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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon Review srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 8:35pm
Story Yes, the Raspberry Pi will run Minecraft srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 8:32pm
Story Debian Project News - November 26th srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 6:04pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 484 srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 4:46pm
Story 10 reasons to choose Ubuntu 12.10 over Windows 8 srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 4:40pm
Story GNOME: Can this Linux desktop be saved? srlinuxx 26/11/2012 - 4:37pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 25/11/2012 - 9:24pm
Story The Best Three Linux Games of 2012 srlinuxx 24/11/2012 - 4:54am
Story How Versatile Is Linux? Three Examples srlinuxx 24/11/2012 - 4:52am
Story Cinnarch 2012.11.22 is Looking Sharp srlinuxx 24/11/2012 - 4:50am

Did Canonical Just Get Punked by Red Hat and Novell?

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: My first opinion during all of this hooplah was that why should I care about Red Hat and SUSE Linux not having a consumer desktop line? It doesn't detract from the Linux desktop as a whole (since their business desktop products are doing just fine, thank you), plus let's face it: Ubuntu is kicking butt and taking names. Except I think I may have been wrong.

Also: Red Hat, Novell, Canonical and the free software desktop

Microsoft Office 2007 Fails OOXML Conformance Tests

Filed under
Microsoft

groklaw.net: This takes the cake. Alex Brown has just admitted on his Griffin Brown blog and further to ZDNET UK's Peter Judge that Microsoft Office 2007 has failed two OOXML conformance tests he ran. Color me surprised.

The Trials and Travails of Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Over the years I've been slowly working towards getting myself a laptop, but ultimately one thing or another stopped me. But these days you almost can't live without one. So I finally made the plunge. But obviously before I did that I also spent a decent amount of time researching whether or not Linux or Freebsd would work on said laptop before I bought it.

Is it lift off for Linux?

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

bbc.co.uk/blogs: I had a very interesting conversation with Mr Ubuntu, aka Mark Shuttleworth, at the end of last week. His main point was that Linux, and use of Ubuntu, was on the rise. He also had lots of interesting things to say about open source more broadly, the Microsoft-Yahoo deal etc, which I thought I'd detail here as a Q&A.

One last, good look at KDE 3

Filed under
KDE

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: I initially loved KDE over Gnome. It looked more like Windows, it had more neat options, and great programs. But I left KDE for Gnome for a few reasons. But now I want to look at KDE again because a few things have come together to change some of the reasons why I left KDE.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 249

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Draco GNU/Linux 0.3

  • News: Fedora 9 delay, Ubuntu 8.04 LTS release, openSUSE's OBS update, Red Hat and
  • OpenSolaris desktops, Gobuntu vs gNewSense, sidux-seminarix

  • Released last week: BeleniX 0.7, DragonFly BSD 1.12.2
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 8.04 LTS
  • New distributions: Turtle Kevux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Add faceted search to Thunderbird with Seek

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Do you struggle to keep tabs on your Thunderbird inbox? The SIMILE Seek extension might be the answer to your problems. The extension adds faceted browsing to Thunderbird, which allows you to search and manage your email messages in a radically different way than you are used to.

A case study: Video Ezy and Microsoft myths about open source lead to flawed network

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: The Redmond giant’s PR spin has gone into overdrive to warn budding potentials away from the evils of Linux and open source. The messages are consistent: Linux may be free, but there’s a catch; it has a higher total cost of ownership, a lower return on investment, less support and is a less sound platform. I declare bunkum. And here's why.

Linux FUDdy duddy!

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox.com: This morning I was shocked to see the headline "Seagate Kills Linux Support" in Linux Today. I followed the link to the story on Mad Penguin. In this story, or should I say unsubstantiated rant, the author goes on about how Seagate has foregone support for Linux and how everyone should boycott Seagate and go to Western Digital. This is pure and unadulterated FUD!

Ubuntu 'reaping Linux dividend'

Filed under
Ubuntu

news.bbc.co.uk: The public perception of open source software is changing fast, said Mark Shuttleworth, who leads distribution of the Ubuntu operating system (OS). "There has been a sea change in the way people think of Linux, which is very healthy," he said.

Also: Ubuntu 8.04 LTS Desktop Edition Released

Novell expands Microsoft alliance with China deal

Filed under
SUSE

boston.com: Linux software vendor Novell Inc. of Waltham is expanding its alliance with Microsoft Corp. into China, in a bid to encourage Chinese companies to start paying for the software they use to run their businesses.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sar, Vmstat, Free Memory And Swap On Linux or Unix

  • Open Solutions Alliance looking for momentum boost
  • Back to the future for MySQL
  • eeePC Video With Compiz-Fusion
  • OTR: Secure Conversations
  • Bradley Kuhn makes a better world through software freedom

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Running SPIN (Promela Model Checking) on linux

  • HOWTO install and run rkhunter
  • Get your fingerprint reader to work in Ubuntu
  • Find File by Modification Time
  • Howto: Printer sharing with CUPS
  • rcdrecord is a command line client of web CDwriter
  • Save Streaming Videos in Mplayer in 4 Easy Steps
  • Automatically compile and install the latest kernel using KernelCheck in Ubuntu

While Everyone Else Is Awaiting The Release Of Hardy Heron, I Am Not

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcanuck.wordpress: I see counters on websites. Only four more days to the official release. Only three more days. And then what? The wait will be over. The counter will increase to six months until Intrepid Ibex. And what exactly will happen on the 24th anyway? It will be slow going if past releases are any indicator. I have a better plan.

Debian 4 GNU/Linux with KDE

agnustics.blogspot: My distribution of choice is Debian. It's currently at version 4 and named Etch. Debian, in my opinion, is rock-solid stable and does absolutely everything I ask it to. A word of advise before you install Linux.

5 Months And Still No UT3 For Linux

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Five months ago from today, Unreal Tournament 3 for the PC was released in North America. Linux gamers around the world, however, were let down with the lack of an available Linux client and all UT3 gamers were impacted by the lack of any Linux server for this game.

What Should I Use - PCLinuxOS or Windows XP or Mac OSX?

Filed under
OS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Some previous Windows users claim to have tried Linux and found it to be not suitable them. Even some long time Linux users tell that it's not good. However, some others are fanatic about Linux - they would go out of their way to help new linux users and love to create a propaganda for their pet OS.

Two Weeks with Fedora 9

Filed under
Linux

blogs.eweek.com: Impressed by the persistent USB LiveCD fun and partition encrypting installer improvements, I chose to throw caution to the wind and load up Fedora 9 Beta on my main notebook, replacing the beta Hardy Heron install I'd been running--quite stably--for several weeks.

Also: Fedora 9 & Kernel Mode Setting

Mandriva on a Low cost notebook : Kira

Filed under
Hardware
MDV

linux-wizard.net: Many people are talking about the Asus Eee PC : low cost, tiny, and for the "geeks", running Linux. Mandriva 2008 Spring is compatible out of the box with Asus Eee PC. However a new low cost PC is appearing, done by a spanish company : AIRIS KIRA.

mandriva installation on acer 5050 laptop

Filed under
MDV

bearrider.wordpress: Kubuntu left a lot to be desired on my machine so I looked around for another good KDE distro and found Mandriva!

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more