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Sunday, 22 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Games: Valve, Hot Lava, Drawn Down Abyss and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games

    Valve and game developers have a bit of a fight on their hands here, with a French court ruling that Valve should allow users to re-sell their digital games.

    Reported by the French website Next Inpact, the French consumers group UFC Que Choisir had a victory against Valve as French courts have ruled against them on the topic of reselling digital content. From what I've read and tried to understand, the courts have basically said that when you buy something on Steam it is indeed a proper purchase and not a subscription.

    Valve has been ordered to pay damages at €20K plus €10K to cover some costs. On top of that, they will also have to publish the judgement on Steam's home page (presumably only for users in France) and for it to remain visible for three months. If they don't, they will get a fine for each day of €3K. To Valve though, that's likely pocket change. The bigger issue though, is how other countries inside and outside the EU could follow it.

  • Hot Lava from Klei Entertainment is in the works for Linux

    Just recently Klei Entertainment (Don't Starve, Oxygen Not Included) released their amusing parkour game Hot Lava and it's not only planned for Linux they're actually working on it.

    It looks and sounds like a ridiculous amount of fun too, a 3D platformer inspired by the classic kids game. I'm sure everyone has played it at some point in their lives. Get a bunch of pillows and cushions, throw them around and don't touch the floor! Klei managed to turn that into a pretty good looking game PC game.

  • Post-apocalyptic road-trip strategy game Overland has officially released, some thoughts

    After a few years in Early Access on itch.io, Finji have officially released their post-apocalyptic road-trip strategy game Overland.

  • Dota 2 is going through multiple big ban waves and some matchmaking changes

    Valve are trying to clean up the Dota 2 community and make matchmaking better, with some big changes being done.

    First up, let's talk a little about the recent major ban waves. Valve said they have removed players from Dota 2 with "exceptionally low behavior scores" and they will continue to do so regularly, which is good and very much needed to keep the online community healthy. They have also done a second ban wave for anyone who has been "detected of violating the Steam Service Agreement that prevents the purchase or sale of Steam accounts"—ouch. A third wave happened, to remove players who've been using "exploits to gain an advantage over other players" and they will be adjusting how they detect such things over the coming weeks.

    Not only that, bans will also now block the phone number associated with the account permanently, so people will have to setup a new phone making it more difficult for nuisance players to come right back. Linking directly with that, Valve said they closed a hole that allowed "a large number of users to play ranked without a unique phone number attached" to help against smurf accounts. On top of all that again, to gain access to Ranked play you need to have 100 hours logged in the game.

  • Drawn Down Abyss takes an action platformer and adds in card deck-building for abilities

    Platformers are probably the most common type of game available on any platform and yet, some developers are still able to make them seem a little unique.

    Drawn Down Abyss is one such game, a pixel art action-focused platformer. The difference here, is they're pulling in the card-based deck-building for your abilities. Deck-building is massively popular right now, it's one of those things that one or two games did really well and now more want to try it. I'm happy about this, I'm a fan of collecting cards and using them to battle with so trying it out with an action platformer has piqued my interest.

  • Top-down racer Bloody Rally Show looks great in the new trailer

    One racing game I am genuinely excited about is Bloody Rally Show, a top-down racer that looks genuinely good and it has a fresh trailer up to show off recent development progress.

    It will fully supported Linux too, as I tested out previously. One of the reasons I'm excited about this, is that it firmly reminds me of some classic early racers from the Amiga only with everything turned up a notch or two. Not only that, something of a rarity in racing games is that it will have a fully featured campaign story mode with cut-scenes and all. This campaign mode can even be played in local co-op.

OpenZFS Could Soon See Much Better Deduplication Support

Filed under
Linux

This is good news for OpenZFS performance assuming the dedup support is punctually opened up and is an acceptable state for quickly landing in this ZFS file-system code used by Linux with "ZFS On Linux" and in the process of by the likes of FreeBSD.

The ZFS file-system has supported data deduplication for the past decade. However, it's not widely recommended due to being very heavy on RAM usage as well as relatively taxing on the CPU, so it will be interesting to see just how effective is the Panzura implementation.

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today's howtos and programming leftovers

Filed under
Development
HowTos

Become A Linux Foundation Certified Sysadmin

Filed under
News

The Linux Foundation is offering beginner sysadmin and advanced sysadmin training and certification bundle at more than 65% off. You have better career prospect as a certified Linux professional.
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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack and Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • LHS Episode #302: The End of Kenwood

    Welcome to Episode 302 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short topic episode, the hosts discuss the potential end of Kenwood in the amateur radio market, emcom in Montucky, Storm Area 51, HF on satellites, a huge update for PulseAudio, the Linux 5.3 kernel and much more. Thank you for listening and have a fantastic week.

  • 09/19/2019 | Linux Headlines

    Fresh init system controversy at the Debian project, a more scalable Samba, and a big release for LLVM.

    Plus GitHub's latest security steps and a new version of OBS Studio.

When Diverse Network ASICs Meet A Unifying Operating System

Filed under
OS

And it has also been a decade since switch upstart Arista Networks launched its Extensible Operating System, or EOS, which is derived from Linux.

[...]

The cross-platform nature of ArcOS, coupled with its ability to run in any function on the network, could turn out to be the key differentiator. A lot of these other NOSes were point solutions that could only be deployed in certain parts of the network, and that just creates animosity with the incumbent vendors that dominate the rest of the networking stack. Given the mission-critical nature of networking in the modern datacenter, it costs a great deal to qualify a new network operating system, and it can take a lot of time. If ArcOS can run across more platforms, qualify faster, and do more jobs in the network, then, says Garg, it has a good chance of shaking up switching and routing. “That totally changes the business conversation and the TCO advantages that we can bring to a customer across the entirety of their network.”

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Server: Kubernetes/OpenShift, OpenStack, and Red Hat's Ansible

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • 9 steps to awesome with Kubernetes/OpenShift presented by Burr Sutter

    Burr Sutter gave a terrific talk in India in July, where he laid out the terms, systems and processes needed to setup Kubernetes for developers. This is an introductory presentation, which may be useful for your larger community of Kubernetes users once you’ve already setup User Provisioned Infrastructure (UPI) in Red Hat OpenShift for them, though it does go into the deeper details of actually running the a cluster. To follow along, Burr created an accompanying GitHub repository, so you too can learn how to setup an awesome Kubernetes cluster in just 9 steps.

  • Weaveworks Named a Top Kubernetes Contributor

    But anyone who knows the history of Weaveworks might not be too surprised by this. Weaveworks has been a major champion of Kubernetes since the very beginning. It might not be too much of a coincidence that Weaveworks was incorporated only a few weeks after Kubernetes was open sourced, five years ago. In addition to this, the very first elected chair of the CNCF’s Technical Oversight Committee, responsible for technical leadership to the Cloud Native Foundation was also headed up by our CEO, Alexis Richardson(@monadic) (soon to be replaced by the awesome Liz Rice (@lizrice) of Aqua Security).

  • Improving trust in the cloud with OpenStack and AMD SEV

    This post contains an exciting announcement, but first I need to provide some context!

    Ever heard that joke “the cloud is just someone else’s computer”?

    Of course it’s a gross over-simplification, but there’s more than a grain of truth in it. And that raises the question: if your applications are running in someone else’s data-centre, how can you trust that they’re not being snooped upon, or worse, invasively tampered with?

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 Enhances Infrastructure Security and Cloud-Native Integration Across the Open Hybrid Cloud

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, the latest version of its highly scalable and agile cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) solution. Based on the OpenStack community’s "Stein" release, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15 adds performance and cloud security enhancements and expands the platform’s ecosystem of supported hardware, helping IT organizations to more quickly and more securely support demanding production workloads. Given the role of Linux as the foundation for hybrid cloud, customers can also benefit from a more secure, flexible and intelligent Linux operating system underpinning their private cloud deployments with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

  • Red Hat Ansible Automation Accelerates Past Major Adoption Milestone, Now Manages More Than Four Million Customer Systems Worldwide

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that more than four million customer systems worldwide are now automated by Red Hat Ansible Automation. Customers, including Energy Market Company, Microsoft, Reserve Bank of New Zealand and Surescripts all use Red Hat Ansible Automation to automate and orchestrate their IT operations, helping to expand automation across IT stacks.

    According to a blog post by Chris Gardner with Forrester Research, who was the author of The Forrester Wave™: Infrastructure Automation Platforms, Q3 2019, "Infrastructure automation isn’t just on-premises or the cloud. It’s at the edge and everywhere in between."1 Since its launch in 2013, Red Hat Ansible Automation has provided a single tool to help organizations automate across IT operations and development, including infrastructure, networks, cloud, security and beyond.

Top 15+ Best Script Writing Software for Linux in 2019

Filed under
Software

Script writing software is designed to play a vital role for writers from different writing sectors. As a newbie, it may not be simple to use. But, after a certain period, it comes handy for creating scripts for films, novels, and television programs. Linux has to offer a bunch of tools for script writing for both beginners and professionals. There is a wide range of applications that are open source and free. Moreover, if you want to get some extra bit of advanced features, you may need to spend some bucks.

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Programming: Python, Node.js and LLVM

Filed under
Development
  • uwsgi weirdness with --http

    Instead of upgrading everything on my server, I'm just starting from scratch. From Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 19.04 and I also upgraded everything else in sight. One of them was uwsgi. I copied various user config files but for uwsgi things didn't very well. On the old server I had uwsgi version 2.0.12-debian and on the new one 2.0.18-debian. The uWSGI changelog is pretty hard to read but I sure don't see any mention of this.

  • Wingware Blog: Viewing Arrays and Data Frames in Wing Pro 7

    Wing Pro 7 introduced an array and data frame viewer that can be used to inspect data objects in the debugger. Values are transferred to the IDE according to what portion of the data is visible on the screen, so working with large data sets won't slow down the IDE.

    The array viewer works with Pandas, numpy, sqlite3, xarray, Python's builtin lists, tuples, and dicts, and other classes that emulate lists, tuples, or dicts.

  • Solving Sequence Problems with LSTM in Keras: Part 2

    This is the second and final part of the two-part series of articles on solving sequence problems with LSTMs. In the part 1 of the series, I explained how to solve one-to-one and many-to-one sequence problems using LSTM. In this part, you will see how to solve one-to-many and many-to-many sequence problems via LSTM in Keras.

    Image captioning is a classic example of one-to-many sequence problems where you have a single image as input and you have to predict the image description in the form of a word sequence. Similarly, stock market prediction for the next X days, where input is the stock price of the previous Y days, is a classic example of many-to-many sequence problems.

    In this article you will see very basic examples of one-to-many and many-to-many problems. However, the concepts learned in this article will lay the foundation for solving advanced sequence problems, such as stock price prediction and automated image captioning that we will see in the upcoming articles.

  • Voronoi Mandalas

    I started with Carlos Focil's mandalapy code, modifying the parameters until I had a design I liked. I decided to make the Voronoi diagram show both points and vertices, and I gave it an equal aspect ratio. Carlos' mandalapy code is a port of Antonio Sánchez Chinchón's inspiring work drawing mandalas with R, using the deldir library to plot Voronoi tesselations.

  • Python Code Kata: Fizzbuzz

    A code kata is a fun way for computer programmers to practice coding. They are also used a lot for learning how to implement Test Driven Development (TDD) when writing code. One of the popular programming katas is called FizzBuzz. This is also a popular interview question for computer programmers.

  • why python is the best-suited programming language machine learning

    Machine Learning is the hottest trend in modern times. According to Forbes, Machine learning patents grew at a 34% rate between 2013 and 2017 and this is only set to increase in the future. And Python is the primary programming language used for much of the research and development in Machine Learning. So much so that Python is the top programming language for Machine Learning according to Github.

    Python is currently the most popular programming language for research and development in Machine Learning. But you don’t need to take my word for it! According to Google Trends, the interest in Python for Machine Learning has spiked to an all-new high with other ML languages such as R, Java, Scala, Julia, etc. lagging far behind.

  • Node.js now available in Haiku

    As some have already known for a long time, many platforms have had support for writing software in JavaScript or TypeScript with the help of the Node.js runtime and over the years, much of the software written by developers these days have gradually been written in either of those languages. However, Haiku has lacked a Node.js port for quite sometime and it wasn’t possible to run or develop JavaScript based software or libraries that depended on the Node.js runtime. Now I can say that Node.js is available for Haiku and can be downloaded from HaikuDepot on 64 bit (32 bit support is being worked on). The version which is currently available is 12.3.1 and is already being updated to the latest version at the time of this writing to 12.10.0 and support for the upcoming LTS version is also coming to HaikuPorts. Several patches have been upstreamed by members of the HaikuPorts team to projects such as libuv (cross-platform async I/O library), GN, etc and we hope to upstream to larger projects like V8 (Google’s JavaScript engine used in Chromium and QtWebEngine) and the Node.js project, which will ease the bringup of a future Node LTS release for Haiku.

  • Node.js Brought To BeOS-Inspired Haiku Open-Source OS

    Haiku as the open-source operating system that still maintains BeOS compatibility continues tacking on modern features and support for software well past the days of BeOS.

    The newest major piece of software working on BeOS is Node.js, including support for its NPM package manager.

  • LLVM 9.0 Released With Ability To Build The Linux x86_64 Kernel, Experimental OpenCL C++

    It's coming almost one month behind schedule, but LLVM 9.0 is out today along with the Clang 9.0 C/C++ compiler and associated sub-projects for this open-source compiler infrastructure.

    LLVM 9.0 is an exciting release with bringing the ability to build the mainline Linux x86_64 kernel using LLVM/Clang 9.0 now that "asm goto" support was finally added. The AArch64 support was in better standing previously but now at long last the mainline Clang 9.0 compiler can build the current Linux kernel releases with not needing any extra patches on either side, just point the kernel build CC to Clang.

Linux 5.4 Development, PRs, Merges

Filed under
Linux
  • BLK-IOCOST Merged For Linux 5.4 To Better Account For Cost Of I/O Workloads

    BLK-IOCOST is a new I/O controller by veteran kernel developer Tejun Heo that is a work-conserving proportional controller. He goes over blk-iocost in great detail in one of the earlier patch series, "It currently has a simple linear cost model builtin where each IO is classified as sequential or random and given a base cost accordingly and additional size-proportional cost is added on top. Each IO is given a cost based on the model and the controller issues IOs for each cgroup according to their hierarchical weight. By default, the controller adapts its overall IO rate so that it doesn't build up buffer bloat in the request_queue layer, which guarantees that the controller doesn't lose significant amount of total work...The controller provides extra QoS control knobs which allow tightening control feedback loop as necessary." See that aforelinked article for more details and results.

  • Btrfs & XFS File-Systems See More Fixes With Linux 5.4

    The mature XFS and Btrfs file-systems continue seeing more fixes and cleaning with the now in-development Linux 5.4 kernel.

    On the Btrfs front the Linux 5.4 changes are summed up as "work on code refactoring, sanity checks and space handling. There are some less user visible changes, nothing that would particularly stand out." The Btrfs changes include deprecating a few items as well as improving the exposure of debugging information via sysfs. See the pull request for all the Btrfs file-system fixes and changes this round.

  • Linux 5.4 DRM Pull Submitted With AMD Navi 12/14, Arcturus & Renoir Plus Intel Tigerlake

    While we've known about the many features for a while if you are a faithful Phoronix reader, today the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) graphics driver changes were sent in for the Linux 5.4 kernel.

Spartan Edge Accelerator Arduino Compatible Board Combines ESP32 & Spartan-7 FPGA

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Xilinx Spartan FPGAs have been around for a while, and a few years ago we covered Spartan-6 FPGA boards such as Spartixed and miniSpartan6+.

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Fedora: rpminspect, Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day, Cockpit 203 and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • rpminspect-0.6 released with new inspections and bug fixes

    This release also includes a lot of bug fixes. I really appreciate all of the feedback users have been providing. It is really helping round out the different inspections and ensure it works across all types of builds.

    For details on what is new in rpminspect-0.6, see the release page.

  • Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day 2019-09-23

    Monday 2019-09-23, is the Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day! As part of preparing for the final release of Fedora 31, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 203

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 203.

  • Attention: Fedora Yahoo Email Users

    Going from a blast of the past we are currently going through one of the Yahoo is not allowing many emails with either fedoraproject.org OR from our mail routers. It would seem that the way to get yahoo to blacklist a domain is to get subscribed to mailing lists and then report the lists as SPAM. Enough accounts (or maybe if one person does it enough times).. yahoo will helpfully blacklist the domain completely. [It then is usually a multi-month process of people explaining that no Fedora is not a spam site, hasn't been taken over by a spam site, or a bunch of other things which do happen so any mail admin is going to be wary on.]

SMARC carrier board and design service supports six modules

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

MSC announced a compact SimpleFlex carrier board and custom manufacturing service that supports six MSC SMARC 2.0 modules with i.MX8, i.MX8M. i.MX8M Mini. i.MX6, Intel Apollo Lake, and Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+.

In 2016, Avnet-owned MSC Technologies announced a 148 x 102mm carrier board form-factor and manufacturing service called SimpleFlex with an initial MSC Q7-MB-EP5 product designed for its Qseven modules. Now, it has announced a smaller, 146 x 80mm MSC SM2S-MB-EP5 version for MSC SMARC 2.0 “short” modules. The new board adds a USB Type-C port with DisplayPort along with an M.2 M-key slot for storage.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • FAI 5.8.7 and new ISO images using Debian 10

    The new FAI release 5.8.7 now supports apt keys in files called package_config/CLASS.gpg. Before we only supported .asc files. fai-mirror has a new option -V, which checks if variables are used in package_config/ and uses variable definitions from class/.var.

  • Video recap: LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain

    Here’s a quick recap of the LibreOffice Conference 2019 that took place last week in Almeria, Spain! Over the next couple of weeks, we’ll also upload videos from the individual presentations…

German ministry hellbent on taking back control of 'digital sovereignty', cutting dependency on Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

The Federal Ministry of the Interior (Bundesministerium des Innern or BMI) in Germany says it will reduce reliance on specific IT suppliers, especially Microsoft, in order to strengthen its "digital sovereignty".

In an official statement, the Federal Minister of the Interior Horst Seehofer states that “in order to ensure our digital sovereignty, we want to reduce dependencies on individual IT providers. We are also considering alternative programs to replace certain software. This will be done in close coordination with other EU countries.”

BMI commissioned a strategic market analysis from consultants PwC, resulting in a paper that was published last month. The paper examines the risks inherent in IT dependency on commercial software vendors, with a particular focus on Microsoft because of the heavy use of its products and the way they are interconnected, especially Microsoft Office, Windows, Windows Server and Office 365.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games Leftovers

Databases: Percona and InfluxDB

Finance/Funding and FOSS

  • Poloniex continues to support open-source development; donates to Grin General Fund

    Released in January 2019, privacy-focused cryptocurrency Grin was previously in the news for its hard fork in July 2019. The hard fork in question, focused on maximizing miner decentralization and usability. The cryptocurrency has been solely reliant on crowdfunding and previously in March 2019, the coin received an anonymous donation of 50 BTC. But, the aspect that makes this privacy-focused cryptocurrency stand out is its involvement with Mimblewimble. Grin is the first application on the Mimblewimble protocol, which was created to bolster the scalability and privacy of digital assets. Litecoin’s Charlie Lee has been steering the silver coin towards Mimblewimble, going on to hire a developer from Grin to explore Litecoin’s capabilities with the protocol.

  • Square Crypto Hires Lightning, Libra Developers for ‘Bitcoin Dream Team’

    Square Crypto, the division of the publicly traded payments company that focuses exclusively on bitcoin, just announced three new hires to work on open source projects.

  • Open Source Bitcoin Payment Processor Receives a Grant From Square Crypto

    Bringing cryptocurrency payments to a larger audience is no easy feat. Many companies are trying to do so, albeit to little or no avail. Square Crypto, the branch of Square, which focuses on the cryptocurrency industry, is trying to change that aspect. Their recent investment in BTCPay Server shows there may be a bright future ahead for crypto payments on a global scale.

  • MyHbarWallet launches the first browser-based, open source wallet for hbars

    Today, MyHbarWallet.com launched, and is excited to support the Hedera™ Hashgraph community. Out of the box, users can initiate the account creation process, load existing accounts, and create accounts on behalf of requestors. MyHbarWallet was influenced by MyEtherWallet (MEW), the top wallet for the Ethereum blockchain. We wanted to make the experience of using Hedera familiar for those who are already active in the cryptocurrency space. The team behind MyHbarWallet is the same core team actively contributing to the open source Hedera software development kits (SDK). MyHbarWallet was built using Vue.js.

  • Tidelift and the Python Software Foundation partner to support widely used Python web development libraries

    The Python Software Foundation and Tidelift today announced a partnership to support the community-driven Pallets Projects, a collection of Python web development libraries downloaded millions of times each month. Tidelift now provides recurring income to the team of developers behind these vitally important open source libraries to help ensure they are maintained to commercial standards. The collaboration also enables Pallets maintainers to deliver maintenance, security, and license assurances to Tidelift's managed open source subscription customers, ensuring the libraries work well with their applications.

  • Investors’ Interest in AI, Open Source Software Remains High

    DataRobot, which automates the process of creating machine learning models, announced a $206 million Series E round led by Sapphire Ventures that values the company at more than $1 billion. GitLab, which lets software developers collaborate on projects, announced a $268 million Series E round led by Goldman Sachs and Iconiq, at a $2.75 billion valuation. 

  • Lira, eToro’s New Open-source Programming Language

    eToro, the global multi-asset investment company, has today released the details of Lira, a new open-source programming language for financial contracts. Lira is the first step in bringing the $500 trillion OTC derivatives market onto the Blockchain by introducing a new formal contract language.(i) Lira is a domain-specific language that can be used to write OTC financial contracts for assets currently on the Ethereum blockchain. It is both secure and easy to programme whilst guaranteeing self-executing global settlement and automated trade reporting and monitoring. It’s easy tracking and compression will enable better collateral requirement efficiencies.

  • Automattic raises $300 million at $3 billion valuation from Salesforce Ventures

    Automattic, the company behind WordPress.com, WooCommerce and soon Tumblr, has closed a $300 million funding round at a $3 billion post-money valuation. The Series D round has a single investor, Salesforce Ventures. Funding rounds are something special for Automattic . While the company has been around for nearly 15 years, it hasn’t raised a ton of money. It closed a $160 million Series C round back in 2014 and raised little money before that.