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Thursday, 19 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Nvidia Linux Video Driver Adds Support for Nine GPUs and Fixes a Kernel Memory Leak Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 10:16pm
Story XPS with Ubuntu 14.04 Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 10:13pm
Story BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review: A promising start Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 10:10pm
Story Firefox 37.0.1 Lands in Supported Ubuntu OSes Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 10:04pm
Story Ubuntu 15.10 to Finally Drop Python 2.X Support Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:57pm
Story Basque parliament adapts workflow to eID tool Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:44pm
Story Top 6 Ways To Get Your iTunes Experience On Linux Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:41pm
Story Linux-ready smart camera SoC encodes 1080p@70fps video Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:40pm
Story diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development Roy Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:32pm
Story MintBox Mini PC Powered by Linux Mint Finally Released, Already Sold Out Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 9:32pm

Nautilus Elementary: A Simplified Nautilus For Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

webupd8.org: Remember the Simplified Nautilus? At some point, it used to be maintained in the Gloobus PPA. The Gloobus PPA no longer maintains this simplified Nautilus (for quite some time), but a recent post on the Gloobus blog points out to a new "simplified" Nautilus called Nautilus Elementary.

Manage your photo collection with F-Spot

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: There are tons of applications out there that help you manage your photo collections. Some of these applications are nothing more than glorified file managers, some are more in-line with image editors. Stuck in the middle of this vast gray area are tools like F-Spot which serve a very specific purpose – manage your photo collections.

Monty releases MySQL fork MariaDB RC

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: A fully completed first version of MySQL fork MariaDB has come a step closer, with a release candidate delivered by Monty Widenius on Monday.

In Pictures: The Australasia and Linux Quiz

Filed under
Linux
  • In Pictures: The Australasia and Linux Quiz
  • linux.conf.au 2010: Day 2 (morning), (afternoon)
  • linux.conf.au is Live

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Nautilus Just Got Gorgeous
  • Radio Tray- An online radio streaming player
  • Distro Here & There, But Nary a Good KDE 4 Distro Anywhere?
  • Should Ubuntu include proprietary software?
  • Open Source Helps Earthquake Victims in Haiti
  • IBM Client for Smart Work with Ubuntu support released
  • The Computer Action Show! S02E02
  • Gentoo Prefix: ARM hardware
  • Google, China, and the future of freedom on the global Internet
  • Nokia Booklet 3G review

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Configure Apache as a Forward / Reverse Proxy
  • Use iptables to block access using mac address
  • How to Setup Transparent Squid Proxy Server in Ubuntu
  • One key to Quick Setup fresh installed Ubuntu with Ailurus
  • Hidden Linux : NetHogs
  • Slidy : How to create an HTML Slideshow
  • Restart USB in Ubuntu Jaunty/Karmic
  • Catfish - file search tool that support several different engines
  • Easy Linux backup software with Time Machine like functionality
  • Auto shutdown your computer in Linux
  • GNU/Linux: rdesktop - Working on a Windows Based PC Remotely

Steps to adopt open source standards draw flak

Filed under
OSS

indiatimes.com: India’s open source software lobbyists allege that the country’s proposed draft recommendations for adopting open technology standards and software for automating different government departments and functions, favours popular software solutions from large companies such as Microsoft.

Linux and USB 3.0

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: The newest, fast interface, USB 3.0, is finally out, but only one operating system has native support for it: Linux.

ext4: prime time in three years, says Ts'o

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: It will take about two or three years for the ext4 filesystem, that has been adopted as the default by some community GNU/Linux distributions, to be routinely deployed on production systems, according to senior Linux kernel hacker Theodore Ts'o.

The Disney Ptex library has been released as open source under the BSD license

Filed under
Software

cgsociety.org: The Disney Ptex library is now available to the public community of texture artists, lighters and modelers.

Demystifying Open Source

Filed under
OSS

sys-con.com: In 2008, the open source community saw the year end with a headline-catching lawsuit, the Free Software Foundation files suit against Cisco for General Public License (GPL) violations. Not to be outdone, 2009 also ended with a bang. Best Buy, Samsung, JVC and 11 other consumer electronics companies were named in a copyright infringement lawsuit filed on December 14, 2009, by the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) on behalf of the Software Freedom Conservancy.

Opera 10.50 Alpha

Filed under
Software

lockergnome.com: The people at Opera Labs are being very careful with this release, and taking much time before going so far as to call a delivered product a beta. Another build, 3199, has been released as alpha, dropping the pre- from the moniker.

Linux command line tips

Filed under
HowTos

ghacks.net: I thought it would be useful to break away from all the GUI-goodness and offer up a few command line tips and tricks. Why? No matter how powerful, user-friendly, and modern the Linux desktop becomes, there may come a time when you want to step up your game and get down and dirty with the command line interface.

Lubuntu 10.04 Alpha 1 - Visual Overview

Filed under
Ubuntu

omgubuntu.co.uk: April 29th will see the release of new addition to the Ubuntu family. Joining Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Xubuntu will be a new lightweight version - Lubuntu.

Stable kernel tree status, January 18

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: Here's the state of the -stable kernel trees, as of January 18, 2010.

Puppy Arcade 5 & Q&A with Scott Jarvis

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
Gaming

openbytes.wordpress: How things have changed today and the demand for retro gaming is reflected in the amount of emulation projects there are in progress. Puppy Arcade aims to provide all your retro computing desires. It’s based on tiny TurboPup Xtreme, which itself it a highly optimized version of Puppy Linux.

Ubuntu Desktop Alpha 2 and Alpha 3 Work Item Update

Filed under
Ubuntu

theravingrick.blogspot: As you are probably aware, in Lucid the platform team is working and re-planning in three separate milestones. Last week we passed the first such milestone, Alpha 2. The desktop team then re-planned for the next milestone, Alpha 3.

Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part VI: nerd_tree.vim

Filed under
Software

catonmat.net: This is the sixth post in the article series “Vim Plugins You Should Know About“. This time I am going to introduce you to a vim plugin called “nerd_tree.vim“. It’s so useful that I can’t imagine working without it in vim.

Drupal's Dries Buytaert on Building the Next Drupal

Filed under
Interviews
Drupal

itworld.com: Among the many open source projects on the upswing is Drupal, a content management system written in PHP; Drupal has attracted a lot of attention from developers and mindshare among end users. This week, when Drupal 7 was about to go into Alpha test, I spoke with Dries.

ReactOS May Begin Heavily Using Wine Code

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: While we don't normally talk much about ReactOS, the free software operating system that was started some twelve years ago to provide binary compatible with Windows NT, there is a new proposal to abandon much of its Win32 subsystem that has built up over the past decade and to create a new Windows subsystem that in large part is derived from Wine code.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, Smartwatches, Google, NSA, Microsoft and Flexera FUD

  • WPA2 flaw's worst impact on Android, Linux devices

    The flaw in the WPA2 wireless protocol revealed recently has a critical impact on Android phones running version 6.0 of the mobile operating system and Linux devices, a security researcher says.

  • Why the Krack Wi-Fi Mess Will Take Decades to Clean Up

    But given the millions of routers and other IoT devices that will likely never see a fix, the true cost of Krack could play out for years.

  • 'All wifi networks' are vulnerable to hacking, security expert discovers

    WPA2 protocol used by vast majority of wifi connections has been broken by Belgian researchers, highlighting potential for internet traffic to be exposed

  • Kids' smartwatches can be 'easily' hacked, says watchdog

    Smartwatches bought for children who do not necessarily need them can be hacked [sic], according to a warning out of Norway and its local Consumer Council (NCC).

  • John Lewis pulls children's smartwatch from sale over spying fears

    The Norwegian Consumer Council (NCC) revealed that several brands of children’s smartwatch, have such poor security controls that hackers [sic] could easily follow their movements and eavesdrop on conversations.

  • Google's 'Advanced Protection' Locks Down Accounts Like Never Before

    Google hasn't shared the details of what that process entails. But the CDT's Hall, whom Google briefed on the details, says it will include a "cooling-off" period that will lock the account for a period of time while the user proves his or her identity via several other factors. That slowed-down, intensive check is designed to make the account-recovery process a far less appealing backdoor into victims' data.

  • NSA won't say if it knew about KRACK, but don't look to this leaked doc for answers
    Given how involved the NSA has been with remote and local exploitation of networks, systems, devices, and even individuals, many put two and two together and assumed the worst. What compounded the matter was that some were pointing to a 2010-dated top secret NSA document leaked by whistleblower Edward Snowden, which detailed a hacking tool called BADDECISION, an "802.11 CNE tool" -- essentially an exploit designed to target wireless networks by using a man-in-the-middle attack within range of the network. It then uses a frame injection technique to redirect targets to one of the NSA's own servers, which acts as a "matchmaker" to supply the best malware for the target device to ensure it's compromised for the long-term. The slide said the hacking tool "works for WPA/WPA2," suggesting that BADDECISION could bypass the encryption. Cue the conspiracy theories. No wonder some thought the hacking tool was an early NSA-only version of KRACK.
  • You're doing open source wrong, Microsoft tsk-tsk-tsks at Google: Chrome security fixes made public too early [Ed: Says the company that gives back doors to the NSA and attacks FOSS with patents, lobbying etc.]
  • Why Open Source Security Matters for Healthcare Orgs [Ed: marketing slant for firms that spread FUD]
    Open source software can help healthcare organizations remain flexible as they adopt new IT solutions, but if entities lack open source security measures it can lead to larger cybersecurity issues. A recent survey found that organizations in numerous industries might not be paying enough attention to potential open source risk factors. Half of all code used in commercial and Internet of Things (IoT) software products is open source, but only 37 percent of organizations have an open source acquisition or usage policy, according to a recent Flexera report. More than 400 commercial software suppliers and in-house software development teams were interviewed, with respondent roles including software developers, DevOps, IT, engineering, legal, and security.

Games: JASEM, openage, Riskers, Rise to Ruins, Slime Rancher

The most promising linux distributions in 2017

Linux distributions have already gained recognition of its users and with every year new products appear in the market. Many of them focus on the certain tasks, so you can’t create a single list of the best ones. Here we have chosen several fields of Linux use and those distributions that have all chances to take the initial positions in their niche in 2017. Read more

Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) released

Codenamed "Artful Aardvark", Ubuntu 17.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technology into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. As always, the team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs. Under the hood, there have been updates to many core packages, including a new 4.13-based kernel, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2, and much more. Ubuntu Desktop has had a major overhaul, with the switch from Unity as our default desktop to GNOME3 and gnome-shell. Along with that, there are the usual incremental improvements, with newer versions of GTK and Qt, and updates to major packages like Firefox and LibreOffice. Read more Also: Ubuntu 17.10 Debuts Officially with GNOME 3.26 on Top of Wayland, Linux 4.13 How to: Upgrade Ubuntu 17.04 to Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 ISOs Officially Released 10 Things To Do After Installing Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Now Available to Download, This Is What’s New How to Enable Night Light on Ubuntu 17.10 Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark Released With New Features — Download Torrents And ISO Files Here Ubuntu Flavors, Including Ubuntu MATE 17.10, Are Available to Download Ubuntu 17.10 'Artful Aardvark' ditches Unity for Gnome