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Thursday, 29 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Meet the Steamboxes (Gallery) Roy Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 5:19pm
Story 4 reasons companies say yes to open source Roy Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 4:41pm
Story CentOS Project joins forces with Red Hat Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 1:19pm
Story The Latest Benchmarks Of The Linux 3.13 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 11:28am
Story New Harman IVI system runs HTML5 apps on Linux Roy Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 11:13am
Story SteamOS Update Now Officially Supports Intel Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 12:14am
Story Here are Valve's 14 Steam Machines partners (so far) Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 11:44pm
Story SteamOS Didn't Use Ubuntu Over Legal Issues Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 10:15pm
Story Meet the Open Source Trio Primed to Topple Oracle Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 8:57pm
Story Valve announces over more than a dozen Linux-powered Steam gaming boxes Rianne Schestowitz 07/01/2014 - 8:51pm

openSUSE Election Committee Founded

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: We now have founded an openSUSE Election Committee. The openSUSE election committee will organize and oversee the first openSUSE Board election, the board has authorized it to decide any open questions on the elections.

DRM Patches For Linux 2.6.27 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: While the merge window for the Linux 2.6.27 kernel has already closed, we will hopefully see a few more Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) patches.

Red Hat fesses up to Fedora FOSS security fiasco

Filed under
Linux
Security

itwire.com: A week or so ago, end users of the Linux-based Red Hat Fedora OS were warned to avoid downloading packages due to an "issue in the infrastructure systems" which waved big red flags suggesting a security breach to many industry observers.

25 killer Linux apps

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: We all know that Linux is about choice. Everyone has the choice of what they use and how they use it. A consequence of this is that there's a huge range of software out there. We'll highlight some of the choices available to you for some of the most common desktop tasks.

Review: Kubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

Filed under
Ubuntu

headshotgamer.com: I'm going to look at Kubuntu 8.10 Alpha 4, an often overlooked distribution due to Ubuntu stealing most of the limelight (and don't forget Xubuntu, which stands in the shadow of both Ubuntu and Kubuntu).

ext3 with data=journal results

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I’ve been toying with a minimal Ubuntu installation identical to the one I built for the Hardy speed guide, but this time I used data=journal as a flag for the default ext3 filesystem.

PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME - Beauty Meets Beast

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: I have long been performance-hungry, and I don't mind spending hours in tinkering my desktop/laptop for maximum speed and performance. During my long 15 years of tweaking and tinkering I found PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME to be the best, because it has already been tweaked and tested for me.

Downgrade to XP or Upgrade to Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

lazytechguy.com: My friend wanted a low cost Laptop and went for Dell 1525. Here in Singapore, it is really a value for money Notebook. Everything is OK with this Laptop, just one issue- It has Vista Basic. We discussed his problem and came with two possible alternatives:

odds & ends (leftovers)

Filed under
News
  • The Hacker Test: More Linux and Unix Humor

  • Docunification
  • Freezy Linux is a free, easy-to-use Linux-based operating system
  • Zimbra Adds Support for Ubuntu 8.04
  • The Origins of Linux - Linus Torvalds

IS Ubuntu Hardy really THAT buggy ?

Filed under
Ubuntu

lazytechguy.com: Blogsphere and forums are full of post saying that hardy is much more buggy than Gutsy or any other previous release. Come on this is a LTS release, how can this be so buggy ? Lets take a look at some of the posts

and a few more

Filed under
HowTos
  • Short Tip: Compare revisions with SVN

  • How to split screen your command line
  • Installing and Running sendmail in Red Hat Linux
  • How I repaired a corrupted grub menu.lst config file
  • Using more than 4 GB RAM on Debian etch 32bit

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Enable extra compiz fusion effects in Mandriva Linux

  • Compile the Kernel on Debian etch
  • Blackberry tethering in Mandriva with barry-ppp

An Inside look at Debian -- Chatting with DPL Steve McIntyre

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

blogs.sun.com: Down in Argentina I grabbed some time with Steve McIntyre, Debian's 11th project leader since its founding 15 years ago. Steve has been on the job since April of this year and I checked in to see how it was going.

Fedora vs. Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

snemir.blogspot: With a short break between the classes, I decided to try to install Ubuntu and Fedora Core 9 on my laptop to compare the two...

Top Five Linux Distros

Filed under
Linux

techbrave.com: Lots of distributions, of course using Linux is nightmare for the windows users and selecting the right distribution is a much greater nightmare, thousands of distros to choose from. And the best way is to look for the distribution that suits you the most. Here are some of the top linux distros.

What is Top 10 of Ubuntu-based Linux Distributions

Filed under
Ubuntu

techgyaan.org: I want to know what is the top 10 of Ubuntu-based Linux Distributions shown in the following list. VnTutor Blog help me really to explore Ubuntu World. Heads up to VnTutor

AntiX 7.5 is Now Available

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: Anti and MEPIS announce the release of antiX MEPIS 7.5, "Toussaint Louverture." New features based on community contributions are led by the antiX Control Centre, which provides a single handy place for managing desktop, system, network, and hardware.

5 Least Popular Desktop Environments for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: KDE, GNOME, and Xfce are without doubt the most well-known desktop environments for Linux at the moment. They are utilized by majority of Linux Distributions simply because they are very much stable and usable. But did you know that there are other capable Free and Open-source desktop environments that you probably haven’t heard of?

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Learning Linux Chmod Using Numbers

  • Linux - Getting the Correct Time
  • BASH: Prepend A Text / Lines To a File
  • How to set Virtual Box in Full screen Mode?
  • Optimizing the Ubuntu Boot Process

few bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Mint Linux, working straight out of the box

  • Ubuntu 8.04.1 on my Aspire One
  • Ubuntu On My Macbook
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • But is it safe? Uncork a bottle of vintage open-source FUD
    Most of the open source questioners come from larger organisations. Banks very rarely pop up here, and governments have long been hip to using open source. Both have ancient, proprietary systems in place here and there that are finally crumbling to dust and need replacing fast. Their concerns are more oft around risk management and picking the right projects. It’s usually organisations whose business is dealing with actual three dimensional objects that ask about open source. Manufacturing, industrials, oil and gas, mining, and others who have typically looked at IT as, at best, a helper for their business rather than a core product enabler. These industries are witnessing the lighting fast injection of software into their products - that whole “Internet of Things” jag we keep hearing about. Companies here are being forced to look at both using open source in their products and shipping open source as part of their business. The technical and pricing requirements for IoT scale software is a perfect fit for open source, especially that pricing bit. On the other end - peddling open source themselves - companies that are looking to build and sell software-driven “platforms” are finding that partners and developers are not so keen to join closed source ecosystems. These two pulls create some weird clunking in the heads of management at these companies who aren’t used to working with a sandles and rainbow frame of mind. They have a scepticism born of their inexperience with open source. Let’s address some of their trepidation.
  • Real business innovation begins with open practices
    To business leaders, "open source" often sounds too altruistic—and altruism is in short supply on the average balance sheet. But using and contributing to open source makes hard-nosed business sense, particularly as a way of increasing innovation. Today's firms all face increased competition and dynamic markets. Yesterday's big bang can easily become today's cautionary tale. Strategically, the only viable response to this disruption is constantly striving to serve customers better through sustained and continuous innovation. But delivering innovation is hard; the key is to embrace open and collaborative innovation across organizational walls—open innovation. Open source communities' values and practices generate open innovation, and working in open source is a practical, pragmatic way of delivering innovation. To avoid the all-too-real risk of buzzword bingo we can consider two definitions of "innovation": creating value (that serves customer needs) to sell for a profit; or reducing what a firm pays for services.
  • This Week In Servo 79
    In the last week, we landed 96 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories. Promise support has arrived in Servo, thanks to hard work by jdm, dati91, and mmatyas! This does not fully implement microtasks, but unblocks the uses of Promises in many places (e.g., the WebBluetooth test suite). Emilio rewrote the bindings generation code for rust-bindgen, dramatically improving the flow of the code and output generated when producing Rust bindings for C and C++ code. The TPAC WebBluetooth standards meeting talked a bit about the great progress by the team at the University of Szeged in the context of Servo.
  • Servo Web Engine Now Supports Promises, Continues Churning Along
    It's been nearly two months since last writing about Mozilla's Servo web layout engine (in early August, back when WebRender2 landed) but development has kept up and they continue enabling more features for this next-generation alternative to Gecko. The latest is that Servo now supports JavaScript promises. If you are unfamiliar with the promise support, see this guide. The latest Servo code has improvements around its Rust binding generator for C and C++ code plus other changes.
  • Riak TS for time series analysis at scale
    Until recently, doing time series analysis at scale was expensive and almost exclusively the domain of large enterprises. What made time series a hard and expensive problem to tackle? Until the advent of the NoSQL database, scaling up to meet increasing velocity and volumes of data generally meant scaling hardware vertically by adding CPUs, memory, or additional hard drives. When combined with database licensing models that charged per processor core, the cost of scaling was simply out of reach for most. Fortunately, the open source community is democratising large scale data analysis rapidly, and I am lucky enough to work at a company making contributions in this space. In my talk at All Things Open this year, I'll introduce Riak TS, a key-value database optimized to store and retrieve time series data for massive data sets, and demonstrate how to use it in conjunction with three other open source tools—Python, Pandas, and Jupyter—to build a completely open source time series analysis platform. And it doesn't take all that long.
  • Free Software Directory meeting recap for September 23rd, 2016

Security News

  • security things in Linux v4.5
  • Time to Kill Security Questions—or Answer Them With Lies
    The notion of using robust, random passwords has become all but mainstream—by now anyone with an inkling of security sense knows that “password1” and “1234567” aren’t doing them any favors. But even as password security improves, there’s something even more problematic that underlies them: security questions. Last week Yahoo revealed that it had been massively hacked, with at least 500 million of its users’ data compromised by state sponsored intruders. And included in the company’s list of breached data weren’t just the usual hashed passwords and email addresses, but the security questions and answers that victims had chosen as a backup means of resetting their passwords—supposedly secret information like your favorite place to vacation or the street you grew up on. Yahoo’s data debacle highlights how those innocuous-seeming questions remain a weak link in our online authentication systems. Ask the security community about security questions, and they’ll tell you that they should be abolished—and that until they are, you should never answer them honestly. From their dangerous guessability to the difficulty of changing them after a major breach like Yahoo’s, security questions have proven to be deeply inadequate as contingency mechanisms for passwords. They’re meant to be a reliable last-ditch recovery feature: Even if you forget a complicated password, the thinking goes, you won’t forget your mother’s maiden name or the city you were born in. But by relying on factual data that was never meant to be kept secret in the first place—web and social media searches can often reveal where someone grew up or what the make of their first car was—the approach puts accounts at risk. And since your first pet’s name never changes, your answers to security questions can be instantly compromised across many digital services if they are revealed through digital snooping or a data breach.
  • LibreSSL and the latest OpenSSL security advisory
    Just a quick note that LibreSSL is not impacted by either of the issues mentioned in the latest OpenSSL security advisory - both of the issues exist in code that was added to OpenSSL in the last release, which is not present in LibreSSL.
  • Record-breaking DDoS reportedly delivered by >145k hacked cameras
    Last week, security news site KrebsOnSecurity went dark for more than 24 hours following what was believed to be a record 620 gigabit-per-second denial of service attack brought on by an ensemble of routers, security cameras, or other so-called Internet of Things devices. Now, there's word of a similar attack on a French Web host that peaked at a staggering 1.1 terabits per second, more than 60 percent bigger. The attacks were first reported on September 19 by Octave Klaba, the founder and CTO of OVH. The first one reached 1.1 Tbps while a follow-on was 901 Gbps. Then, last Friday, he reported more attacks that were in the same almost incomprehensible range. He said the distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks were delivered through a collection of hacked Internet-connected cameras and digital video recorders. With each one having the ability to bombard targets with 1 Mbps to 30 Mbps, he estimated the botnet had a capacity of 1.5 Tbps. On Monday, Klaba reported that more than 6,800 new cameras had joined the botnet and said further that over the previous 48 hours the hosting service was subjected to dozens of attacks, some ranging from 100 Gbps to 800 Gbps. On Wednesday, he said more than 15,000 new devices had participated in attacks over the past 48 hours.

Android Leftovers

GNU/Linux/FOSS Events

  • PyCon 2016
    I come from a place where everyone worships competitive coding and thus cpp, so the experience of attending my first pycon was much awaited for me. This year’s PyCon India happened in Delhi and i along with a couple of my friends reached on 23rd September, the first day. We were a bit late but it was all right because, we didn’t miss anything.
  • What do you have to say? Share it at LibrePlanet 2017
  • LibrePlanet returns March 25-26, 2017, call for proposals for annual free software conference now open
    LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts. The conference brings together software developers, policy experts, activists and computer users to learn skills, share accomplishments and face challenges to software freedom. Newcomers are always welcome, and LibrePlanet 2017 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels. This year, the theme of LibrePlanet is "The Roots of Freedom." This encompasses the historical "roots" of the free software movement -- the Four Freedoms, the GNU General Public License and copyleft, and a focus on strong security and privacy protections -- and the concept of roots as a strong foundation from which the movement grows. "LibrePlanet is an impactful, exciting free software conference. Attendance has grown each year, yet the community-minded atmosphere has grown even stronger," said John Sullivan, executive director of the FSF.
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Session Lineup for MesosCon Asia
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the schedule for MesosCon Asia, taking place November 18-19 in Hangzhou, China.