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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story SparkyLinux 3.1 Is an Interesting Blend srlinuxx 04/10/2013 - 3:31am
Story Ubuntu: Five Requirements for Success srlinuxx 04/10/2013 - 3:25am
Story MyGameCompany Is Shutting Its Doors srlinuxx 04/10/2013 - 3:21am
Story Poll Says Too Many Distros srlinuxx 04/10/2013 - 12:54am
Story GNOME 3.10 Reflections srlinuxx 04/10/2013 - 12:53am
Story Kdenlive Delivers Near-Pro Video Editing - If You Have the Right Stuff srlinuxx 04/10/2013 - 12:51am
Story Oregon State boosts Open Source Lab by bringing it into academic fold srlinuxx 03/10/2013 - 9:55pm
Story Red Hat's Valuation Finally Matters srlinuxx 03/10/2013 - 9:54pm
Story Mageia 4 Alpha 3 Released for Testing srlinuxx 03/10/2013 - 9:52pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 03/10/2013 - 5:06pm

Who is promoting Linux? and who isn't.

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: We read columns, articles, blogs all the time, telling us where companies should be adopting GNU/Linux, tossing out other OS's and using Open Source software to reap maximum savings.

New tab switching added for Firefox 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: As announced before, tab switching is getting a dramatic update for Firefox 3.1 in both visual and behavior.

Will hypervisors make Ubuntu and other Linux operating systems obsolete?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Computing is on the verge of a major paradigm shift with the modern rise in prominence of virtualisation. Fuelled by big corporates interested in the consolidation and energy saving potentials, improvements in virtualisation have hit the point where Linux could be a casualty. Here’s why:

Arch Linux for the DIY Linux user

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: There's no dearth of Linux distributions for desktop users or even for running high availability servers. But if you are a do-it-yourself computer user, your choice of Linux distros is fairly limited. You can build Linux from scratch with Linux from Scratch or compile your own set of packages with Gentoo. But if you want a distro that teaches you the basics of Linux as you set it up; is well documented, lightweight, and zippy; and has a dependency-resolving packaging system, you need Arch Linux.

Open Source OS's Part 2: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

thedullbulb.blogspot: Today we will focus on Ubuntu. I really like Ubuntu. It was the first Linux distro that I used and I really think it is intuitive and very similar to Windows XP. Ubuntu does all the basic things you would expect from an OS and with style.

CyberLink Sees Opportunities in Netbooks, Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software

pcworld.com: Multimedia software maker CyberLink sees a lot of opportunities in the fast-growing netbook segment of the computer market, from online access to files stored on home PCs to multimedia software made for Linux OSs.

KDE 4.1 Packages available

Filed under
KDE

AbiWord: A Scalpel, Not a Chain Saw

Filed under
Software

linuxinsider.com: AbiWord is an open source word processing program that offers basic functions without getting bogged down with unnecessary features, writes Los Angeles Daily News columnist Steven Rosenberg. While OpenOffice offers a more full-featured alternative to Microsoft Office, AbiWord is slim and loads faster, especially on slow computers.

Package Management Security on openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: There has been a report looking at package management security on various distributions that IMO was rather condensed in its summary report and therefore raised some false alarms for various distributions including openSUSE.

Ubuntu is not perfect

Filed under
Ubuntu

jldugger.livejournal: Nick Ali, author of the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter (among other things), writes that Ubuntu doesn't get a fair shake in a Pingdom report on update site availability. Microsoft had a measured 100% response to pings, Apple a 99.9%.

Disk corruption can be virtual too

Filed under
Software

technologytales.com: It’s the sort of sight that causes you to fear the worst, an unchanging black screen with a flashing cursor. That was what started greet me in recent days when I tried to fire up a Windows XP guest in VMware Workstation.

aria2: high speed command line download utility

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: If you’re a frequent downloader and comfortable on the command line, then you need to try out aria2. aria2 is a cross platform download utility, similar to graphical download managers except that it uses less system resources.

Ubuntu Ireland goes for open source success

Filed under
Ubuntu

siliconrepublic.com: Microsoft Windows remains the standard operating system (OS) for most personal computers throughout the world but advocates for the open source Linux-based OS Ubuntu are pushing its benefits for personal, educational and organisational uses, not least because it is free and community developed.

How Does OpenOffice 3.0 Beta Handle Microsoft Office Files?

Filed under
OOo

linuxloop.com: Like it or not, one of the most important features of any Microsoft Office alternative is being able to read Microsoft Office files. With the recently released OpenOffice 3.0 Beta adding support for importing Office 2007 files, I decided to test.

12 Web Browsers for Linux - Review

Filed under
Linux

The article reviews 12 web browsers for Linux, including GUI and CLI ones. Among the popular ones like Firefox, Opera or Konqueror, included are Kazehakase, Galeon, Epiphany, Dillo, lynx, w3m, elinks, links2, links.

9 File Managers for Linux

Filed under
Linux

9 file managers for Linux, including Konqueror, Nautilus, Krusader, Xfe, PCManFM and Thunar

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Firefox 2.0.0.16 security and stability update now available

  • Survey about openSUSE 11.0
  • Linux Outlaws 47 - Hip with Da Yoof
  • Chris Pirillo on Ubuntu, and me correcting him…
  • Finding Version Information On Ubuntu Hardy Heron
  • Hammering at cost with open source
  • A Storm In The Computing World: Stormy Peters
  • A few things you may not know about YUM
  • Thoughts on OpenSUSE 11.0
  • How to revert to pure Debian
  • Perl and Bash Versions Of Binary To Decimal Conversion Script
  • Ubuntu….painful experience
  • Windows, Linux, and Mac housing projects
  • Offline Wikipedia for Linux

Event aims to bring Lindependence to one California town

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: An enterprising group has taken on a radical approach in attracting users to Linux: switch a whole town! Dubbed "Lindependence 2008" (a.k.a. LIN08), this event strives to switch citizens in Felton, Calif., for at least a week from Microsoft Windows to Linux.

Windows Now Open Source

Filed under
Linux

linuxtreat.blogspot: The news is here, today 'LinuxTreat' in association with other open-source developer had released some flavor of Windows for free. If you are shocked, here are some screen shots of this 'Open Windows Flavor' with their description.

More Productive “Open With” method

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuproductivity.com: In switching from the Mac OS Leopard to Ubuntu Linux there was one Mac feature I seriously missed—the ability to drag-and-drop a file onto any application icon to open it. On Linux (at least the setup I am running—Ubuntu 8.04 Linux with the Gnome 2.22 desktop) this does not seem to be possible.

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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more