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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Touch OTA-9 Is Open for Business, Developers Can Start Pushing Fixes Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:26am
Story Mozilla Mobile Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2015 - 12:18am
Story Calculate Linux Scratch 15 KDE released Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 11:52pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 11:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 11:48pm
Story FCC: We aren’t banning DD-WRT on Wi-Fi routers Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 11:41pm
Story More Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 6:41pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 6:40pm
Story Ubuntu 15.10 Flavors : All New Features and Changes Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 6:33pm
Story XFS In Linux 4.4 Isn't Too Exciting Roy Schestowitz 12/11/2015 - 6:07pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Disable Direct Root Login to SSH on Ubuntu
  • Access ASCII table quickly using a single command
  • Fetching Files with wget
  • ProFTPd uploads fail to resume
  • Nautilus Side Pane(Sidebar)/Toolbar disappeared in Ubuntu 10.10
  • Using ‘Alias’ in Linux
  • How to Restore Missing Volume Control Icon/Button in Ubuntu

The Board 0.1.0

Filed under
Software

lucasr.org: Today I’m officially joining the GNOME Old Farts Club. I thought it would be a good time to make the first release of The Board. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you The Board 0.1.0!

Revenge of the Titans will go open-source at 1.75M

Filed under
Gaming

wolfire.com: Puppy Games just told us that they will release the source code for Revenge of the Titans if the Humble Indie Bundle reaches $1.75 million! We're already well past $1.5 million with two days to go, so this should be within reach.

A Xonotic Preview Release Comes For Christmas

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: In March of this year Nexuiz was forked as Xonotic following some disagreements among the Nexuiz developers and other contributors following the announcement of the Nexuiz commercial game. Since that point not too many details have emerged on Xonotic aside from it being said this new game would be a lot different. Well, the wait is now over.

Sabayon Christmas Gaming Edition is Here

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

ostatic.com: It's here. The long awaited Sabayon Christmas Gaming DVD is available for hours of enjoyment. Sabayon is a Gentoo-based binary distribution that's easy-to-use and comes complete with browser plugins, hardware drivers, and multimedia codecs that enhance usability. Now all that goodness comes wrapped up in a shiny new gaming package.

The 10 Coolest Open Source Applications Of 2010

Filed under
Software

crn.com: Here's a cross section of free, open-source applications released or significantly updated in 2010 that the CRN Test Center believes are among the year's best, either in terms of their usefulness to your customers or to you and your support staff.

Lesser known features in the latest Ubuntu Software Center

Filed under
Ubuntu

ghacks.net: The Ubuntu Software Center that we have now is not the same as the one that was originally released…and many users are unaware of some of its more efficient and productive tools. Let’s see if we can change that.

Firefox 4 Nearly Fully Baked

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcmag.com: For Mozilla's next browser version, let's hope eight is enough. The independent software foundation has just released Beta 8 of the heavily overhauled new version of Firefox.

Red Hat tantalizes with search for space

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat tantalizes with search for space
  • Oppenheimer Boosts Price Target on Red Hat to $55.00
  • Red Hat Upward Momentum Looks to Continue
  • U.S. Stocks Remain Slightly Higher; Red Hat Slides
  • What Makes Red Hat Tick?
  • From Red Hat to rPath: Erik Troan shares story of road from Linux to Windows

Why I Work on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

randall.executiv.es: There's been a lot of talk this year about two things. "Open Data" and "Open Web." These are seen as top priority projects by a lot of people, and I have been asked "Why don't you work on these?"

Rejoining Debian

Filed under
Linux

mdzlog.alcor.net: A couple of months ago, Debian project membership voted, after extensive discussion, to implement a fundamental change in the Debian community: to welcome as members people who make a valuable contribution to the project, even if they are contributing something other than source code.

Does 0 A.D. Signal a New Era in SaaS and Open-Source Gaming?

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

thevarguy.com: Traditionally, the computer gaming market has been among the niches least impacted by the open-source movement. But that could change dramatically if the developers behind the cross-platform, real-time strategy game 0 A.D. succeed in redefining the way games are created, marketed and distributed. Here’s why:

GnuCash 2.4.0 Accountng Software Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: GnuCash is one of the Linux desktop accounting packages for small businesses, but it's not the greatest; I am still an Intuit customer for their superior financial products. GnuCash 2.4.0 was released yesterday and sadly it really doesn't change the situation at all.

Open Invention Network in the Spotlight

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: Back in September, Mozilla made an announcement: This week Mozilla joined Open Invention Network as a licensee. At the time, I didn't pay much notice. Although I knew OIN, I wasn't particularly sanguine about its approach:

Mozilla denies Firefox 4 'do-not-track' privacy option

Filed under
Moz/FF

zdnet.co.uk: Firefox 4 will not include a 'do not track' privacy option to block targeted advertising, according to the web browser's maker Mozilla.

The Gift That Keeps On Giving - Your Time

Filed under
Linux
Software
OSS

linux-magazine.com: It is late, very late, and you are still trying to decide on a gift for your [loved one]. Why not give the gift that keeps on giving? The gift that most of these people will really appreciate, and that demonstrates the true meaning of the holiday season?

Kernel Log: coming in 2.6.37 (Part 4) – Architecture and infrastructure code

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The kernel now includes some components for supporting operation as a Xen host (Dom0). Switching into and out of sleep mode should be accelerated by the use of LZO compression.

4.6 RC 1 Available, KDE PIM Delayed

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: Right before Christmas, KDE has published the first candidate for the upcoming release of KDE Platform, Plasma and Applications 4.6. The focus at this stage is on fixing bugs and completing translations and artwork.

It's too hard is no excuse

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com: Linux is too hard. Linux is too different. Linux doesn't have this or that program. Linux is not compatible with x or y or z. Linux is blah blah blah....

Choosing Computer Tools for Tiny Geeks

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: For some children, it may be their two front teeth that sit atop this year's Christmas list. For others, however, it's items of a more technological sort.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.