Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 12:19pm
Story KDE: OpenSUSE Leap 15 KDE Edition, Falkon in GSoC, Plasma in Slackware and Future KWin Work Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 11:55am
Story Events: Linux Accra Users Group (LAUG), SouthEast LinuxFest 2018 and BSDCan 2018 Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:50am
Story BSD: FreeBSD's New RC and Latest in OpenBSD Development Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:44am
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:30am
Blog entry Tux Machines Turns 14 Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 10:28am
Story Stable kernels 4.17.2, 4.16.16, 4.14.50, 4.9.109 and 4.4.138 Roy Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 8:22am
Story Gnome 3.28 review - Minimalism gone wrong Rianne Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 7:38am
Story Lazy FPU Vulnerability Now Patched for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, CentOS 7 PCs Rianne Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 12:18am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 17/06/2018 - 12:15am

OSS: Freedom, Gandiva, Working in Collabora

Filed under
OSS
  • Why open source is good for business, and people

    Open source is all about freedom. The freedom to share, to collaborate, and ultimately, to innovate. It’s a concept that goes back way before the internet, but sometimes seems at odds with our online world and its demanding business imperatives. In open source, no one person or company owns a project; instead, it’s influenced by everyone involved – that’s what gives it strength.

    As the saying goes, “It takes a village to raise a child” -- and it takes a community to create a healthy open source project. Everyone in an open source ecosystem has the opportunity to shape and improve the software and help with its development. Some will make a large contribution, some a relatively small one. But they’ll all be involved and they’ll all benefit. Away from these project contributors, the project’s end users can then identify the features they need, and pass new code upstream for consideration. Everyone can make a difference.

    An open source project has the best chance of growing successfully if everyone around it gets involved. From code committers to users, documentation writers to software vendors, platform vendors to integrators -- all have a part to play.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Gandiva

    Data-as-a-Service platform provider Dremio announced a new open-source initiative for Apache Arrow this week. The Gandiva Initiative for Apache Arrow aims to speed up and improve the performance of in-memory analytics using Apache Arrow.

    The project will leverage the open-source compiler LLVM, and apply any changes to programming languages and libraries starting with C++ and Java, with Python, Ruby, Go, Rust and JavaScript changes to follow. With LLVM, Dremio says it will be able to optimize Arrow’s libraries, and low-level operations for specific runtime environments as well as improve resource utilization and provide lower-costs operations.

    “Apache Arrow was created to provide an industry-standard, columnar, in-memory data representation,” said Jacques Nadeau, co-founder and CTO of Dremio, and PMC Chair of Apache Arrow. “Dozens of open source and commercial technologies have since embraced Arrow as their standard for high-performance analytics. The Gandiva Initiative introduces a cross-platform data processing engine for Arrow, representing a quantum leap forward for processing data. Users will experience speed and efficiency gains of up to 100x in the coming months.”

  • Dremio Launches the Open Source Gandiva Initiative for Apache Arrow

    Data-as-a-Service Platform company Dremio recently announced an open source initiative for columnar in-memory analytics underpinned by Apache Arrow. The Gandiva Initiative for Apache Arrow utilizes open source compiler LLVM Project to substantially enhance the speed as well as efficiency of performing in-memory analytics using Apache Arrow, thus making these enhancements widely available to several languages and popular libraries.

  • Working in open source: part 1

    Three years ago on this day I joined Collabora to work on free software full-time. It still feels a bit like yesterday, despite so much time passing since then. In this post, I’m going to reconstruct the events of that year.

    Back in 2015, I worked for Alcatel-Lucent, who had a branch in Bratislava. I can’t say I didn’t like my job — quite contrary, I found it quite exciting: I worked with mobile technologies such as 3G and LTE, I had really knowledgeable and smart colleagues, and it was the first ‘real’ job (not counting the small business my father and I ran) where using Linux for development was not only not frowned upon, but was a mandatory part of the standard workflow, and running it on your workstation was common too, even though not official.

Latest Openwashing

Filed under
OSS

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Software: GIMP 2.10 Review, NetworkManager Improved, 13 Best Free Linux Voice Over IP (VoIP) Software

Filed under
Software
  • PIMP My GIMP – Season 2 Episode 10

    GIMP 2.10 is a steady, incremental update to a very solid and mature baseline. GIMP works well, and it offers the familiar tools of the trade to its users. New features come in small chunks, and you don’t need to fight the program. It works with you. I am less keen on the dark-theme modernization, but that’s something you can easily change. Performance is good, you can use hardware acceleration, and you have the rich, colorful range of filters and plugins, although this – mind – depends on the specific version of the program. Different installation methods will lead to slightly different results, but this is an implementation-specific issue and not something inherent that we can blame on GIMP.

    There are still problems, regardless. For instance, the macro functionality is virtually non-existent. And some things remain stubbornly difficult, whereas I’d expect them to be simple, trivial and accessible. Like creating paths. Very frustrating. Why not just offer pre-formatted SVG shapes, like speech balloons or traffic signs or whatever? Why do I need so many steps to make trivial objects? This is definitely an area that GIMP can improve. At the moment, it’s mostly intended for advanced users, and some options truly require a twist of mind that most people just do not possess. It would be nice to see GIMP offer more newb-friendly methods of image manipulation.

    In general, if you’re looking for a free and powerful image manipulation program, with an intermediate level of learning curve difficulty, a wealth of options and extensible features, and a reasonable workflow, GIMP 2.10 is a good choice. You won’t become a pro overnight, but you just might make your photos a little prettier. Worth testing, especially since version 2.10 only makes the good better. Take care.

  • NetworkManager Finally Supports Wake On Wireless LAN (WoWLAN)

    NetworkManager has finally landed support for dealing with Wake On Wireless LAN (WoWLAN) as the WoL-like functionality for wireless adapters.

    WoWLAN support for NetworkManager has been worked on by Canonical developers and there have been patches floating around for more than one year while just two hours ago, the triumphant milestone was reached of merging the WoWLAN support to NetworkManager. Wake On WLAN allows for systems to be woken from standby power similar to Wake On LAN with Ethernet, but instead using wireless. This support though does require WoWLAN support by the kernel drivers.

  • 13 Best Free Linux Voice Over IP (VoIP) Software – Updated 2018

    Voice over IP (VoIP) software enables telephone-like voice conversations across IP based networks. A VoIP phone service is often cheaper than a traditional Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) phone service and removes geographic restrictions to telephone numbers.

    SIP is the most popular VoIP protocol. This protocol enables two or more people to make phone calls to each other using the Internet to carry the call. SIP to SIP calls on a broadband internet connection are high quality, always free regardless of distance, and offer additional functionality such as free voicemail to email and phone numbers, caller ID, 3-way conference, speed dialing, call forwarding, simultaneous ring, call waiting, call return, caller ID block, and anonymous call rejection.

The LiMux desktop and the City of Munich

Filed under
GNU
Linux

There has been a lot of back and forth around the use of Free Software in public administration. One of the latest initiatives in this area was started by the Free Software Foundation Europe, FSFE. It focuses on the slogan: Public Money – Public Code. There are various usage scenarios for Free Software in public administration. The span ranges from the use of backend technology over user-facing software, e.g. LibreOffice, up to providing a whole free desktop for the administrative staff in a public service entity such as a city council. In this article we will focus on the latter.

When the desktops in an administration are migrated to Linux, the administration becomes a distribution provider. An example for this is the LiMux desktop, that powers the administration of the city of Munich since 2012.

LiMux is a distribution, maintained by the central IT department of the City of Munich. Technically, it builds upon Kubuntu. It provides specific patches, a modified user experience and an automatic distribution system, so all desktops in all departments of the city can be easily administered and offer a consistent user experience.

Distributions in the Free Software ecosystem have different roles, one of them surely being the provider of the finishing touches, especially to important software for its own users. Obviously public administration has special demands. Workflows and documents for example have a totally different importance than for the average Kubuntu user.

In Munich for example, architects in one department complained that Okular, the LiMux and KDE pdf reader, would freeze when they tried to open large construction plans. When the city investigated this issue further, they found out that actually Okular wouldn’t freeze, but loading these large maps would simply occupy Okular for quite a while, making the user think it crashed.

Read more

Also: Purism's Future Plans for PureOS, Malicious Docker Images, Samsung's New Chromebook Plus 2-in-1 Convertible Laptop and More

The 10 Most Beautiful Linux Icon Themes of 2018

Filed under
GNU
Linux

You might think it will take you forever to settle on the ideal icon theme for your Linux desktop because there are a thousand and one options to choose from. And although that might be the case, it doesn’t have to be.

Below is a list of the 10 most beautiful icon themes you can set up on your Linux machine this year. You can install some of them together with the themes they come bundled as a large project (like in the case of Paper,) or install them to use with different GTK and/or Gnome shell themes completely.

Read more

BLUI: An easy way to create game UI

Filed under
Development
Gaming

As part of an indie game development studio, I've experienced the perks of using open source plugins on proprietary game engines. One open source plugin, BLUI by Aaron Shea, has been instrumental in our team's development process. It allows us to create user interface (UI) components using web-based programming like HTML/CSS and JavaScript. We chose to use this open source plugin, even though Unreal Engine (our engine of choice) has a built-in UI editor that achieves a similar purpose. We chose to use open source alternatives for three main reasons: their accessibility, their ease of implementation, and the active, supportive online communities that accompany open source programs.

In Unreal Engine's earliest versions, the only means we had of creating UI in the game was either through the engine's native UI integration, by using Autodesk's Scaleform application, or via a few select subscription-based Unreal integrations spread throughout the Unreal community. In all those cases, the solutions were either incapable of providing a competitive UI solution for indie developers, too expensive for small teams, or exclusively for large-scale teams and AAA developers.

After commercial products and Unreal's native integration failed us, we looked to the indie community for solutions. There we discovered BLUI. It not only integrates with Unreal Engine seamlessly but also maintains a robust and active community that frequently pushes updates and ensures the documentation is easily accessible for indie developers. BLUI gives developers the ability to import HTML files into the Unreal Engine and program them even further while inside the program. This allows UI created through web languages to integrate with the game's code, assets, and other elements with the full power of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and other web languages. It also provides full support for the open source Chromium Embedded Framework.

Read more

Also: Why (some) agile teams fail

What is PureOS and how is it built?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • What is PureOS and how is it built?

    PureOS is a general purpose operating system that is based on the Linux kernel and is focused on being an entirely Free (as in freedom) OS. It is officially endorsed by the Free Software Foundation. We adhere to the Debian Social Contract and the GNU FSDG.

    PureOS aims to match and surpass mainstream operating systems (such as Windows and macOS) by striking the balance between security and usability, to provide the best possible out-of-the-box experience paired with the best privacy, security, and software freedom protections possible. The idea is to make it easy to feel safe and secure with an operating system you can trust from the ground up and with appropriate tools.

  • PureOS Official Web site
  • Purism's PureOS To Explore OSTree/Flatpak, Wants To Develop An "Ethical App Store"

    Purism's PureOS downstream of Debian that is shipped on their Librem laptops and is also planned as part of the software stack making up their in-development Librem 5 smart-phone is planning for more changes.

    At this stage, over upstream Debian the PureOS spin has changes to allow it to meet the Free Software Foundation requirements for a GNU/Linux distribution, enables sudo by default, modifies various settings, utilizes the Wayland-based GNOME desktop, enables AppArmor by default, and other mostly cosmetic work at this point.

Games: The Underhollow (Mode), Croteam Sale, Oxygen Not Included, Beyond Blue

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Underhollow, a Battle Royale-like mode for Dota 2 is live and it's damn fun

    Dota 2 [Official Site, Steam], the free MOBA from Valve has been updated with The Underhollow, a Battle Royale-like mode that's exclusive for Battle Pass owners. It's so good, it should be in the game.

    This new mode pits eight teams of three, to be the last team standing in a fight for cheese. You can bring two friends or you can queue up to be matched up with strangers. Even while playing it with people I didn't know, it was an interesting experience.

  • Croteam are having a big sale to celebrate 25 years

    Croteam, developer of the Serious Sam series and The Talos Principle have stuck around for 25 years and so they're celebrating with a big sale.

  • Oxygen Not Included just got a major update & a new animated short

    Oxygen Not Included, the space colony sim from Klei has a new major update out with another lovely animated short to watch. This is the same update I wrote about before while it was in beta, it's just pushed out to everyone now.

  • Beyond Blue is an undersea exploration game from the developer of Never Alone

    While it's sad we don't have Subnautica, it seems we will be getting to explore the oceans with Beyond Blue [Official Site, Steam] due out next year.

    Beyond Blue, from the developer of Never Alone plans to release in "Early 2019" with Linux support. Check out the trailer below:

Mesa Graphics in Linux

Filed under
Development
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Mesa Rolls Out Support For ARB_sample_locations

    Mesa has been plumbed in to support the ARB_sample_locations OpenGL extension and is now exposed with the Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D driver.

    ARB_sample_locations was part of the "OpenGL 2015" update but hasn't made it into a released version of OpenGL, hence why it wasn't a priority for Mesa developers. But now it's been wired up within core Mesa and is currently flipped on for NVC0 in Mesa 18.2-devel.

  • Mesa's VirGL For OpenGL Within VMs Now Supports Tessellation Shaders

    It was just days ago that the VirGL driver stack -- which is used for supporting OpenGL hardware acceleration within guest VMs that is passed onto the host's driver -- picked up FP64 support while now its latest addition is ARB_tessellation_shader support.

    With the latest Mesa Git and the VirGL renderer library code is updated (as well as your host OpenGL driver supporting GL4), there is now support for tessellation shaders. The support has landed in Mesa 18.2 Git for this popular OpenGL 4.0 feature.

Meet the Frenchman masterminding a Google-free Android

Filed under
Android
Interviews
MDV

Open source had a moral purpose when it was fighting "The Borg", Microsoft, in the 1990s, but then it fell from view. You could say it has found its mojo again, only this time it is about loosening the grip of companies built on ever more intrusive personal data processing: Google and Facebook. One of the biggest but most promising challenges is creating an Android free of Google's data-slurping.

Four years ago there were four mobile platforms, but since Microsoft and BlackBerry withdrew, it's a duopoly of Apple and Google.

The creation of a new third platform – a Google-free Android – now looks feasible, given the Great Unbundling the European Commission is likely to order. But someone has to build the damn thing – and it's going to be a mammoth task.

Read more

Samsung Unveils Chromebook Plus V2 Convertible with New Processor, Rear Camera

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Samsung has unveiled on Thursday the second generation of its Samsung Chromebook Plus 2-in-1 convertible laptop powered by Google's Chrome OS Linux-based operating system.

Designed to help you be more productive on the go while remaining a thin, lightweight and stylish 2-in-1 convertible Chromebook, the Samsung Chromebook Plus V2 is here with a secondary, rear-facing 13MP f1.9 camera with autofocus, mounted on the keyboard deck. It comes with a new, more efficient CPU to prolong the battery life of the devices, as well as a built-in pen, which can be used for all sort of things from signing a document to writing a note or drawing a sketch and edit documents.

Read more

Also: Bloke sues Microsoft: Give me $600m – or my copy of Windows 7 back

How Docker Is Helping to Save The World (Literally)

Filed under
Server
Sci/Tech

There are many different things that individuals might consider to be a life threatening event and then there are extinction level events, for example an asteroid hitting Earth.

While the idea of an asteroid hitting Earth and ending all life is the stuff of Hollywood movie like Armageddon, it's an actual, though remote, possibility that NASA is investigating, with the help of Docker containers.

NASA is currently developing a mission known as DART - the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, which is a spacecraft that will deploy a kinetic impact technique to deflect an asteroid. Christopher Heistand, DART Flight Software Lead, at the The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) that is helping to build the DART ship, detailed how his group is using Docker.

Read more

5 Commands for Checking Memory Usage in Linux

Filed under
Linux

The Linux operating system includes a plethora of tools, all of which are ready to help you administer your systems. From simple file and directory tools to very complex security commands, there’s not much you can’t do on Linux. And, although regular desktop users may not need to become familiar with these tools at the command line, they’re mandatory for Linux admins. Why? First, you will have to work with a GUI-less Linux server at some point. Second, command-line tools often offer far more power and flexibility than their GUI alternative.

Read more

Modicia: Ultimate Linux with a Twist

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Modicia O.S. Desktop Ultimate 18 LTS lives up to its name in terms of being an ultimate computing platform. It offers a very pleasing user experience that is ideal for office or home functions.

It has the potential to be ranked among the best of the general-purpose Linux distros. I tend to favor Linux Mint's homespun Cinnamon desktop as my primary computing workhorse. I keep a few winners on my various computers for variety and different productivity options.

Modicia has been my preferred OS the last few weeks after I stumbled upon its smile-creating capabilities. Its combination of panel types and other user-enhanced tricks soon may qualify it for the default boot choice on my primary computer.

Read more

How to Mount and Use an exFAT Drive on Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
HowTos

This quick tutorial shows you how to enable exFAT file system support on Ubuntu and other Ubuntu-based Linux distributions. This way you won’t see any error while mounting exFAT drives on your system.
Read more

Fedora 29 To Fully Embrace The FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification

Filed under
Red Hat

Adding to the growing list of features for Fedora 29 is a plan to fully support the FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification and making use of their defined fragment files to populate boot-loader boot menu entries, including the kernel entries.

The FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification is an existing spec for trying to allow a standardized boot configuration format between operating systems / Linux distributions that are based upon drop-in files. The goal has been to be "robust, simple, works without rewriting configuration files and is free of namespace clashes." The specification can be found on FreeDesktop.org and in its current form for the past two years.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 4.7 Brings More Mitigations Against Spectre Flaws

Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.14.50 kernel, Porteus Kiosk 4.7.0 is the second release of the operating system in 2018 and comes five months after version 4.6 to introduce more mitigations against the Spectre security vulnerabilities, though the next-gen Spectre flaws require microcode firmware updates for Intel CPUs. "Newly discovered "Spectre Next Generation" vulnerabilities require updated microcode from Intel which is not available yet. Please consider enabling automatic updates service for your kiosks to receive latest fixes and patches as soon as they become available," reads today's announcement. Read more

Linspire 8 Enters Development Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Freespire 3.0.9 Is Out

Freespire 3.0.9 is a small incremental update of the free and open-source GNU/Linux distribution that includes all the latest security and software updates released upstream until June 11, 2018. It also introduces new light and dark modes, a full instance of the Calligra office suite, and replaces Mozilla Thunderbird with Kontact. The developers recommend all users running the Freespire 3.0 operating system series on their personal computers to run a system-wide update if they want to upgrade to Freespire 3.0.9 and receive all the latest changes. On the other hand, new users are encouraged to download the Freespire 3.0.9 ISO image. Read more Also: Linspire 8.0 Alpha 1 Released

How SUSE Is Bringing Open Source Projects and Communities Together

The modern IT infrastructure is diverse by design. People are mixing different open source components that are coming from not only different vendors, but also from different ecosystems. In this article, we talk with Thomas Di Giacomo, CTO of SUSE, about the need for better collaboration between open source projects that are being used across industries as we are move toward a cloud native world. Read more

Games: Insurgency: Sandstorm, Driftland: The Magic Revival and More