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Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Five things to like About Debian 7.0 'Wheezy' srlinuxx 08/05/2013 - 5:03am
Story To the space station and beyond with Linux srlinuxx 1 07/05/2013 - 11:54pm
Story Best Linux photo editors srlinuxx 07/05/2013 - 8:45pm
Story Red Hat CEO: We don't need Microsoft to succeed srlinuxx 07/05/2013 - 8:34pm
Story Linux still "benchmark of quality" in this year's Coverity Scan srlinuxx 07/05/2013 - 8:32pm
Story 5 Linux Distributions With Fastest Boot Speeds srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:31pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 506 srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:29pm
Story Debian 7.0 is Finally Here srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:27pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 06/05/2013 - 4:59am
Blog entry Ubuntu 13.04 raring to go on Acer C7 Chromebook fieldyweb 04/05/2013 - 2:49pm

Litrix 8.5 | Brazilian Desktop GNU/Linux Distribution for Home Users

Filed under
Linux

saleem-khan.blogspot: Litrix 8.5 - International edition was released on Tuesday, 20 May 2008 and is available for download as a single Live DVD of 1.2 GB from the Litrix Linux Home Page. I never had a chance to try the previous versions partly because the English language support was not available by default and partly because it is based on the "scary" Gentoo Linux which looks threatening to home users because of its manual configuration.

Myah OS 3.0 Mouse Pro Released

Filed under
Linux

The long awaited Myah OS 3.0 is here. 3.0 has been in development since 2006 right after the release of version 2.3. Being completely development from the source up has been quite an undertaking. The initial release is the flagship of the Myah OS range dubbed Mouse Pro. This name is due to the fact that it's built around the XFCE 4.4 desktop, and comes with a complete development environment.

4.1 times more Prettyness

Filed under
KDE

Ladies and gentlemen, let me introduce you the brand new shiny Plasma theme that will be used for KDE 4.1. Here you can see the new applet and krunner backgrounds, the new panel, our brand-new carbon fiber clock and some items that once upon a time weren't themed at all, like the pager and the taskbar.

Small PCs big news as economy slows

Filed under
Hardware

reuters.com: Smaller, low-cost PCs are likely to be at the top of the shopping list for technology buyers gathering in Taipei this week for the world's second largest computer fair, as an economic slowdown in the United States forces consumers to cut back on spending.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • UBUNTU Studio Revisited

  • SaxenOS 2008 beta 2 Final Report
  • Going Ubuntu
  • Fedora 9
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 Beta and Extensions Show Strong Momentum (PR)
  • The Palm Size Linux Server
  • Cute Lil’ Classmate
  • Is this the cheapest Linux laptop on the planet?
  • The latest in Novell Linux certifications
  • “make” is annoying
  • Get Used to the Command Line in Linux, Part 3

How To Back Up Your Files With Areca On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

Areca is a personal file backup software developed in Java. It allows you to select files or directories to back up, filter, encrypt and compress their content, and store them on your backup location. Areca supports incremental backups and generates backup reports, which can be stored on your disk or sent by email. This guide explains how to install and use it on a Fedora 9 desktop (GNOME).

Linux Outlaws 40 - Software Freedom, Lawsuits & Poker

Filed under
OSS

linuxoutlaws.com: In this special episode, we talk to Bradley M. Kuhn of the FSLC & FSC about software freedom, litigation against open source developers, the future and thread of web services that aren’t open, the AGPL and poker.

Compiz and Compiz Fusion 0.7.6 out in wild

Filed under
Software

compiz-fusion.org/~cyberorg: Our friends Dennis Kasprzyk and Guillaume Seguin announced the release of Compiz and Compiz Fusion 0.7.6 respectively. As is the tradition we always make a release with a lot of new features and of course eye-candy to go with it.

Are your Firefox extensions proprietary software?

Filed under
Moz/FF

commandline.org.uk: In the last post I went through the most popular Firefox extensions and talked about whether they were good ideas or not. However, it seems that not a lot of people think about another side to this, i.e. what are your Firefox extensions licenced under?

Also: Firefox 3 RC1 forces you agree to EULA before usage
And: Welcome humans - We have come to visit you in peace and with goodwill!

A Fine Piece: Rhythmbox 0.11.5

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: Following audio players reviews like this or this, today I decided to review Rhythmbox 0.11.5, the GNOME audio player. At first glance, Rhythmbox made me a good impression: the layout is simple and clean, similar in many ways to many other players for GNOME, like Banshee, Listen or Exaile.

Linux Flash Player Is GPU Accelerated

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Adobe has been using the GPU to accelerate the Flash Player when displaying full-screen content since their December '07 Flash Player update, but with the Flash Player 10 Beta, new GPU acceleration modes are supported -- even on Linux.

Ubuntu still not ready to replace my desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

archisgore.blogspot: I've been using Ubuntu for the last couple of months, it still doesn't match the speed-of-use I get from my XP. Speed-of-use isn't always about raw speed of the software. Many times, there are simple UX pieces missing in the media players or GUI config tools which make you go to the command-line occasionally.

What might come of the OOXML revolt?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: It’s late, and in terms of the process it’s hopeless, but the appeals of the ISO vote making Office Open XML (OOXML) an official standard could still have an impact

Ubiquitous Linux, or, how to become a household commodity

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itwire.com: Whether it was to your taste or not, there’s no denying the ASUS Eee Linux subnotebook was a massive sales success. Demand far exceeded initial production so it’s not surprising competitor models are on their way. And here’s why the hardware manufacturers are going to bring Linux to the masses far in advance of any amount of Ubuntu fanboyism.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to disable vim syntax highlighting and coloring

  • vim taglist plugin for developers
  • Howto: graphical logout/shutdown/reboot in any Window Manager
  • Synchronizing a BlackBerry in Linux
  • Disable Ctrl+Alt+Backspace from Restarting X Windows on Linux
  • One way to change path on Ubuntu
  • Short Tip: Move an X window in Linux with the Alt key
  • Welcome KDE apps back onto your GNOME desktop
  • Changing the default 'generic' kernel to 'server' kernel
  • Installation of Fedora 9 with Vista on Dell 1525
  • A110 mini-laptop Debian installation HOWTO
  • Tips and Tricks for Using Xen under Ubuntu or Debian
  • Alternative Installation Methods for Hardy
  • Virtualbox 1.6.0 with Ubuntu 8.04 2.6.24-17-generic kernel
  • Howto Set Gnome Calendar First Day of Week in Ubuntu
  • Changing default applications

PCLinuxOS Moderation

Filed under
PCLOS
Web

linuxca.wordpres: It seems that PClinuxOS is getting slammed for the moderation by one or more mods. I feel that I need to put forth a view on this topic.

5 Ways the End-User Desktop Will Look Different in 5 Years

Filed under
Misc

eweek.com: Look around your organization. What does your end-user desktop environment look like? Windows-based PCs? Docked laptops? Some combination thereof? Look around your organization five years from now, and the desktop landscape will appear very different.

Will Epiphany be able to compete with Firefox's extensions?

Filed under
Software

commandline.org.uk: I recently looked at the forthcoming Epiphany browser based-on-Webkit. However, some people told me that Firefox has so many extensions that it would not be possible for a new browser to compete, even among the target audience of GNOME users. Is this true?

Free Postal 2 Multiplayer for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

icculus.org: To celebrate the release of the Postal movie, Running With Scissors has released a free download version of Postal 2: Share the Pain. This is the complete multiplayer portion of the game, with the single player campaign removed.

PCLinuxOS 2008.1 GNOME installed

Filed under
PCLOS

wamukota.blogspot: Being involved in the PCLinuxOS.NL team, I was constantly focusing on KDE. I thought it was about time to get to know a distro running GNOME, so last month I tried HH. The number one distro of the planet simply couldn't get my Wifi (Broadcom 4312) up and running out of the box. Next I tried Fedora 9 and once again it was no-joy with the Wifi.

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More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Stardew Valley is now in beta for Linux
    The Stardew Valley developer tweeted out a password for a beta, but after discussing it with them on their forum I was able to show them that we can't actually access it yet. While what I was telling them may not have been entirely correct (SteamDB is confusing), the main point I made was correct. Normal keys are not able to access the beta yet, but beta/developer keys can, as it's not currently set for Linux/Mac as a platform for us.
  • Physics-based 3D puzzler Human: Fall Flat released on Steam for Linux
    Human: Fall Flat is an open-ended physics puzzler with an optional local co-op mode, developed by No Brakes Games, and available now on Steam for Linux.
  • 7 Mages brings a touch more of traditional dungeon crawling to Linux
    Controlling a party of adventurers, exploring dungeons and fighting weird magical creatures is an RPG tradition as old as the genre. Expect all that and more in this modern iteration of the classical dungeon crawler.

Linux and Graphics

Security News

  • Security advisories for Monday
  • EU to Give Free Security Audits to Apache HTTP Server and Keepass
    The European Commission announced on Wednesday that its IT engineers would provide a free security audit for the Apache HTTP Server and KeePass projects. The EC selected the two projects following a public survey that took place between June 17 and July 8 and that received 3,282 answers. The survey and security audit are part of the EU-FOSSA (EU-Free and Open Source Software Auditing) project, a test pilot program that received funding of €1 million until the end of the year.
  • What is your browser really doing?
    While Microsoft would prefer you use its Edge browser on Windows 10 as part of its ecosystem, the most popular Windows browser is Google’s Chrome. But there is a downside to Chrome – spying and battery life. It all started when Microsoft recently announced that its Edge browser used less battery power than Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Opera on Windows 10 devices. It also measured telemetry – what the Windows 10 device was doing when using different browsers. What it found was that the other browsers had a significantly higher central processing unit (CPU), and graphics processing unit (GPU) overhead when viewing the same Web pages. It also proved that using Edge resulted in 36-53% more battery life when performing the same tasks as the others. Let’s not get into semantics about which search engine — Google or Bing — is better; this was about simple Web browsing, opening new tabs and watching videos. But it started a discussion as to why CPU and GPU usage was far higher. And it relates to spying and ad serving.
  • Is Computer Security Becoming a Hardware Problem?
    In December of 1967 the Silver Bridge collapsed into the Ohio River, killing 46 people. The cause was determined to be a single 2.5 millimeter defect in a single steel bar—some credit the Mothman for the disaster, but to most it was an avoidable engineering failure and a rebuttal to the design philosophy of substituting high-strength non-redundant building materials for lower-strength albeit layered and redundant materials. A partial failure is much better than a complete failure. [...] In 1996, Kocher co-authored the SSL v3.0 protocol, which would become the basis for the TLS standard. TLS is the difference between HTTP and HTTPS and is responsible for much of the security that allows for the modern internet. He argues that, barring some abrupt and unexpected advance in quantum computing or something yet unforeseen, TLS will continue to safeguard the web and do a very good job of it. What he's worried about is hardware: untested linkages in digital bridges.
  • Your Smart Robot Is Coming in Five Years, But It Might Get Hacked and Kill You
    A new report commissioned by the Department of Homeland Security forecasts that autonomous artificially intelligent robots are just five to 10 years away from hitting the mainstream—but there’s a catch. The new breed of smart robots will be eminently hackable. To the point that they might be re-programmed to kill you. The study, published in April, attempted to assess which emerging technology trends are most likely to go mainstream, while simultaneously posing serious “cybersecurity” problems. The good news is that the near future is going to see some rapid, revolutionary changes that could dramatically enhance our lives. The bad news is that the technologies pitched to “become successful and transformative” in the next decade or so are extremely vulnerable to all sorts of back-door, front-door, and side-door compromises.
  • Trump, DNC, RNC Flunk Email Security Test
    At issue is a fairly technical proposed standard called DMARC. Short for “domain-based messaging authentication reporting and conformance,” DMARC tries to solve a problem that has plagued email since its inception: It’s surprisingly difficult for email providers and end users alike to tell whether a given email is real – i.e. that it really was sent by the person or organization identified in the “from:” portion of the missive.
  • NIST Prepares to Ban SMS-Based Two-Factor Authentication
    The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has released the latest draft version of the Digital Authentication Guideline that contains language hinting at a future ban on SMS-based Two-Factor Authentication (2FA). The Digital Authentication Guideline (DAG) is a set of rules used by software makers to build secure services, and by governments and private agencies to assess the security of their services and software. NIST experts are constantly updating the guideline, in an effort to keep pace with the rapid change in the IT sector.
  • 1.6m Clash of Kings forum accounts 'stolen'
    Details about 1.6 million users on the Clash of Kings online forum have been hacked, claims a breach notification site. The user data from the popular mobile game's discussion forum were allegedly targeted by a hacker on 14 July. Tech site ZDNet has reported the leaked data includes email addresses, IP addresses and usernames.
  • Hacker steals 1.6 million accounts from top mobile game's forum
    [Ed: vBulletin is proprietary software -- the same crap Canonical used for Ubuntu forums]

The saga continues with Slackware 14.2

Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution and has been maintained since its birth by Patrick Volkerding. Slackware has a well deserved reputation for being stable, consistent and conservative. Slackware is released when it is ready, rather than on a set schedule, and fans of the distribution praise its no-frills and no-fuss design. Slackware adheres to a "keep it simple" philosophy similar to Arch Linux, in that the operating system does not do a lot of hand holding or automatic configuration. The user is expected to know what they are doing and the operating system generally stays out of the way. The latest release of Slackware, version 14.2, mostly offers software updates and accompanying hardware support. A few new features offer improved plug-n-play support for removable devices and this release of Slackware ships with the PulseAudio software. PulseAudio has been commonly found in the audio stack of most Linux distributions for several years, but that is a signature of Slackware: adding new features when they are needed, not when they become available. In this case PulseAudio was required as a dependency for another package. Slackware 14.2 is available in 32-bit and 64-bit builds for the x86 architecture. There is also an ARM build. While the main edition of Slackware is available as an installation disc only, there is a live edition of Slackware where we can explore a Slackware-powered desktop environment without installing the distribution. The live edition can be found on the Alien Base website. Both the live edition and the main installation media are approximately 2.6GB in size. For the purposes of this review I will be focusing on the main, installation-only edition. Booting from the install media brings us to a text screen where we are invited to type in any required kernel parameters. We can press the Enter key to take the default settings or wait two minutes for the media to continue booting. A text prompt then offers to let us load an alternative keyboard layout or use the default "US" layout. We are then brought to a text console where a brief blurb offers us tips for setting up disk partitions and swap space. The helpful text says we can create partitions and then run the system installer by typing "setup". Read more