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Friday, 19 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu Utils – It’s The Little Things

Filed under
Software

lockergnome.com: Sometimes in life, you have to get it where you can. In that spirit, I got to thinking about which smalls apps or utilities really made things great on my (X)Ubuntu systems.

Who Cares if FOSS Is Profitable?

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: Does money make the FOSS world go round? Perhaps. Making money is what gives people and projects "the option of continuing to be free, as opposed to 'selling out' or abandoning the whole thing just to pay the bills."

Firefighters Save Money Switiching to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Firefighters Save Money Switiching to Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Linux is Prime Time for your Business Notebook & Desktop
  • Ubuntu derivatives flourish
  • Ubuntu Light Shuts Out Future Ubuntu Moblin/MeeGo Remixes
  • The Performance Of Ubuntu KVM Virtualization

Over a hundred Finland schools using open source

Filed under
OSS
Ubuntu

osor.eu: More than a hundred schools across Finland are using open source for all of their desktop PCs, according to Opinsys, an open source services provider.

Pidgin 2.7.0 addresses emoticon vulnerability

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The Pidgin developers have announced the release of version 2.7.0 of their open source instant messenger application.

Illumination Software Creator Beta 1

Filed under
Software

lunduke.com: The Illumination Software Creator allows you to visually create your application by linking together colorful building blocks of functionality.

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid Lynx review

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcadvisor.co.uk: Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid Lynx is the latest Linux operating system from Canonical, aimed at consumers. It's free, but is it sufficiently consumer friendly that you should switch from Windows?

OpenOffice.org Still Kicking

Filed under
OOo

ostatic.com/blog: Reports to contrary, the launch of Microsoft Office 2010 doesn't mean that OpenOffice.org is dead — or even wounded.

My First Linux Distribution

Filed under
PCLOS

cidtux.blogspot: I was starting to build a internet cafe. Thinking about how to make a internet cafe with low budget. Operating system with licence is too expensive. So i googling internet. And i found a sistem operation called "pclinux3d" i think this is a linux operating system.

Canonical’s Red Headed Stepchildren

Filed under
Ubuntu

jimlynch.com: In addition to Ubuntu, Canonical also produces or recognizes a number of Ubuntu derivatives such Kubuntu and Edubuntu. These derivatives offer different desktop environments or a more focused selection of software, geared toward a particular purpose.

How to Become Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Most people in the free software world know about the famous “LINUX is obsolete” thread that began on the comp.os.minix newsgroups in January 1992, where Andrew Tanenbaum, creator of the MINIX system that Linus used to learn about operating system design, posted the following rather incendiary comment:

About Mandriva’s current situation

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com (Mandriva’s CEO): These last days, numerous rumors have been spread about Mandriva’s situation. Out of respect for our clients and community, we want to clear the situation.

Enable RGBA Transparency In Ubuntu 9.10 and 10.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

As you probably know, RGBA transparency was planned to be released with Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Lucid Lynx but it eventually didn't made it because of some issues such as various applications crashing and so on. RGBA transparency has been confirmed to be included in Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat by Mark Shuttleworth at UDS-M but if you can't wait, you can try it using an Ubuntu PPA.

Gnome Shell Might Add Real Multiple Desktops

Filed under
Linux

Right now you have multiple desktops but only from the applications point of view: you can move applications from one desktop to another and that's it. There is currently a mockup posted @ Gnome Shell Design Playground website (and a lot of discussion about it on the Gnome Shell mailing list) which seems very interesting:

[Rest here]

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Being KDE
  • Kuwait Ministry of Electricity & Water Migrates to Red Hat
  • The Graduate's Guide To Finding Work In Open Source
  • Gentoo just makes sense!
  • Bash scripts to scan and monitor network
  • Ubuntu Has Plans For Btrfs In 2011, 2012
  • Nautilus-Elementary With Zeitgeist Brings Semantic file browsing to Ubuntu [Screencast]
  • A US Army Federal Employee's Linux Workspace
  • The Ubuntu Support and Learning Center
  • Reseting your system wide cursor theme in ubuntu
  • Evaluate Open Source Software
  • Facebook has problems, Diaspora isn't one of them
  • Linux Outlaws 148 - You Cannot Grep People

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Intel GMA 500, “Poulsbo” on Ubuntu
  • download files in Linux from command line with dynamic url
  • get visualizations back in Linux
  • How to use Dropbox with KDropbox
  • Planting a Tree, Unix-Style
  • Find Your IP Address in Ubuntu Linux
  • Bash Special Parameters Explained with 4 Examples
  • Linux Mint 8 on T91MT
  • Python 3.1: String Formatting
  • Linux super-duper admin tools: lsof

Gentoo Failed Us Again

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.flameeyes.eu: I’ve spent the past week or so away from computers, I came back to updating my systems today, and I received a nasty surprise.

OpenOffice vs. Google Docs

Filed under
OOo

linuxplanet.com: Microsoft is getting ready to ship Office 2010, but a lot of small businesses realize they don't need all the features (or licensing costs) that come with Microsoft Office. The front-runners for Office replacements are OpenOffice.org and Google Docs, but which one is right for your business?

Peppermint OS One

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinuxreviews.com: Peppermint OS One is a web-centric Ubuntu remaster that passes up common desktop applications like OpenOffice.org in favor of web-based alternatives such as Google Docs. And it doesn’t stop with office applications either;

Best Newbie Linux Distro

Filed under
Linux

dontsurfinthenude.blogspot: I'm been taking a look at some of the alternatives to Ubuntu, the Linux distribution I've been using for two and a half years now. Ubuntu tends to grab all of the attention, but how do some of the alternatives compare?

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More in Tux Machines

PlayOnLinux For Easier Use Of Wine

PlayOnLinux is a free program that helps to install, run, and manage Windows software on Linux. It can also manage virtual C: drives (known as Wine prefixes), and download and install certain Windows libraries for getting some software to run on Wine properly. Creating different drives using different Wine versions is also possible. It is very handy because what runs well in one version may not run as well (if at all) on a newer version. There is PlayOnMac for macOS and PlayOnBSD for FreeBSD. Read
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Linux Kernel: KPTI, SEV, CBS

  • Experimental KPTI Support For x86 32-bit Linux
    For the Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) support currently within the Linux kernel for addressing the Meltdown CPU vulnerability it's currently limited to 64-bit on the x86 side, but for the unfortunate souls still running x86 32-bit operating systems, SUSE is working on such support.
  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Is Ready To Roll With Linux 4.16
    With the Linux 4.16 kernel cycle that is expected to begin immediately following the Linux 4.15 kernel debut on Sunday, AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) technology supported by their new EPYC processors will be mainline. Going back to the end of 2016 have been Linux patches for Secure Encrypted Virtualization while with Linux 4.16 it will finally be part of the mainline kernel and supported with KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) virtualization.
  • Deadline scheduler part 2 — details and usage
    Linux’s deadline scheduler is a global early deadline first scheduler for sporadic tasks with constrained deadlines. These terms were defined in the first part of this series. In this installment, the details of the Linux deadline scheduler and how it can be used will be examined. The deadline scheduler prioritizes the tasks according to the task’s job deadline: the earliest absolute deadline first. For a system with M processors, the M earliest deadline jobs will be selected to run on the M processors. The Linux deadline scheduler also implements the constant bandwidth server (CBS) algorithm, which is a resource-reservation protocol. CBS is used to guarantee that each task will receive its full run time during every period. At every activation of a task, the CBS replenishes the task’s run time. As the job runs, it consumes that time; if the task runs out, it will be throttled and descheduled. In this case, the task will be able to run only after the next replenishment at the beginning of the next period. Therefore, CBS is used to both guarantee each task’s CPU time based on its timing requirements and to prevent a misbehaving task from running for more than its run time and causing problems to other jobs.

Graphics: Mesa and AMDGPU

  • Mesa 17.3.3 Released With RADV & ANV Vulkan Driver Fixes
    Mesa 17.3.3 is now available as the latest point release for the Mesa 17.3 stable series. This bi-weekly point release to Mesa presents several RADV Vega/GFX9 fixes, various Intel ANV Vulkan driver fixes, a DRI3 fix, and random fixes to the OpenGL drivers like RadeonSI, Etnaviv, and even Swrast.
  • R600g "Soft" FP64 Shows Signs Of Life, Enabling Older GPUs To Have OpenGL 4 In 2018
    Most pre-GCN AMD graphics cards are still limited to OpenGL 3.3 support at this time due to not supporting FP64. Only the HD 5800/6900 series on R600g currently have real double-precision floating-point support working right now so at present they are on OpenGL 4.3 rather than 3.3, but those other generations may be catching up soon thanks to the "soft" FP64 code.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets More Raven Ridge Improvements, Audio Fixes
    Harry Wentland of AMD has sent out the latest batch of patches for the AMDGPU DC display code stack. Fortunately it lightens up the DRM driver by about six thousand lines thanks to removing some unused code. Besides gutting out a chunk of unused code, the DC code has a few audio fixes (no word yet on supporting newer audio formats with DC), fixes on driver unload, a "bunch" of continued Raven Ridge display updates, and various other code clean-ups.
  • AMDGPU Firmware Blobs Updated For Video Encode/Decode
    There are updated AMDGPU microcode/firmware files now available for recent Radeon GPUs. The updated firmware files now available via the main linux-firmware.git repository are centered around the video blocks: UVD video decoding, VCE video encode, and the new VCN video encode/decode block with Raven Ridge.

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