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About Tux Machines

Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story few headlines: srlinuxx 26/09/2013 - 9:50pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 26/09/2013 - 5:22pm
Story Are We Witnessing the Decline of Ubuntu? srlinuxx 25/09/2013 - 9:26pm
Story GNOME 3.10 is Here srlinuxx 25/09/2013 - 9:23pm
Story few headlines: srlinuxx 25/09/2013 - 6:36pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 25/09/2013 - 3:06pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 24/09/2013 - 2:56pm
Story more odds & ends: srlinuxx 24/09/2013 - 2:43am
Story Red Hat: Big bucks, big Linux srlinuxx 23/09/2013 - 11:46pm
Story Valve promises three announcements this week srlinuxx 23/09/2013 - 11:40pm

Linux based virtualisation – the way to save money and go green

itwire.com: Virtualisation is a technology that can work wonders: provide a testing environment, enhance your processing power, consolidate your computing resources, decrease running costs, preserve legacy apps and more! Here’s how virtualisation can benefit you and why the Linux route really beats out the competition.

Linux not essential to Eee PC success: ASUS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

apcmag.com: Penguin-powered mini notebooks are selling like hotcakes. But will they finally bring Linux into the mainstream? Don’t count on it.

Mandriva Linux 2009.0 First Impressions

Filed under
MDV

lxer.com: This is sort of a first impressions report on both Mandriva Linux 2009.0 Alpha 2 and a bit of a report on what I've discovered about KDE 4 (4.1). I'm currently running Mandriva Linux 2009.0 Live CD on a Virtual Box virtual machine on my laptop.

More proof that the revolution is under way

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Tonight I met a systems engineer for a European car company who spent 20 minutes talking my ear off about the virtues of Linux, and how much it had changed — for the better — since his college days.

Learning The Linux Lingo

Filed under
Linux

makeuseof.com: We here at Make Use Of try to make your switch to Linux as smooth as possible, which includes using simple and common terminology. However there are plenty of terms that are unavoidable or at least impractical to avoid. So here they are.

My 10 Favourite Free/Open Source Applications

Filed under
Software

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: IT is easy, if you are a Microsoft Windows user, to get tied-in to certain applications. But what about Linux and Free/Open Source users? Your own must-have applications will obviously depend on what you use your computers for. My own everyday needs are quite modest.

Thinking about career in Linux? Part 1

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: The other night, a good question popped out of my head — How many of the geek teenagers wish to work on closed source technology today? It’s been pretty ubiquitous for the computer freaks to turn to Linux/OSS. However, before changing gears, it’s necessary to know what’s needed.

New Triangular Tessalations for Compiz

Filed under
Software

kdubois.net: In addition to the being able to break the window into hexagonal and rectangular shapes, using my triangular tessellation code found in the extra-animations plugin, Compiz can now break up the window into triangular shapes.

Exaile — versatile audio player for GNOME

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: Exaile is a wonderful application for listening to music in a GNOME environment, although it could be considered a newcomer to the music player world. I have been using Exaile for quite a while now and I think it is the best application of its kind.

Xfe Review - Wonderful File Manager

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: The first impression Xfe gave me was of a solid, full-featured, powerful and good-looking file manager. I have to admit, I was really impressed by this application, and I've never used it before. But Xfe is a completely new and pleasant experience. Let me tell you what I've found so nice about it...

10 Awesome Linux T-shirts

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: I often find it necessary to express my inner geek side through my t-shirts. Be it in the form of my views about politics, computers, nature or just confusing tees that most people don’t know what they mean. So today I will share with you 10 of my favorite geeky linux inspired t-shirts that I own.

PCLinuxOS Magazine July 2008 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, July 2008 (Issue 23) is available to download. Some highlights include: Linux Media Players - Part 1, How to change your localization, and Chapter 4 - Kde User Guide.

Opera 9.5 - Now leaner and meaner!

Filed under
Software

techtree.com: Slick, fast, feature-rich, excellent security, not only a browser but also email client, rss reader, IRC chat client, newsgroup reader and bittorrent downloader, Os compatibility with various OSes, Linux and Mac OS. Opera is more than just a browser. It's a one-stop-Internet-shop.

The Simply Simple Mandriva 2008.1 Spring

Filed under
MDV

linuxtreat.blogspot: Mandriva Linux 2008.1 Spring have up-to-date version of the major components such as KDE 3.5.9(KDE 4.0.3 also available), GNOME 2.22, Compiz Fusion 0.7.2, OpenOffice.org 2.4.0, Linux Kernal 2.6.24.4. Mandriva support vast varieties of hardware, it automatically detects and configure most of the hardware.

Also: Mandriva Pludge: Following the 2009 Release

The Perfect Server - CentOS 5.2

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a CentOS 5.2 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and web hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc. This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of CentOS 5.2, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.

today's howtos & leftovers

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • Whoa!! Virtualbox needs kernel maintenance?

  • What New Users Need To Know About Ubuntu
  • Ask Linux.com: IT, Japanese, and crafting bigger and better bash scripts
  • rinetd - Internet TCP redirection server
  • How-To: encrypted partitions over LVM with LUKS
  • Extract and Compress Right Click Menu on KDE4
  • Getting Compiz Fusion on Fedora 9
  • Fedora 9, Skype for Linux 2.0x and the Microphone
  • AOL Voyager 105 Modem and PCLinuxOS 2007
  • PolicyKit Solutions with Ubuntu 8.04
  • Installing and uninstalling .deb package
  • Drupal Sourceforge 2008 award finalist

  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 07/04, 4th of July Edition
  • From the Middle English Phrase "God Be With Ye"
  • Why is Open Source/Community Developed Better?

People of openSUSE: Bryen Yunashko

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.org: Bryen Yunashko, a openSUSE member, is a recent acquisition to the openSUSE project who is involved in the openSUSE-GNOME and Marketing teams, coordinating the Helping Hands Project as also giving a hand at the accessibility of openSUSE.

Crummy Stats on the Gentoo 2008.0 release

Filed under
Gentoo

robbat2.livejournal: Ok, so this isn't a full one week period yet, but I'm going to be out tonight probably, so 8 hours ahead of time is close enough. This is just a quick scrape of the numbers.

More Unix And Linux Humor

Filed under
Humor

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: I'm putting some more funny stuff I've found while crusing the web, regarding our two favourite flavours of OS. Cheers, and enjoy!

Stop this GNOME 3.0 Tabs Stupidity!

Filed under
Software

i-nz.net: I really hope this GNOME 3.0 Tabs “mania” is a prank, because it just seems so, sooooo stupid. Really. It’s like flushing down the toilet all of the UI simplicity that GNOME is supposedly aiming for. Here is a mock-up.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.