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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A Linux Desktop Designed for You Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 5:00am
Story Home automation hub runs Linux, offers cloud services Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 2:22am
Story Linux 3.17 Lands Memfd, A KDBUS Prerequisite Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:17am
Story LXQt 0.8 Is Being Released Soon Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:10am
Story About the use of linux for normal people Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 1:04am
Story Mesa 10.2.6 Has Plenty Of OpenGL Driver Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 12:53am
Story The Connected Car, Part 3: No Shortcuts to Security Rianne Schestowitz 20/08/2014 - 12:38am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:43pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:42pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:41pm

10 things you should look for in a netbook

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.techrepublic.com: When you’re evaluating netbooks, you have to weigh the convenience of their small form factor against a variety of limitations. Erik Eckel explains several key considerations that will help you find a suitable middle ground.

Nexuiz 2.5

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: So what are the big selling points of 2.5 from the player side of view? According to the changelog: New HUD, new weapons, new racing game mode, improved look & sound, better bots.

Do you need to worry about the new /dev/mem rootkit problem?

Filed under
Security

blog.ibeentoubuntu.com: A new paper was presented in late March about using /dev/mem to inject and hide a rootkit (PDF), and the method has been getting some press, leading to a little concern.

Lancelot and Raptor menu - the other way

Filed under
KDE
Software

polishlinux.org: Lancelot and Raptor are alternative menus intended for KDE 4. We are, however, at the frosty point, and we should ask ourselves the most important question here - which one to choose.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.30

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The next major Linux version will include new Wi-Fi drivers for chips from Atheros, Intel, Intersil/Prism and Marvell and new drivers for Intel LAN chips. The kernel will also in future make better use of energy saving features.

Linux Desktop in Peril

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: As I've written before, the Linux desktop in danger of extinction. If operating systems could be placed on the Endangered Species list, I'd lobby for it.

Health Check: openSUSE - Then and now

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: openSUSE 11.1, the latest community edition of Novell SUSE Linux, was released just in time for Christmas, to largely favourable reviews. openSUSE remains one of the market leaders, and features the latest and greatest stable releases of most of the important packages that make a classic GNU/Linux distribution, but it has had its troubles during recent years.

Ubuntu circus set to start again

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Six days from today, the Ubuntu circus will start all over again. The release of version 9.04 is scheduled for April 23 and lots of bandwidth will be consumed that day as people upgrade or else download the distribution for the first time.

Xen vs. KVM: The Linux Foundation’s Small-Minded View of Virtualization

windowsconnected.com: But the crux of the issue is really around why The Foundation chose KVM in the first place. It’s simple: KVM = Linux; Xen = Xen (that is, a purpose-built hypervisor derived from Linux). Second, KVM is not a true hypervisor.

Desktop Linux Needs A Bit More Organisation

Filed under
Linux

eweekeurope.co.uk: There are plenty of desktop Linux apps. The problem is finding, installing and managing them, says Jason Brooks. Linux vendors and communities could do a lot better.

“US copyright law is far too strict” – GNU founder

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

russiatoday.com: American software freedom activist Richard Stallman, better known as the author of GNU General Public License, joined RT to give his comments on modern software copyright laws, and the risks of cyber sneaking.

Also: Of RMS, Ethical Visions, and Copyright Law

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Manipulate Your Way to the Root of It

  • Derivatives of Ubuntu used for various applications
  • One of the Philippines Leading Retailers to Use Linux-based System
  • IBM passes open source license baton to Eclipse
  • The new Ubuntu Certified Professional course
  • Open-source server distro builds on Ubuntu
  • Open-source misperceptions live on
  • Day Planner 0.10
  • Will telcos embrace open source and what if they did?
  • Will the U.S. follow UK into the open source market?
  • Distributed Distribution Development, and Why Git
  • Big investments in open source
  • Is RMS Entering the Fray Again?
  • How to Kill a Linux/Unix System and Live to Tell the Tale
  • Connecting hobby and business in open source
  • Is Open Source Experience Overrated?
  • Tart, Funny, Smart, Insightful, Whiny: Linux Today Reader Comments
  • TomTom/Microsoft: A Wake-Up Call for GPLv3 Migration
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Release Candidate Is Here

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Teaching Programing Skills to Children with Logo

  • How to build aircrack-ng on openSUSE
  • Upgrading Multiple Debian Machines Quickly With approx
  • BleachBit to cleanup unwanted files on your openSUSE
  • View hidden files
  • prevent your SSH session from disconnecting in Linux
  • Dropbox on Ubuntu
  • Automate Your System Backup With Back In Time

Shuttle offer now Power-saving Nettop with SUSE Linux

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

hitechreview.com: Shuttle is now expanding its portfolio of Mini-PCs with Open Source operating systems. The latest offshoot is the X270V complete system based on the Shuttle Barebone X27D.

PC-BSD 7.1 Galileo Edition Review

Filed under
BSD

theitmassive.com: PC-BSD 7.1 is a desktop operating system aimed at the normal user and is based on FreeBSD. It enables fast installation of software and getting a working desktop running fast.

BBC iPlayer goes high definition

Filed under
Software

bbc.co.uk: The BBC's iPlayer is to start offering high definition (HD) streams and downloads of some programmes, and a cross-platform manager that will allow Windows, Mac, and Linux users to download BBC programmes, including those in HD.

NSW Government not giving away Linux vs MS details

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: The Government has been far from forthcoming when it comes to revealing any details behind the New South Wales (NSW) laptop tender choices. There are unanswered questions.

Introducing KDE 4 - Kontact: To-do (KOrganizer)

Filed under
KDE

introducingkde4.blogspot: This is going to be a small overview, since the "To-Do" is in fact part of KOrganizer, which was mostly seen on the last article. It's just going be fast view at the main interface, the changes to the interface remain the same as on Calendar.

Top 5 Media Center Programs for Linux

Filed under
Software

thelinuxcauldron.wordpress: I though I would share my thoughts on my exploits with the popular Media Center Solutions for Linux. While none of them are perfect some come very close.

Linux In Your Ear: Getting Louder, Or Softer?

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: Time to revise another assessment. It looks like it isn't going to be a question of "will your next phone run Linux?" but "which Linux is it?" Between Android branching out into set-top boxes and both Panasonic and NEC pulling the covers off new LiMo-driven phones (and Motorola also in that running), the mobile market's becoming a Linux market ...

Also: Panasonic, NEC unveil 9 Linux phones

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.