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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why do you need license from Canonical to create derivatives? Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 10:08pm
Story The Dark Arch Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 10:02pm
Story 9-Way AMD Radeon Comparison On Ubuntu With Catalyst 14.1 Beta Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 9:48pm
Blog entry My Valentine Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 3:58pm
Story WebODF Making Good Progress, Aims For More Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 3:40pm
Story Everybody Can Submit Wallpapers For The Trusty Tahr Wallpaper Submision Contest Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 2:02pm
Story Microsoft-Bribed Ben Edelman Behind Latest Smear Against Android/Linux Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 10:31am
Story Distro Astro Is a Stunning Star Voyager Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 10:02am
Story Canonical Explains Why Linux Mint and All Other Distros Must Sign a License Agreement Rianne Schestowitz 2 15/02/2014 - 9:49am
Story Six Clicks: 2014's top Linux desktops Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2014 - 9:44am

Installing Linux apps: A few good tips

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HowTos Sooner or later, we all end up installing new software on our computers. Whether it's a new version of Firefox, or a cool game, or a video editing package, there comes a time when you want to make your system do more than it can do now.

Define “Contributions”

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Ubuntu In his opening keynote at the Linux Plumbers Conference in Portland, Greg Kroah-Hartman did so succinctly, if bluntly. His metric? Kernel contributions. Simple. Underneath all the rhetoric and the broadsides lies a real question: is Canonical a member in good standing of the Linux ecosystem?

power management goodness: kde 4.2 will suck less

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KDE As Dario has already blogged, we have a great new application in kdebase, scheduled to be released with KDE 4.2 in january. PowerDevil is actually not an application in the traditional sense. PowerDevil delivers the infrastructure for power management in KDE.

KDE 4.1.2 tagged, gentoo land frozen

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Gentoo On July 29th, KDE 4.1, the first almost usable KDE version since the 3.5 branch, has been released, and since then guess what happened in the gentoo-kde land? Nothing. Rumors are that developers have fought each others and the kde team is just no more.

The five best desktop Linuxes you haven't tried

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blogs.computerworld: One of the pleasures of Linux is that you can try out different distributions to see which one works best for you. You like Ubuntu, but you want to fine tune the desktop engine? OK, try Kubuntu with its KDE desktop then. Some worthwhile distributions, however, don't get as much attention as they deserve. So, here's my list of five great distributions that you might want to try.

Open source could fix e-voting flaws, California secretary of state says

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OSS California Secretary of State Debra Bowen argued Thursday that open source software can help fix some of the flaws in electronic voting systems, which have proliferated throughout the country since the 2000 election yet been criticized as unreliable.

Ubuntu 8.10 beta freeze now in effect

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Ubuntu We are now one week from the beta release of 8.10 and have just entered beta freeze.

Q & A with John Lilly, CEO of Mozilla Corp.

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Moz/FF John Lilly became chief executive of Mozilla Corp. in January, moving up from his role as chief operating officer. He's been with the company that created the open-source Firefox browser since 2005, the year Firefox 1.5 was released.

Fedora @5: How a Community Approach Works

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Linux Seeing the Fedora Project pass its five year milestone got me thinking about the early days of the community-based Linux distribution and how far it's come.

Gentoo 2008.1 Release Solutions

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Daniel Robbins: Gentoo seems to be having problems with .”1” releases – 2007.1 was cancelled and now 2008.1 has been cancelled. The Gentoo project has also announced a desire to move to a more “back to basics approach” where they are doing weekly builds of Gentoo stages. Good idea.

On-line applications "just work"; why worry about the freedom of the licence? An increasing number of computer users are turning to online applications instead of ones on their desktop. It started with webmail and has moved to productivity/office tools. With the emergence of online applications that have no desktop equivalent, and mobile devices that are browsers in your pocket, things are looking up. But what about free software?

Dabbling in OpenSolaris

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OS Recently, I have had the chance to dabble a bit in OpenSolaris while working on a particular server installation. OpenSolaris, as you may know, is the recently open-sourced version of Sun's Solaris OS, which in turn is one of the many flavours of Unix.

Trying Linux on your Windows system

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Linux A Windows user who wants to evaluate Linux, or any other alternative operating system, on their current system has a large number of options. In this article, we will look at those options for the busy Windows user who is evaluating Linux, wants to use open source applications, but doesn't want to lose access to their Windows system.

Do-it-yourself Konqueror commands

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HowTos KDE's Konqueror is as multifunctional as a Swiss Army knife. It works as both a file manager and a Web browser, and you can enhance it even further by adding new commands to its repertoire by means of service menus.

KOffice 2.0 Beta1 Released

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Software The KOffice team is proud to announce the first beta of KOffice 2.0. The goal of this release is to gather feedback from both users and developers on the new UI and underlying infrastructure. This will allow us to release a usable 2.0 release.

Ten easy ways to attract women to your free software project

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The gender inequality among developers and supporters of free software is stunning. Less than 2% of us are women, according to studies conducted for the European Commission. Why? The evidence says we’re driving them away. There are even some pretty good published guidelines on how not to drive them away. What’s missing is a practical implementation strategy: here I present ten relatively simple changes in how you run your project, to make it more attractive to would-be contributors—especially women.

Debian all business with Lenny and Squeeze

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Linux Steve McIntyre knew he faced a huge task when he took on the job of Debian project leader nearly six months ago. But he didn't reckon on the scandal of a major security bug, followed by a massive clear-up operation within a few days of taking over.

Interview: David Tosh of Elgg, The Open Source Social Networking Platform

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Interviews A little over a month ago, Elgg 1.0 was introduced to the world. In this newest release, several years in the making, the software has been improved from the inside out. We recently had the opportunity to follow up on our original interview with one of Elgg's founders, David Tosh. We talked about where Elgg stands today and what plans they have for the future.

Is Chrome a security risk?

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blogs.zdnet: An e-mail came in from her administrator around mid-day which she decided to share with me. It told all users to shut down Chrome. The e-mail called Chrome a security risk.

Also: Iron, a private version of Chromium from Germany

Adobe Talks Open Source, Innovation and the Future of Flash

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Interviews Kevin Lynch, CTO of Adobe talks with eWEEK about open-sourcing Flash, the new Adobe Creative Suite 4 (CS4), mobile technology and more. Lynch also talks of competing with Microsoft Silverlight and Expression and possibly with Google Chrome.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.