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About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • RGBA support in Ubuntu
  • USB stick encryption using Linux
  • Password protect files and folders in Linux
  • Restore Broken Package DB on Sabayon
  • How to change your GRUB loader view using BURG
  • Installing R project for statistics in Fedora

A Look At The Latest Firefox 4.0 Design

Filed under
Moz/FF

ghacks.net: The Mozilla Firefox developers are working on several different branches of the web browser at the same time. The latest public version, Firefox 3.6.6 just released today, and Firefox 3.7 which will be renamed to Firefox 4.0 later this year.

Mandriva 2010 Spring ISOs coming

Filed under
MDV

Anne NICOLAS has announced on the Cooker mailing list that 2010 Spring isos should be available July 5, but will confirm Monday, June 28.

First RC for KDE SC 4.5 Ready to Go

Filed under
KDE

In the month since the second beta the KDE community has fixed hundreds of bugs. Development of features has been frozen for a while now and the Software Compilation is at the point where it needs a good testing to shake out the last issues.

Linux Games: Chromium B.S.U.

Filed under
Gaming

ghacks.net: It’s been a long time since I offered up a nice Linux game for the Ghacks audience. So I thought, today I will introduce them to one of my favorite Linux time killers Chromium B.S.U.

Is Fedora Going Through More Or Less Power?

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Along the same theme of yesterday's article entitled Is PowerTop Still Useful For Extending Your Battery Life? today here are some results showing the power consumption of the past three Fedora releases (11, 12, and 13) from a notebook computer.

What Did Microsoft Know About SCO's Plans and When Did It Know It?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

groklaw.net: When did Microsoft know about SCO's plan to attack Linux, and when did it know it? And was it a force behind it? We've long wondered. Certainly there have been indications that it was.

Generating Web Site Statistics With AWStats & JAWStats On Debian Lenny

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial explains how you can generate statistics for your web site with AWStats and JAWStats on a Debian Lenny web server. AWStats is a free powerful and featureful tool that generates advanced web server statistics. JAWStats runs in conjunction with AWStats and produces clear and informative charts, graphs and tables about your website visitors. AWStats is able to create graphical web pages for the statistics, but JAWStats presents this data in a much nicer way - it's much better organized and makes use of Ajax and Flash.

My first experience with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

benmccann.com: I just got a laptop loaded with Lucid Lynx and have had a bit of a mixed experience adjusting. I’ve actually used Ubuntu a bit in the past, but only minimally and never as my primary computer until now.

Windows SEVENNNNNN

Filed under
Microsoft

distrocheck.wordpress: So i’ve been using Windows 7 for a couple of months now, I was forced to do so for certain software. I have developed a wow/crap relationship with it.

Dissension, Mandriva, and other Observations

  • Dissension
  • Prufrock, Mandriva, and other Observations
  • Why Linux will (has?) hit a wall in popularity with normal users...

Meritocracy, Fate Or Anarchy

Filed under
OSS

monkeyiq.blogspot: Many folks on a higher pay grade than mine tout that open source thrives as a Meritocracy. In this model, folks who are interested enough create a project and release the source under GPL/Whatever and if the project is "good" or "gooder" than other ones it has more merit and will advance to become more widely used etc.

Distro Hoppin`: Peppermint OS

Filed under
Linux

itlure.com: Wow, gotta tell you, I have the best excuse for not spending more time with you, my awesome audience. The weirdest thing happened: as I was hoppin` around the Linuxland, I stumbled onto a springboard which threw me waaaaay up into the air, right in the middle of the cloudy cloudosphere.

Kernel Issues - The "Hurricane Katrina" of programming

Filed under
Linux

linux-magazine.com: Last week I spent two days that the Red Hat Summit in Boston. Unlike a lot of conferences I attend, I actually spent much of my time in technical talks listening to some of the things that Red Hat was going to be putting into RHEL 6.0.

full circle magazine issue #38!

Filed under
Ubuntu

In this issue, a review of Ubuntu 10.04, a new series on virtualization, and much, much more.

Firefox 3.6.6 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com: Today, we launched an update to our crash protection feature to extend the amount of time Firefox will wait before terminating unresponsive plugins.

Using the Mint Menu in Ubuntu 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

One of the features of Linux Mint is a replacement for the standard Gnome application menus. Linux Mint is actually based off Ubuntu, and it is fairly easy to add the MintMenu to your existing Ubunut 10.04 installation. This tutorial will show you how.

today's howtos & leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Finding out whether a script is piped
  • Ubuntu Notifications (osd-notify) Sucks, notifications-daemon Rocks – Exploiting the Goodness with Compiz
  • vtclock: One more console clock can’t hurt
  • sudo X applications on openSUSE
  • Awesome Compiz Skydome images
  • Going Linux 106
  • Pascal Terjan leaving Mandriva for Google
  • Is PowerTop Still Useful For Extending Your Battery Life?
  • Lojban software for Ubuntu
  • Find Which Package owns a File in Linux
  • Replacing OpenSSH server with dropbear
  • Red Eclipse
  • Google uses remote delete to remove Android apps from smartphones
  • GPL: The Google Public License
  • Remove Mono From Your Ubuntu Install

AWN vs Cairo Dock vs Docky

Filed under
Software

hackourlives.com: Mac style docks or launchers have become very popular among *nix users with the increase in popularity of Macs. And unlike Snow Leopard users there are quite a few free options for Linux.

On the Brokenness of File Locking

0pointer.de: It's amazing how far Linux has come without providing for proper file locking that works and is usable from userspace. A little overview why file locking is still in a very sad state:

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More in Tux Machines

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers