Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Napster: Ten years of change

Filed under
Misc

news.bbc.co.uk: In June 1999 a US teenager wrote a computer program that turned the music industry on its head, and created shockwaves that are still being felt by the global entertainment business a decade later.

10 KDE 4 desktop widgets to make you more productive

Filed under
KDE

blogs.techrepublic.com: KDE 4 brought some big changes to the desktop, including timesaving widgets that do everything from popping you into Twitter to keeping tabs on your servers to providing on-the-fly spell-checking. Jack Wallen runs through 10 of these handy little labor-saving apps.

Editing Videos With Kdenlive

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: For many years, editing digital video in Linux was not an easy task. Linux users have long sought a nonlinear video editing solution that was both powerful and easy to use. Kdenlive is the first video editor for KDE to combine both of these critical aspects into one package.

Five Essential Apps for the Ubuntu User

Filed under
Software

geeks.com: There's a lot of software for Ubuntu. A lot of it's good, some of it's OK, and there are a few duds. But the five applications that this TechTip covers are great additions to anyone's installation of Ubuntu.

5 Biggest Tech Letdowns

Filed under
Linux

connectedinternet.co.uk: It’s fun to look back in retrospect and remember the genesis of technologies that truly have become inseparable from our everyday lives. It’s even more fun to look back on the belly flops.

Macpup - Puppy on steroids

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Going through the almost endless repository of Puplets, I came across a little doggie called Macpup Foxy. It intrigued me, so I downloaded it and tried it - and very much liked it. So today, we're going to have a short review; nothing major. Call this a Puppy sequel, if you will.

Testing Out ATI Kernel Mode-Setting On Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Software

phoronix.com: Kernel mode-setting for Intel graphics hardware can already be found in the mainline Linux kernel and will be included by default in the release of Ubuntu 9.10 later this year.

Fedora 11 and Ext4: The Straight Bits

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

jaboutboul.blogspot: Fedora 11, when released tomorrow, will be the first distribution to boast the inclusion of ext4, the latest incarnation in the extended file system family, as default. Join me for an interview with Eric Sandeen, renown file system hacker.

Palm's Linux smartphone debuts

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: As promised, Palm's Linux-based smartphone went on sale Saturday, available exclusively for Sprint networks, says eWEEK. Early reviews have been favorable, although analysts worry about the lack of software and the ability of Sprint to effectively market the Palm Pre.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 306

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Absolute Linux 12.2.5

  • News: Fedora prepares to launch "Leonidas", openSUSE opens up development, Mandriva gathers ideas for 2010, CentOS publishes community magazine, Sun offers hints about Solaris 11, SliTaz 3.0 roadmap
  • Released last week: OpenSolaris 2009.06, Tiny Core Linux 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 11, Ubuntu 9.10 Alpha 2
  • New additions: Hymera Open, Qimo 4 Kids
  • New distributions: Digital Forensic Live CD, InfraLinux, StormOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Thank Apple for the Linux 'desktop'

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Matt Asay: I spent the weekend using Ubuntu 9.04 almost exclusively. Blame it on Apple. In 2002 I switched to the Mac and have never looked back. Which, I think, is why it has been so easy to pick up Ubuntu, Moblin, and other variants of Linux.

Introducing Gloss

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Taking a short break from his coding academy, Hudzilla has spent the last few weeks touring Italy and - believe it or not - fiddling around with Python. The first fruits of his effort are now available for world + dog to try, so if you're looking for something new to hack on, continue reading to hear from the man himself...

Wolvix Linux 2.0 Beta 2 Review

Filed under
Linux

extremetech.com: This week I decided to take a look at a lesser known distribution called Wolvix Linux. Wolvix is based on Slackware and, according to the Wolvix site, is geared toward the home user. But how well does it really work for home users?

6 best orthodox file managers for Linux

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: Depending on when you got started with computers, you've probably used an orthodox file manager. Go back to basics with these old-school file managers.

China's Censorware: What about GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

opendotdotdot.blogspot: News is breaking that the Chinese government will insist on censorware being shipped with all PCs:

ubuntu 9.04 review

Filed under
Ubuntu

sathyaphoenix.wordpress: Ever since jaunty released, I had cleared made up my mind not to try it out. I thought 6 months was too little time to spend with intrepid. But yesterday night, I installed jaunty.

Test-driving Chrome for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: With an alpha version of Google’s Chrome web browser recently released, I’ve been using it on Ubuntu for a few days. Below are some thoughts on the new browser and its ability to improve the Ubuntu experience.

Why Windows is not yet ready for the Desktop

Filed under
Microsoft

climbing-the-hill.blogspot: I don't spend my time telling other people which OS should or shouldn't suit their way of working. But it seems there are people who do. And it is thus that I find myself moved enough to mock their contribution to the state of public discourse.

Squeezing Lenny didn't make a lemon.

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: As you probably realised from my previous posts I like to put my Linux installations through their paces. In fact I am positively brutal with them. So I decided to do a distribution upgrade from Lenny.

No penguins in Akihibara

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Today in Tokyo, I set myself the task of finding Linux in the Akihibara, which advertises itself to the world as Tokyo’s electronic wonderland.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming