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Monday, 25 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint KDE Still Possible Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 4:24pm
Story nano-4.0 is released Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 4:21pm
Story Kodachi OS Review Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 4:13pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 3:45pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 3:44pm
Story Security: Flawed Government Sites, Windows Disasters, and an SSH Tarpit Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 3:41pm
Story Licensing: Amazon AWS, CAST and Free and Open source Software (FOSS) Licences Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 2:51pm
Story Graphics: OpenXR, Code From Nvidia, OpenChrome Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 2:37pm
Story FOSS in Net/CMS: Decentralized 'Social Networks', 'Web 3.0', Apache and eLife Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 2:15pm
Story Deception, FUD and Entryism/Openwashing Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2019 - 2:10pm

HowTos and Programming

Filed under
Development
HowTos

10 Best lightweight browsers for Linux or Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Web

Web Browsers, the day when they started making our lives easier by allowing us to crawl the internet to today’s world; they have been gone through numerous technological advancements. Browsers are quite advance to handle high-end graphics, online videos, apps and more without the help of third-party software. But this also has made them heavy in terms of consuming hardware resources, means more RAM and storage space. Such kind of browsers works well on good system configuration machines, however, Linux operating systems those are running on old PC or laptops or low configuration systems require light browsers with a minimal approach to work fast.

Mainstream browser or shall I say the dominated one: Google Chrome that Linux users refrain themselves from instaling it on their machines is rather resourced consuming browser. This is the main reason why most of the Linux OS like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Centos and more come with Firefox Mozilla but somewhere it still not that much lightweight as we need it to be. So, I have done some research and gathered some lightweight Linux browsers.

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Webauthn in Linux with a TPM via the HID gadget

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Account security on the modern web is a bit of a nightmare. Everyone understands the need for strong passwords which are different for each account, but managing them is problematic because the human mind just can’t remember hundreds of complete gibberish words so everyone uses a password manager (which, lets admit it, for a lot of people is to write it down). A solution to this problem has long been something called two factor authentication (2FA) which authenticates you by something you know (like a password) and something you posses (like a TPM or a USB token). The problem has always been that you ideally need a different 2FA for each website, so that a compromise of one website doesn’t lead to the compromise of all your accounts.

Enter webauthn. This is designed as a 2FA protocol that uses public key cryptography instead of shared secrets and also uses a different public/private key pair for each website. Thus aspiring to be a passwordless secure scalable 2FA system for the web. However, the webauthn standard only specifies how the protocol works when the browser communicates with the remote website, there’s a different standard called FIDO or U2F that specifies how the browser communicates with the second factor (called an authenticator in FIDO speak) and how that second factor works.

It turns out that the FIDO standards do specify a TPM as one possible backend, so what, you might ask does this have to do with the Linux Gadget subsystem? The answer, it turns out, is that although the standards do recommend a TPM as the second factor, they don’t specify how to connect to one. The only connection protocols in the Client To Authenticator Protocol (CTAP) specifications are USB, BLE and NFC. And, in fact, the only one that’s really widely implemented in browsers is USB, so if you want to connect your laptop’s TPM to a browser it’s going to have to go over USB meaning you need a Linux USB gadget. Conspiracy theorists will obviously notice that if the main current connector is USB and FIDO requires new USB tokens because it’s a new standard then webauthn is a boon to token manufacturers.

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OpenStreetMap and Deborah Nicholson win 2019 FSF Awards

Filed under
GNU

This year the FSF awarded OpenStreetMap and the award was accepted by Kate Chapman, chairperson of the OpenStreetMap Foundation and co-founder of the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT).

OpenStreetMap is a collaborative project to create a free editable map of the world. Founded by Steve Coast in the UK in 2004, OpenStreetMap is built by a community of over one million community members and has found its application on thousands of Web sites, mobile apps, and hardware devices. OpenStreetMap is the only truly global service without restrictions on use or availability of map information.

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RPi Zero W based robot kits offer pan-tilt cam, GPS, and ToF sensing

Filed under
Linux

The $120 to $165 “SparkFun Autonomous Kit for Sphero RVR” extends the $250 Sphero RVR robot with an Raspberry Pi Zero W, a pan-tilt camera, GPS, and an optional ToF distance sensor.

SparkFun Electronics recently completed a successful Kickstarter project for its Sphero RVR, a four-wheeled tank-treaded robot that offers optional programming via a Raspberry Pi, Arduino, or BBC micro:bit. The robot is now publicly available for pre-order at $250 and SparkFun has announced two SparkFun Autonomous Kits for the Sphero RVR that add pan-tilt camera and location capabilities to the robot based on a Raspberry Pi Zero W.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Updating a group of packages on Gentoo
  • Men Of War Guide
  • Falkon 3.1.0 released

    New Falkon version is now out.

  • Xilinx Moving Ahead With Plans To Upstream Their Alveo PCIe Accelerator Driver

    A few weeks back I wrote about Xilinx looking at contributing their Alveo FPGA accelerator drivers to the mainline Linux kernel. They are continuing to work on that goal and pushed out their latest kernel driver patches this week for these Alveo PCIe accelerator cards. 

    The Xilinx Alveo PCIe accelerator driver for Linux is already used in production by customers albeit now the company is comfortable with the idea of upstreaming the work into the mainline kernel. These accelerators can ultimately run C/C++/OpenCL using their specialty compiler or programmed using RTL. Xilinx Alveo is marketed for machine learning, video transcoding/processing, genomics, financial computations, database searching, and related big data fields.

  • Fabian Affolter: Chemnitzer Linux Tage 2019

    Once again, Robert and I went to Chemnitz. We don’t wanted to break with the tradition of having a Fedora Project booth at the Chemnitzer Linux Tage. Robert is representing the Fedora Project at CLT for over a decade now.

    To show the visitors a running Fedora installation Raphael decided to take a larger screen, mounted it on a stand and placed a Raspberry Pi behind it. Pretty straight-forward setup but there is always an issue with the VESA connection on the back of the screen.

  •  

(OSS) Web Project Management Software and OSI

Filed under
OSS
  • 10 Excellent Web Project Management Software

    Project management is the application of processes, methods, knowledge, skills and experience to achieve the project objectives. Project management tools encompass many different types of software such as scheduling, resource allocation, collaboration software, quality management, and cost control / budget management. This type of software is typically used by project managers looking to plan and control resources, costs and schedules to meet the objectives of a project.

    It can be very satisfying planning and delivering projects on time. One of the methods that has always helped me is PRINCE2, a de facto process-based method for effective project management. But project management software is equally as important to the success of a project.

    There are a number of different types of project management tools. One of the industry standards is the Gantt Chart, which provides a graphical displays of all the tasks that a project is composed of. Each bar on the chart is a graphical representation of the length of time the task is planned to take. Other popular tools include PERT charts (a method for analyzing the tasks involved in completing a project), Product Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of components that make up a project deliverable), and Work Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of deliverables and tasks that need to be performed to complete a project).

    To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 10 excellent web based project management software. Hopefully, there will be something of interest for anyone who wishes to organise their projects. Here’s our rating chart.

  • New Open Source Initiative Sponsors Emphasize Diverse/Broad Industry Adoption [Ed: In fact, so diverse that even companies that attack Open Source are in the Board and are sponsors, e.g. Microsoft]

    Today the Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the global non-profit formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, is pleased to announce the corporate sponsorship of Daily Fantasy Cafe and Lineups.com. The contributions from these diverse companies underscore the broad appeal and applicability of open source software across industries.

    Over 20 years of work, the OSI has constantly found adoption of, and contributions to, open source software growing, year over year, as companies realize the benefits and value of collaborative communities of practice. No longer limited to the data centers and development shops of tech-companies, open source software is now pervasive across diverse industries, all seeking to reduce costs, drive innovation, decrease time to market, increase quality, and avoid vendor lock-in.

    “The OSI is actively engaged with organizations across government, education, manufacturing, agriculture, entertainment—everywhere.  As new industries emerge, like fantasy sports, they’re choosing to be, ‘open source first,’” says Patrick Masson, General Manager of the Open Source Initiative. “Daily Fantasy Cafe and Lineups really show how broad the appeal is now, and most inspiring, how companies that benefit from open source choose to contribute back. Open source is a collaborative effort, projects need code, community, and cash.”

Security: Cryptocurrency Fears and New Browser Holes

Filed under
Security

Graphics: FreeSync, Primus-VK, NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • More AMD FreeSync Patches Likely Coming To Linux 5.2

    While the Linux 5.0 kernel brought initial support for the long-awaited open-source FreeSync implementation, the Linux 5.2 kernel coming out this summer will likely have additional improvements. 

    Open-source developer Mario Kleiner has been working on a set of patches this month for enabling proper vblank and page-flip time-stamping when in the FreeSync/VRR (Variable Rate Refresh) mode. This work makes the vblank timestamps as accurate as in the fixed refresh rate behavior. 

  • Primus-VK: PRIME-Style GPU Offloading For Vulkan

    For those with a PRIME style notebook or just making use of dual/multiple graphics processors in your system, Primus-VK allows for using a secondary/dedicated GPU for rendering while driving the display from the alternative (often integrated graphics) GPU. Primus-VK is implemented as a Vulkan layer as a clean approach for dealing with multiple GPUs in a Vulkan world. 

    Primus-VK pursues Vulkan GPU offloading by implementing this logic as a Vulkan layer for handling the rendering on one GPU and then when it comes to display-time it copies the image over to the integrated/primary GPU. This layer can be installed per-user or system-wide and has been tested on the likes of Debian. ENABLE_OPTIMUS_LAYER=1 is the environment variable used for activating the behavior. Primus-VK has also been tested with Windows games under Wine.

  • NVIDIA Releases Nsight Graphics 2019.2 With Vulkan Profiling Support

    Released for GDC/GTC week was Nsight Graphics 2019.2, the proprietary cross-platform, closed-source utility tool for debugging, profiling, and analyzing Direct3D, OpenGL, and other GPU-accelerated APIs. 

    With this week's Nsight Graphics 2019.2 release they finally have added Vulkan profiling support. This support allows inspecting GPU performance metrics under Vulkan workloads within the program's Range Profiler. Other new additions include improvements for running Steam games on Linux, a feedback button, and enhancements to the accelerated structure viewer and API inspector.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development

21+ Linux Camera Software: IP, Webcam, CCTV & Security Camera Software

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Linux is a strong open source platform where every type of necessary software tools are available for both the beginners and professionals. If you are in confusion about which camera software or IP camera software to use in your Linux system, then I can only say that there are lots of IP, security or surveillance camera software available for Linux system. For helping you to sort out, today I am going to provide a list of Linux camera software where various kinds of webcam software, IP camera software, security camera software, and video surveillance software are included with focusing on various important features.

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Security: Updates, VPN, BleachBit, TenFourFox and Steam

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Linux apps on Chrome OS will soon support Android-based VPN connections

    Google is finally fixing Chrome OS's inability to protect Linux apps with a VPN, like the ones downloadable from the Play Store.

  • BleachBit 2.2

    Designed for Linux and Windows systems, it wipes clean thousands of applications including Firefox, Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, and more. Beyond simply deleting files, BleachBit includes advanced features such as shredding files to prevent recovery, wiping free disk space to hide traces of files deleted by other applications, and vacuuming Firefox to make it faster. Better than free, BleachBit is open source.

  • Stand by for urgent security update

    Pwn2Own came and went and Firefox fell with it. The __proto__ vulnerability seems exploitable in TenFourFox, though it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be fully weaponized, and I'm currently evaluating the other bug. Builds ("FPR13 SPR1") including fixes for either or both depending on my conclusions will be issued within the next couple days.

  • Steam vulnerability exposed users to account hijacking and malware [Ed: proprietary software cannot hide its holes for very long (or until it's too late to hide)]

Graphics: Vulkan in OpenArena and GDC 2019 Week

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • vkOpenArena: The ioquake3-Powered OpenArena Game Gets Ported To Vulkan

    OpenArena, one of the most well known open-source games built atop the ioquake3 engine of what started out as id Tech 3, has now seen an independent port to the Vulkan graphics API.

    The vkOpenArena game now marks the latest vintage game seeing a port to Vulkan. Independent developer Sui Jingfeng has been working on vkOpenArena as a port of the OpenArena engine over to using the Vulkan graphics API rather than Vulkan.

  • AMDVLK Has A Small Weekly Code Push For GDC 2019 Week

    With many AMD driver developers being over in San Francisco for the Game Developers Conference, this week AMDVLK saw rather small changes for this open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver.

Servers: Kubernetes, Docker, and Software Defined Infrastructure

Filed under
Server
  • Kubernetes End-to-end Testing for Everyone

    More and more components that used to be part of Kubernetes are now being developed outside of Kubernetes. For example, storage drivers used to be compiled into Kubernetes binaries, then were moved into stand-alone Flexvolume binaries on the host, and now are delivered as Container Storage Interface (CSI) drivers that get deployed in pods inside the Kubernetes cluster itself.

    This poses a challenge for developers who work on such components: how can end-to-end (E2E) testing on a Kubernetes cluster be done for such external components? The E2E framework that is used for testing Kubernetes itself has all the necessary functionality. However, trying to use it outside of Kubernetes was difficult and only possible by carefully selecting the right versions of a large number of dependencies. E2E testing has become a lot simpler in Kubernetes 1.13.

  • Why Docker Containers Matter, 6 Years After the Project First Started

    Docker, the eponymous name of the container technology and the company behind it, celebrated its six-year anniversary on March 20. From its earliest days, even as just a 1-year-old effort back in 2014, there was no shortage of optimism and excitement about Docker. With the Docker model, applications are more portable and run inside of containers, which are isolated instances that provide a more agile approach for development and deployment. Docker also introduced the "dockerfile" packaging format, which defines how a container image should be built.

    The container model that Docker first introduced has evolved over the past six years and is now the cornerstone of the broader cloud-native space, which includes the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In this eWEEK Data Points article, we look at some of the key facts about Docker and the cloud-native revolution it has inspired.

  • Planning for a Software Defined Infrastructure

    Seems you can’t pick up an IT magazine these days without hearing the term software defined infrastructure. It’s easy to get caught up in the hype. You might be thinking ‘people are talking about so it must be something that we need.” Some of you are wincing from the pain felt in trying to adopt the latest technologies without properly looking at what will work for your environment and business.

    In a software defined world, the computing infrastructure is virtualized. That is, it is delivered as a service. Management and control of the networking, storage and/or data center infrastructure is automated by intelligent software rather than by the hardware components of the infrastructure.

Events: SREcon19 Americas, Scale, FudCon and Snapcraft Summit Montreal

Filed under
OSS
  • SREcon19 Americas Talk Resources

    At SREcon19 Americas, I gave a talk called "Operating within Normal Parameters: Monitoring Kubernetes". Here's some links and resources related to my talk, for your reference.

  • Participating at #Scale17x

    Everytime somebody asks me about Scale I can only think of the same: Scale is the most important community lead conference in North America and it only gets better by the years. This year it celebrated its seventeenth edition and it just struck me: with me being there this year, there have been more Scales I have attended than I have not. This is my nineth conference out of 17.

    The first time that I attended it was 2011, it was the edition followed by FudCon Tempe 2010 which happened to be my first Fedora conference and it was also the first time I got to meet some contributors that I had previously collaborated with, many of which I still consider my brothers.

    As for this time, I almost didn’t make it as my visa renewal was resolved on Friday’s noon, one day after the conference started. I recovered it that same day and book a flight in the night. I couldn’t find anything to LAX -as I regularly fly- so I had to fly to Tijuana and from there I borrowed a cart to Pasadena. Long story short: I arrived around 1:30 AM on Saturday.

  • Snapcraft Summit Montreal

    Snapcraft is the universal app store for Linux that reaches millions of users and devices and serves millions of app installs a month.

    The Snapcraft Summit is a forward-thinking software workshop attended by major software vendors, community contributors and Snapcraft engineers working at every level of the stack.

Draw On Your Screen with this Neat GNOME Shell Extension

Filed under
GNOME

Ever wish you could draw on the Linux desktop or write on the screen?

Well, there’s a new GNOME Shell extension that lets you do exactly that: draw on the Linux desktop.

You may want to point out a bug, highlight a feature, or provide some guidance to someone else by sending them an annotated screenshot.

In this short post we’ll show you how to install the add-on and how to use it.

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Fedora 31 Preparing To Start Removing Packages Depending Upon Python 2

Filed under
Red Hat

Python 2 support will formally reach end-of-life on 1 January 2020 and Fedora 31 is preparing for that by working to drop packages (or parts of packages) that depend upon Python 2.

Fedora has been pushing for a Python 2 to Python 3 migration for many cycles now -- as most Linux distributions have -- while with Fedora 31 they are planning a "mass Python 2 package removal" if necessary. They are planning to closely track the state of packages depending upon Python 2 to either drop the packages or allow packagers to easily abandon Python 2 parts of programs.

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A preliminary review of /e/

Filed under
OS
Android

I’ve been running LineageOS on my phone for a while now (and cyanogenmod before that) and been reasonably happy overall. Still even LineageOS is pretty intertwined with the google ecosystem and worries me, especially given that google is first and foremost an ad company.
I happened to run accross mention of /e/ somewhere and since LineageOS did a jump from being based on ASOP15 to ASOP16 which required a new install anyhow, I decided to check it out.
As you may have gathered from the above, /e/ is a phone OS and platform, forked off from LineageOS14.1. It’s located at https://e.foundation based in france (a non profit) headed by Gaël Duval, who Linux folks may know from his Mandrake/Mandriva days. The foundation has a lot of noble goals, starting with “/e/’s first mission is to provide everyone knowledge and good practices around personal data and privacy.” They also have a slogan “Your data is your data!”
I downloaded and installed a 0.5 version here. Since I already had my phone unlocked and TWRP recovery setup, I just backed up my existing LineageOS install (to my laptop), wiped the phone and installed /e/. The install was painless and since (of course) there’s no google connections wanted, I didn’t even have to download a gapps bundle. The install worked just fine and I was off and exploring:

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Tests Of The QNINE M.2 NVMe SSD Enclosure To USB-C Adapter

In the past few months a number of M.2 NVMe SSD to USB adapters have been appearing on the market. Curious about the performance potential on Linux of an NVMe SSD drive attached to a USB 3.1 connection, I recently picked up a QNINE NVMe solid-state drive enclosure for benchmarking. The QNINE NVMe SSD enclosure is an M.2 NVMe to USB-C/USB-3.1 adapter that retails for about $40 USD from the likes of Amazon. Only Windows and macOS support is mentioned, but the drive was detected just fine and working under Linux. This QNINE adapter is just one of many M.2 NVMe to USB-C adapters on the market and most in the $40~60 USD price range. Read more

Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available

The new software release, Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available! This time, the name for Sailfish OS 3.0.2 update was inspired by one of our sailor’s favorite locations: Oulanka National Park. Oulanka is a national park in Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia regions of Finland, covering 270 km². This park is known in Finland by adventurers due to it is famous trekking route, Karhunkierros, a four day – eighty kilometer route – located in Oulanka and accessible all year round. Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks to become part of World Wide Fund for Nature’s PAN Parks. Read more

Games: Google Stadia, Forge and Fight, Relic Hunters Legend, Port Valley

  • Google Stadia Gaming Platform Needs Min 25Mb/s Internet Speed
    Google has released the specifications of its upcoming game streaming platform known as Google Stadia. The game streaming platform from the tech giant will use custom made processor and an ultra-fast graphics card in its forthcoming console. While the CPU will be a 2.7GHz x86 custom-made chip with hyper-threading and 9.5 MB L2+L2 cache, AMD will handle the graphical duties with a 10.7 Teraflops GPU with 56 compute units and HMB2 memory. Stadia machine will have 16GB of RAM along with 484GB/s of high transfer speed. Additionally, an SSD will be used for maximum performance to increase the load-time.
  • Forge and Fight might be the most hilarious prototype I've played recently
    Always keen to see what new types of experiences developers are looking to offer, I often try out game prototypes. Forge and Fight is one where you make your own weapon and it's pretty amusing. Since it's a prototype, it's obviously quite basic. However the promise with this one is very clear! Pick a handle and then basically stick anything on it and swing it around at your enemies! How about a fancy looking sword? Sure you could do that—or you could swing around multiple Scythes attached by a chain link with a flamethrower, a couple of spike balls and a boxing glove because why the hell not.
  • The shoot and loot RPG 'Relic Hunters Legend' is looking good in the latest trailer
    ...it's coming to Linux and certainly still seems to be that way as the trailer even has the Linux "tux" logo included and the current FAQ clearly mentions Linux as a platform...
  • Port Valley, a "not so classic" point & click adventure now has a Linux demo
    From developer WrongPixel, Port Valley is an in development point & click adventure that's "not so" classic apparently. Honestly, I had never heard of this before or at least I don't remember hearing about it at all. Turns out a few days ago it gained a Linux demo and it does seem to work quite nicely. Seems like a very interesting point and click game, one the developer said is only aiming to borrow some mechanics from the past while showing the genre "still has a lot to say".

7 Great XFCE Themes for Linux

Gnome might be the de-facto default desktop for many Linux distributions, but that doesn’t mean it’s everyone’s favorite. For many Linux users that distinction goes to XFCE. While it’s not as lightweight as it used to be, XFCE remains a favorite among users who want their desktop environment to stay out of their way. Just because you want a relatively minimal desktop doesn’t mean you want it to be ugly. Looking to spice up the look of your XFCE installation? You have plenty of options. Read more