

Miro Review - Great Internet HD Video Player

Filed under
Reviews

Miro is a free, open-source video player with ports for Linux, Windows and Mac OS X, designed especially for watching HD videos. Miro bundles over 6000 Internet TV shows and video podcasts, and allows you to download each of them to your computer, so you can watch them without the need of an Internet connection.

PCLOS Mag KDE 4 SC Special Edition

Filed under
KDE
PCLOS

The NEW PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the KDE 4 SC Special Edition issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine. The KDE 4 SC Special Edition contains a collection of all of the KDE 4 articles we have ran over the past year, and can serve as a reference source for those who are transitioning to KDE 4. Included are:

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.