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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenStack Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 9:45pm
Story OSS Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 9:39pm
Story GNU/Linux in China and Gibraltar Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 9:17pm
Story Tizen Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 9:10pm
Story ​Turnkey Linux 14: Small business server Linux made easy Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 8:50pm
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of CentOS Linux 7 Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 8:48pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 8:38pm
Story LibreOffice 5.0 Is the Office Suite Champ Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 8:37pm
Story Universal Permissive License added to license list Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 8:33pm
Story Leftovers: Software Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2015 - 4:22pm

Custom PS3 operating system in the works

Filed under
Linux

afterdawn.com: A member of the PS3Hax forum has posted this weekend early screenshots of a custom PlayStation 3 operating system, one that can be installed if you have a jailbroken PS3 console.

Standard Ubuntu on the Netbook

Filed under
Ubuntu

amysramblings.wordpress: I’ve reinstalled standard Ubuntu on my netbook. Why?

Linux networking made easy

Filed under
HowTos

techradar.com: Ten years ago, most of us thought we would be able to live a full and happy life without worrying about whether we were getting maximum throughput across our networks, or whether the point-to-point latency on our machines would preclude us from popular gaming. But things have changed.

Krita - The KDE Answer to GIMP

Filed under
KDE
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: I remembered I only tried Krita once, in KDE 3, and I was a little dissatisfied with it (can't remember exactly why), so at the time I decided to stay with GIMP. This is why this article brought Krita again in my attention, so I decided to give it a spin and see how it looks like.

full circle magazine Issue 41

Filed under
Ubuntu

Issue #41 is out, and as usual, we’ve got lots of great stuff for you. We’ve got an overview of running Windows apps on Ubuntu, a feature on running a business with Ubuntu, more interviews, how-tos, and everything else in between!

The Defenders of Free Software

Filed under
OSS

nytimes.com: Mr. Hemel serves as a volunteer watchman for free, open-source software like the Linux operating system, which competes with Microsoft’s Windows.

few day's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Can an Application Store Succeed in a Free Operating System?
  • Digital Primer Video Available from the Xiph.Org Foundation
  • Behind KDE: David Faure
  • Running An Encrypted LVM In Ubuntu 10.10
  • FocusWriter 1.3.0 Released – Distraction free writing on Ubuntu
  • Create Your Own Online Backup Service With SparkleShare
  • Install DeadBeef-Ultimate Music Player in Ubuntu
  • Atlanta hopes to draw Red Hat away from N.C.
  • Linux Outlaws 166 - Narwhals in Your Head
  • VideoEgg acquires Movable Type blogging software
  • Open Source Community Welcomes Government Support
  • Linux Mint 10 to use Faenza icon set?
  • Pithos Melds Pandora Streaming with Linux Desktops
  • Loving Squeeze & Small Victories
  • Tomboy To Zim Wiki Conversion Script
  • nVidia - There is No Optimus Support for Linux
  • Clubbing baby seals is GPL-compatible: Why Oracle can do better
  • Popular webOS Feed Reader Goes Open Source
  • Linux Link Tech Show Sept 22
  • The Rise or Fall of Open Source?
  • Linux: Paradox of choice
  • New life for Mandriva
  • Oracle's invisible elephant
  • Open Source vs Proprietary Software – The never ending Battle
  • Keryx: Offline Package Installation made easy in Ubuntu
  • Five Rhythmbox extensions
  • With Six You Get Netware
  • Government wants to break free from Microsoft? – France shows you how.
  • PCLinuxOS vs. Ubuntu - or - Linux XXX vs. Linux YYY
  • 5 Reasons to Wrap Your Enterprise in Python
  • Are We Entering the Golden Age of Forks?
  • FLOSS Weekly 136: Emacs Org-Mode

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Anatomy of an exploit: CVE-2010-3081
  • Quick Way to upgrade to Ubuntu 10.10
  • Listen to Text and Instant Messages with Gespeaker
  • How to read Ext3/Ext4 linux partition from windows 7
  • Merge, split, and watermark your PDFs with PDF Chain
  • How to Backup Your Linux PC with Simple Backup
  • Understanding and modifying file permissions using chmod
  • Free Up Disk Space in Ubuntu by Deleting Cached Packages
  • Changing Mouse Sensitivity from the Command Line
  • Ratpoison and dmenu
  • How to set Shell Environment Variables (bash shell)?
  • Hidden Linux: Sensing temperature
  • Free-form note taking with Xournal
  • Turn a Pogoplug into a Fully-Featured Linux Web Server
  • Install Create Background Slideshow (CreBS) On Ubuntu 10.10
  • NTOP for Network Analysis
  • Building a Security Audit Toolkit
  • Retrieve mail from Yahoo!'s webmail service - FetchYahoo
  • Zeya- Streaming music server using HTML 5 | Ubuntu
  • Restore suspend function in Xfce Xubuntu 10.10
  • Writing Better Shell Scripts – Part 3, Part 2, Part 1
  • File Associations With Different Applications for KDE

User Riots: What Does Not Work with Launcher Menus (Part 2)

Filed under
SUSE

Various stats suggest that 85% of people are right handed. These could also be interpreted as the majority of people using computers are right handed as well. The majority of Launcher menus sit on the bottom left of the screen.

Lightspark's Advanced Graphics Engine Progresses

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: For those interested in the state of the "advanced graphics engine" for Lightspark, the newest and promising open-source project to implement support for Adobe's Flash/SWF specification, there's an update.

Bye bye Suse, welcome Fedora

Filed under
Linux
SUSE

blog.delouw.ch: After using SuSE and later OpenSuse since 1994 it was time for a change. I was stuck at OpenSuse because of its excellent multimedia support trough 3rd party repostitories from packman. Last evening another update brought the system down once again. Time for change.

Top 12 PC Games Of All Time

Filed under
Gaming

informationweek.com: With a click of the mouse, gamers can transport themselves into futuristic worlds, realistic battle scenes and a virtual life of organized crime. Although there they face extensive competition from console-makers such as Nintendo and Sony, PC software games continue to flourish, as each year hundreds of titles vie for consumers' attention, loyalty and dollars. Here's a dozen of the all time best.

Amarok 2.3.2 Raises The Bar On Linux Media Players

Filed under
Software

thebluemint.net: A heads up, for those who haven't heard: the venerable flagship media player Amarok has released a new version upon the masses. 2.3.2, Codenamed "Moonshine", includes a series of bug fixes along with some cool new features as well.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 142 is out!

Filed under
SUSE

Developers fork Mandriva Linux - Welcome Mageia

Filed under
MDV

linuxjournal.com: Everyone knows Mandriva Linux is in trouble. At best the desktop version is being starved into oblivion and many expect the company to disappear completely. The exodus of developers has been recorded over the last few months...

Linux-based signal processing system from Spectrum Signal Processing

Filed under
Linux

militaryaerospace.com: Engineers at Spectrum Signal Processing by Vecima (TSX:VCM) in Burnaby, British Columbia showcased their Linux-based signal processing platform -- the SDR-2010 at the Embedded Systems Conference in Boston.

Lost Luggage Studios "Anirah" Mac and Linux Versions Released

Filed under
Gaming

pr.com: Newest version of "Anirah: Riddle of the Pharaohs," a MahJongg-like math-based puzzle game, now runs on Mac, Linux, and Windows 7 for both 32-bit and 64-bit systems.

UNetbootin - Bootable USB Media Made Easy

Filed under
Linux
Software

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: I think that one of the most useful developments of the past couple of years has been bootable USB sticks. Not just "LiveUSB" sticks, from which you can actually run Linux, although those are wonderful too, but just plain old bootable distribution installers.

Memo From Novell to Oracle: No Oracle Linux Needed

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: Call it an open letter from Novell to Oracle and the broader Linux industry. In a blog post, Novell Director of Linux Appliances Michael Applebaum says the world “doesn’t need a third Linux distro.”

Organizing photos with jBrout

Filed under
Software

scottnesbitt.net: Lately, I’ve been looking at a number of tools for organizing my photos. It’s not that I have a lot of photos. I’m just trying to find a minimal yet useful app to help me organize my photos.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

  • How to video conference without people hating you
    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.
  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event
    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week. Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.
  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1
    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania. The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018. A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.
  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper
    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more