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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 4:05pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 4:03pm
Story Plasma Mobile Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 4:01pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 3:56pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 3:55pm
Story Linux Mint 17.2 OEM images available Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 1:58pm
Story Plasma Mobile, a Free Mobile Platform Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 11:54am
Story The Lazarus Effect: Saved by Linux and Cash Converters Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 9:16am
Story Ubuntu Phone is shipping, but it appears the software isn’t ready Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 9:07am
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 25/07/2015 - 9:05am

Ubuntu 10.04 Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

linusearch.com: I have been keeping an eye on Ubuntu for a long time. The operating system itself has put out a lack luster performance on previous installs. In the past each time I had installed Ubuntu there was always a show stopper of some sort.

Is the FLOSS Community Shooting Itself In the Foot?

Filed under
OSS

g33q.co.za: Recently my blog attracted a lot of attention from readers who are more critical of FLOSS, and Linux in particular, than my regular readership. Naturally a long discussion erupted where critiques and defenses of various positions and opinions and how stuff works where flung to and fro.

“Kiddie” Linux distros

Filed under
Linux

robinzrants.wordpress: But most of the grownup Linux users I know (and I’d bet the majority of all Linux users of any age) do use the so-called “kiddie” distros because they’re not into running the operating system, they just want to run applications.

Nautilus Elementary Simplifies File Browsing

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Nautilus, the default file manager in Gnome-based Linux operating systems such as Ubuntu and Fedora, isn’t exactly pretty to look at. In fact at times it’s downright confusing. This is why a group of coders have taken Nautilus’ lack of an overhaul into their own hands. The project, called Nautilus Elementary.

Group policy for Unix

theregister.co.uk: I wanted to compare Unix GPO setups to Microsoft’s Active Directory (AD) and Novell’s offerings, but I find that all the really good ones don’t so much “compare” to these directory services as “integrate with them.” The comparisons that can be made are largely “what kinds of things can I manage via GPO on Unix systems?”

Performing Image Magic with ImageMagick

Filed under
Software
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: It can be used from the command line for quick needs or built into a more complex software suite. This guide will cover some of the most “magical” features of ImageMagick and provide examples of how to use it to solve everyday tasks.

A Five-Way Linux Distribution Comparison In 2010

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With many Linux distributions receiving major updates in recent weeks and months we have carried out a five-way Linux distribution comparison of openSUSE, Ubuntu, Fedora, PCLinuxOS, and Arch Linux. We have quite a number of tests comparing the 32-bit performance of these popular Linux distributions on older PC hardware.

ownCloud 1.0 is here

Filed under
Software

blog.karlitschek.de: ownCloud is a central place where you can store your files and documents. You don´t have to upload your personal data to central closed services like Google Docs, Dropbox or Ubuntu One. All the data is under your own control.

Top 10 Cursors For X Window System

Filed under
Software

linuxnov.com: Cool Cursors collection for X 11 window system, including animated cursors for different installed applications, some of those cursors will look really good for dark themes, and bright themes.

Capturing screen shots and program interaction on UNIX and Linux systems

Filed under
Linux

Modern UNIX systems provide a number of different tools to capture the text-oriented interaction between a user and a specific program and to capture graphical screens and single windows. This article focuses on different ways to keep a record of the interaction between a user and a command-line application.

Break your Ubuntu Addiction: Three Strong Distros

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: No one can make the claim that Ubuntu isn't becoming the de facto Linux distro out there in the world today. Sadly, there is also a problem with watching Linux being tied to a single experience. Choice goes right out the window. So thankfully, despite Ubuntu's success, there are some fantastic alternatives out there that fit the needs of most people.

Attack of the Cosmic Rays

Filed under
Hardware

blog.ksplice.com: RAM in modern computers is susceptible to occasional random bit flips due to various sources of noise, most commonly high-energy cosmic rays. A few weeks ago, though, I encountered some bizarre behavior on my desktop, that honestly just didn’t make sense.

NetworkManager will drive people away from GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: One of the great plus points about running GNU/Linux used to be the continuous process of improvement going on - and the fact that one did not have to wait very long to sample those improvements if one wished to do so. But in recent times, given the great push to make everything running on GNU/Linux graphically-oriented, that seems to have changed.

Why isn't Ubuntu good enough for US classrooms?

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com/blog: Ubuntu clearly rivals Windows 7 in terms of stability, speed, and functionality. Yet school IT staff who try to take advantage of this free software often meet with serious resistance.

Testing Out Btrfs In Ubuntu 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Yesterday we reported that Ubuntu 10.10 gained Btrfs installation support and since then we have been trying out this Btrfs support in Ubuntu "Maverick Meerkat" and have a fresh set of Btrfs benchmarks to serve up.

The Reg Guide to Linux, part 3

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Linux has changed almost beyond recognition since version 1.0 in 1994 and Ubuntu is about as polished and professional as it gets. It's approaching the level of polish of Mac OS X, is faster and easier to install than Windows, includes a whole suite of apps and offers tens of thousands more, runs on cheap commodity hardware and costs nothing.

A few more reason why FatELF is not

Filed under
Linux

blog.flameeyes.eu: Seems like people keep on expecting Ryan Gordon’s FatELF to solve all the problems. Today I was told I was being illogical by writing that it has no benefits. Well, I’d like to reiterate that.

Slackware Linux 13.1

Filed under
Slack

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: The latest stable release, 13.1, came out at the end of May - I'm a bit ashamed to say that it has taken me this long to get around to installing it. It is (of course) available in 32- and 64-bit versions, on an ISO DVD or 6 ISO CDs.

How To Set Up Software RAID1 On A Running LVM System (Ubuntu 10.04)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide explains how to set up software RAID1 on an already running LVM system (Ubuntu 10.04). The GRUB2 bootloader will be configured in such a way that the system will still be able to boot if one of the hard drives fails (no matter which one).

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Netbook Edition for ARM gets a video demo
  • HP spins a netbook just for schools
  • Smoke Screens and Linux
  • Linux: the people’s product (linux.com t-shirt)
  • Ultimate Edition gives SourceForge the ultimate compliment
  • Install a scanner in debian (and problem solving in general)
  • Linux's old KDE 3 desktop lives!?
  • Ubuntu Won't Become A Rolling Release Distro
  • First Look: VLC 1.1.0 on Ubuntu 10.04
  • Report: A fifth of Android apps expose private data
  • List: Linux Compatible USB Wireless Adapter (WUSB)
  • kmail’s akonadi migration in opensuse
  • FLOSS Weekly 125: The Lift Web Framework
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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux Experiences With AMD's Latest

  • AMD's Raven Ridge Botchy Linux Support Appears Worse With Some Motherboards/BIOS
    With my launch testing of the Raven Ridge desktop APUs with the Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G there were some stability issues to report and some hangs within games and mode-setting issues. It appears those issues are exacerbated with some motherboards: the past few days with two different AMD B350 motherboards have been a real pain getting the current AMDGPU driver stack working -- and even Linux 4.17 AMDGPU WIP code -- on either of these Raven Ridge APUs.
  • XDA’s First Full PC Build: An All-AMD Linux Desktop Featuring Ryzen and Polaris
    With GPU prices increasing exponentially over the past few months, it’s been hard to price out a PC. This particular build took us nearly a year to assemble; getting all the parts together was a challenge. (TK, our video producer, delivered the last piece of the puzzle after the Consumer Electronics Show in January.) Our goal was to show what a decent budget can get you in an all-AMD build, and what kind of performance you can expect from it. Thanks to AMD Ryzen and Polaris, we were able to do just that.
  • Ryzen 3 2200G Video Memory Size Testing On Linux
    One of the discussion items in the forums this week was about the video memory allowance for the Vega graphics on Raven Ridge APUs as well as efficiences or inefficiencies around the TTM memory manager as used by the AMDGPU kernel driver. Here are some vRAM size tests with the Ryzen 3 2200G.

Today in Techrights

Web Server Setup Series - Fix CWP Errors & Warnings To Improve Server Security

​Welcome to the second part of the web server setup series. In this part, I'll show you how to fix CWP (CentOS web panel) errors and warnings, create new user accounts, create hosting packages, and create FTP account. So let's start. Read
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How To Make Good Use Of 'grep' Command

​Linux and UNIX systems come with a shell command known as ‘grep’. This simply looks for a specified text, or pattern, in a file or an entire directory. The most common usage is for quickly searching a file for occurrences of a pattern, which can be in plain text, or in the form of a regular expression. Here, the patterns used will be simple text rather than regular expressions. Read
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