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Monday, 10 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:17am
Story High Resolution Scroll-Wheel Support Re-Added Ahead Of Linux 4.21 Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 7:15am
Story PhysX Liberated Roy Schestowitz 5 09/12/2018 - 7:01am
Story Games: Inside, Dirt 4, Sundered: Eldritch Edition Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 6:13am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 3:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 2:58am
Story GNOME and GStreamer Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 2:47am
Story Linux 4.19.8 Released With BLK-MQ Fix To The Recent Data Corruption Bug Roy Schestowitz 1 09/12/2018 - 2:46am
Story ExTiX 19.0 with Deepin 15.5 Desktop, Refracta snapshot, Calamares 3.2.2 Installer, Kodi 18.0 and kernel 4.20.0-rc4-exton – Build 181208 Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 2:33am
Story AMDGPU Driver Gets Final Batch Of Features For Linux 4.21 Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2018 - 2:29am

Best New Linux Desktop Environments

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Most Linux users have their own desktop environment preference. For example, I enjoy using MATE, where other users I talk with get a lot of value out of XFCE, GNOME or KDE. Yet it surprised me when I asked my Linux using friends what they thought of some of the "newer" Linux desktop environments.

About half of these Linux users have never tried any desktop environment outside of the ones mentioned above. Because of this, I thought it would be interesting to compare the best new Linux desktop environments making a name for themselves.

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Tor Browser: An Ultimate Web Browser for Anonymous Web Browsing in Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

Most of us give a considerable time of ours to Internet. The primary Application we require to perform our internet activity is a browser, a web browser to be more perfect. Over Internet most of our’s activity is logged to Server/Client machine which includes IP address, Geographical Location, search/activity trends and a whole lots of Information which can potentially be very harmful, if used intentionally the other way.

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LVFS and American Megatrends Inc.

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AMI joins the LVFS

    American Megatrends Inc. may not be a company you’ve heard of, unless perhaps you like reading early-boot BIOS messages. AMI is the world’s largest BIOS firmware vendor, supplying firmware and tools to customers such as Asus, Clevo, Intel, AMD and many others. If you’ve heard of a vendor using Aptio for firmware updates, that means it’s from them. AMI has been testing the LVFS, UpdateCapsule and fwupd for a few months and is now fully compatible. They are updating their whitepapers for customers explaining the process of generating a capsule, using the ESRT, and generating deliverables for the LVFS.

  • AMI Is The Latest Vendor Joining The Linux Vendor Firmware Service

    The Linux Vendor Firmware Service has scored a major win in the trek of easily updating of BIOS/firmware images from Linux... BIOS/firmware vendor AMI has joined the LVFS!

    Red Hat's Richard Hughes shared today that AMI has joined the LVFS. AMI has been vetting LVFS, UpdateCapsule, and Fwupd for months now and are offering compatibility for updating their firmware using this open-source tech and providing guidance to their many customers on how to deploy firmware updates on this platform.

Linaro partners with IIC on upcoming 96Boards Industrial Edition spec

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linaro and the Industrial Internet Consortium announced a partnership to collaborate on open source Arm standards for industrial IoT involving OTA, TSN, and security, as well as develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec.

In September Arm-backed Linaro, which creates open source Linux and Android code for Arm devices and oversees the 96Boards open hardware standard, joined the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC). This week the IIC and Linaro announced a partnership to work on Arm industrial IoT (IIoT) standards.

Of particular interest is a plan to develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec. Other projects will include standardization around Over-The-Air (OTA) updates, Time Sensitive Networking (TSN), and trustworthiness (i.e. digital trust security systems).

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AMD Radeon RX 590 Linux Benchmarks, 18-Way NVIDIA/AMD Gaming Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

With the very newest AMDGPU Linux kernel patches, the Radeon RX 590 is now working correctly on Linux. Here's a look at how this latest Polaris graphics card is performing for Linux games against seventeen other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards in a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan benchmarks.

AMD launched the Radeon RX 590 in mid-November as a Polaris shrink down to 12nm and featuring 36 compute units, a base frequency up to 1469MHz and boost up to 1545MHz, 2304 Stream processors, 8GB of GDDR5 video memory, and is rated for up to 7.1 TFLOPs of performance potential.

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5 Screen Recorders for the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

There are so many reasons why you might need to record your Linux desktop. The two most important are for training and for support. If you are training users, a video recording of the desktop can go a long way to help them understand what you are trying to impart. Conversely, if you’re having trouble with one aspect of your Linux desktop, recording a video of the shenanigans could mean the difference between solving the problem and not. But what tools are available for the task? Fortunately, for every Linux user (regardless of desktop), there are options available. I want to highlight five of my favorite screen recorders for the Linux desktop. Among these five, you are certain to find one that perfectly meets your needs. I will only be focusing on those screen recorders that save as video. What video format you prefer may or may not dictate which tool you select.

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Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Now Rolling Out to Ubuntu Phone Users, Here's What's New

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 is now rolling out to Fairphone 2, Nexus 5, OnePlus One, BQ Aquaris M10 FHD, Nexus 4, Meizu PRO 5, Meizu MX 4, BQ Aquaris E4.5, and BQ Aquaris E5 HD devices as an incremental update to the OTA-5 version released two months ago, which rebased Ubuntu Touch on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series.

"Ubuntu Touch is the privacy and freedom respecting mobile operating system by UBports. Our newest update, OTA-6, is rolling out over the next five days (completing on Wednesday, December 12). You can skip to "How to get OTA-6" to get it now if you're impatient, or read on to learn more about this release," said UBports in today's announcement.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Officially Released

Oneplus One improvements

The December 2018 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

Filed under
PCLOS

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the December 2018 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community.

Mesa 18.3.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.3.0

    Mesa 18.3.0 is now available.

    This release consists of approximately 1700 commits from 120 developers.

    Huge thanks to all the developers, testers and users for their ongoing work and support shaping up the 18.3.0 release.

  • Mesa 18.3 Released With Intel & Radeon Vulkan Driver Improvements, New GPU Support

    Mesa 18.3 is now available as the latest quarterly feature update to these open-source OpenGL and Vulkan graphics drivers for Linux.

    The Mesa 18.3 features are aplenty and on the AMD side range from Raven 2, Picasso, and Vega 20 support through RADV Vulkan transform feedback, faster RadeonSI fast color clears, OpenGL 4.5 compatibility profile support, and many RADV Vulkan additions. The Intel stack meanwhile picked up new PCI IDs, various Vulkan driver extensions, and more.

  • Mesa 18.3.0 for those of you using the open source drivers

    For those of you using Intel and AMD (and some older NVIDIA cards) Mesa 18.3.0 was officially released today.

    It has been three months since the last major release, so as expected this new and improved version comes with all the latest bells and whistles.

Linux Networking Performance To Improve Thanks To Retpoline Overhead Reduction

Filed under
Linux

One of the areas where Linux performance has been lower this year since Spectre came to light has been for networking performance, but with the upcoming Linux 4.21 cycle that will be partially addressed.

Linux networking performance took a hit from the introduction of Retpolines "Return Trampolines" at the start of the year for addressing Spectre Variant Two.

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Mageia 7 Beta Finally Rolls Along For Testing

Filed under
MDV

It's been a year and a half since the release of Mageia 6 while finally the Mageia 7 beta images have surfaced.

The Mageia 7 Beta is shipping with the KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, is running on the fresh Linux 4.19 kernel, provides the Mesa 18.3 3D drivers, and has a wealth of package updates compared to the state shipped by Mageia 6. Mageia 7 also offers reworked ARM support (including initial AArch64 enablement), DNF as an alternative to URPMI, and a variety of other updates. The in-progress release notes cover some of the other Mageia 7 changes.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Avouch Linux 0.1.0 Beta 1 Gnome Run Through
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • How to harness big data for maximum business value

    Despite most businesses understanding the power and competitive advantage they could gain from harnessing their big data more effectively and leveraging it more efficiently, it’s not an easy goal to achieve.

    That’s why we’ve partnered with Spicule to co-present, ‘How to harness big data for maximum business value’, a webinar dealing with the challenges of gathering and processing data.

  • The Intel Linux Discrete GPU Driver Updated -- For Their Two Decade Old i740

    While we are all super anxious to learn more about the Intel discrete graphics card offerings planned for their initial debut in 2020, in representing the beauty of open-source, there was an open-source Linux display driver update on Thursday for their "original" discrete card: the Intel740.

    Yesterday marked the xf86-video-i740 1.4.0 driver release, the open-source X.Org driver that supports the original Intel 740 display hardware as Intel's only released discrete graphics chip up to this point. That was two decades ago, but in showing the possibilities by open-source software, there's this new display driver release.

  • 3.5-inch SBC features Intel Coffee Lake chips

    Commell’s 3.5-inch “LS-37L” SBC showcases Intel’s 8th Gen Core CPUs with triple displays, up to 16GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 2x SATA, 4x USB 3.1, 6x serial, and a mini-PCIe slot.

    In August, Commell launched the LV-67X, one of the first industrial Mini-ITX boards with Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs. Now, it has followed up with a Coffee Lake based 3.5-inch LS-37L board. The SBC has the same FCLGA1151 socket, supporting up to 6-core, 65W TDP Coffee Lake S-series processors such as the 3.1GHz/4.3GHz Core i5-8600.

Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Play with NFC HAT I

    The other day I got an NFC HAT for SBC to play with. And I started to play with it on my Raspberry Pi last week.

    Things did not go smoothly, which is expected. But some part of it still goes beyond my expection.

    So what’s it? It’s a NFC development board based on NXP PN7150. You can buy it from taobao. It’s header is compatible with Raspberry Pi, and minimal modification to use with Salted Fish Pi. As I already have Raspberry Pi 1/2/3, I simply plug it onto Raspberry Pi 2 running with Fedora.

  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2018/10
  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2018/09
  • Fedora 29 : Shotcut video editor.

Software and Howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Wipro expands global partnership with open source software provider Alfresco
  • Crypto Giant Bitmain Open Sources KYC Software Tool ‘Coconut’
  • Crypto Giant Bitmain Open Sources KYC Software Tool ‘Coconut’
  • Comcast Leads Trellis, an Open Source Data Center Switching Fabric

    At the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) Connect event this week, Ron Howald, VP of network architecture at Comcast, copped to the fact that Google forced service providers such as Comcast to find ways to deliver faster internet speeds. “Google had quite a bit to do with setting the bar when they started with Google Fiber,” said Howald.

  • Open source: a slow rise to the top

    Is the debate over? Are we no longer fighting over open source versus propriety software?

    Thomas Lee, CEO, Wingu: If we look inside our customer base, we are seeing widespread adoption of open source technology. But I think it's also clear that propriety is not going away. I've seen a company recently take out all its open source software in favour of propriety. Clearly, the debate isn't going away.

    Wilhelm Strydom, relationship manager, Obsidian Systems: Is there room for proprietary stuff? Clearly there is if you look at the success of the most propriety vendors out there, in terms of not only software, but hardware as well.

    But if you talk back-end, what happens behind that interface, I don't think there's much of a battle going on. The battle has mostly been won by open source. This can be seen in some of the propriety guys adopting open source principals. In this respect, open source has clearly been the winner.

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces release FIVE, 5G ready

    ETSI is excited to announce the availability of OSM Release FIVE. This new Release is a huge step towards 5G network deployments and their end-to-end orchestration by telecom operators. In Release FIVE, OSM extends its orchestration capabilities beyond virtual domains, expanding them across transport networks; as well as physical and hybrid network elements.

    [...]

    Thus, among a large number of new features, the OSM Release FIVE stands out by bringing complete support of 5G Network Slices; dynamic creation of inter-datacentre connections across heterogeneous Wide Area Networks (WAN), extended support of Service Function Chaining (SFC); policy-based closed loop control, extended monitoring capabilities, including VNF metrics collection; and support of physical and hybrid network functions, (PNFs and HNFs respectively).

    In addition, Release FIVE includes significant enhancements in terms of user experience, such as a brand new GUI-based Composer for network functions and services, an improved dashboard for logs, metrics and alarms, and much faster start-up and responsiveness.

  • FOSSID Establishes First Independent Mirror of World's Largest Source Code Archive

    FOSSID and Software Heritage today announced that they have signed an agreement to establish the first independent mirror of the largest source code archive in the world.

  • OpenShift Commons Gathering Preview – Your Personal Prelude to Kubecon/Seattle

    Over 100+ companies will be in attending next week’s OpenShift Commons Gathering which is co-located with KubeCon and CloudNativeCon in Seattle at the Washington State Convention Center. The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss real implementations of container technologies, best practices for cloud native infrastructure and the upstream projects that make up the OpenShift ecosystem.

  • Multi-model databases are more juicy

    It sounds like a brand of orange juice… and its community edition is written in C++, but actually ArangoDB is a native multi-model database.

    ArangoDB Community Edition is available under open-source license… but news this week focuses on the release of core version 3.4 as a transactional database for developers.

  • Open-source discovery of chemical leads for next-generation chemoprotective antimalarials
  • CZI announces support for open-source software efforts to improve biomedical imaging

    Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced funding for open-source software efforts to improve image analysis and visualization in biomedicine. Microscopy -- critical to modern cell biology -- generates large volumes of complex data that pose significant challenges for analysis and visualization. The funding will support developers ("Imaging Software Fellows") from three projects to develop and maintain software tools, and begin collaborating to help create a cohesive, shared ecosystem of resources that can accelerate basic research and benefit the entire field.

  • A Closer Look at Tesla’s Open-Source Patent Pledge
  • Ground Breaking Decision In Open Source Software: The Versata Software Case

    An Open Source Software is a type of software with a source code which can be modified, enhanced and inspected by ANYONE. Source code is that part of a particular software program which empowers a person to alter how the software works or improve it by adding features or fixing parts that do not work properly. Differing from closed software, whereby only the person/organization that created the software has the capacity to alter it, OSS is preferred more and is a better option for the users than the former, granting them more freedom in relation to the software. Some prime examples of OSS are the Apache HTTP Server, the e-commerce platform osCommerce, internet browsers Mozilla Firefox and Chromium. Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn all release OSS so developers can share knowledge, create solutions, and contribute to stable and functional products. There are certain landmark cases in the field of open source software that hold paramount importance in deciding the future of the same as well as opening legal floodgates in its respect, one of which has been discussed at length below.

    [...]

    The decisions arrived at these cases are important in a number of ways, primarily because it confirmed the working of the GPLv2 structure. Mark Radcliffe, a licensing expert and partner at law firm DLA Piper has rightly exclaimed that "The days of open source software free lunches are rapidly coming to an end, and that means enterprises that fail to stick to the terms of open source licenses can expect to be sued."

  • Intake for Cataloging Spark
  • 6 Lessons from Learning to Code
  • Auto incrementing IDs for MongoDB
  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Firefox Coming to the Windows 10 on Qualcomm Snapdragon Devices Ecosystem

    At Mozilla, we’ve been building browsers for 20 years and we’ve learned a thing or two over those decades. One of the most important lessons is putting people at the center of the web experience. We pioneered user-centric features like tabbed browsing, automatic pop-up blocking, integrated web search, and browser extensions for the ultimate in personalization. All of these innovations support real users’ needs first, putting business demands in the back seat.

    Mozilla is uniquely positioned to build browsers that act as the user’s agent on the web and not simply as the top of an advertising funnel. Our mission not only allows us to put privacy and security at the forefront of our product strategy, it demands that we do so. You can see examples of this with Firefox’s Facebook Container extension, Firefox Monitor, and its private by design browser data syncing features. This will become even more apparent in upcoming releases of Firefox that will block certain cross-site and third-party tracking by default while delivering a fast, personal, and highly mobile experience.

Security: Site Security and New FUD

Filed under
Security
  • Why do small sites get hacked?

    High traffic volume helps boost earnings on partner programs by redirecting visitors to other sites, gets more views of unauthorized advertisements and attracts more clicks on rogue links. But that is not the only way hackers make money.

    Unprotected sites with low traffic volume are equally attractive to hackers. It is the way they are used that differs from how hackers monetize more popular websites. Any normal site, with an audience of as little as 30 visitors a day, can still be threatened by hacking and infection. 

  • (Website) size is not important

    A common fallacy says that big, popular web sites are more likely to be the targets of hacking. After all, they have the biggest customer databases and the most amount of traffic. To a hacker, more traffic means more money. Right? 

    Not quite. In Greg Zemskov’s latest blog post, he explains why small sites are just as attractive to hackers as big ones, what the hackers do with such sites, and what small site owners and administrators can do to avoid becoming victims.

  • ESET discovers 21 new Linux malware families [Ed:  Catalin Cimpanu misrepresents what ESET actually wrote. Go to the source, not those flame-baiters of CBS.]
  • Top 5 New Open Source Vulnerabilities in November 2018 [Ed: Microsoft friends are so eager to make FOSS look dangerous, like quite major a risk]

Plan your own holiday calendar at the Linux command line

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Growing Your Small Business With An Affordable OS

Your small business needs to grow, there's no doubt about that. Expansion is the name of the game when you have a one or two man company, and you're going to want to bring on at least 20 or more people to really get the cogs grinding. And if you're working on a digital interface, slowly phasing pen and paper out of the office you operate in, you're going to need plenty of people around to oil the engine and keep the tech in a usable state. Because of this, technology helps your small business grow, and can do quite a few wonders for the time and effort you invested into it. Even if you're working on a minimal budget, there's quite a few option to look into to make sure you've got just as much of a chance as the shop next door to you that seems to have a never ending stream of customers. After all, you've got to get your internal processes working perfectly first, and with a bit of technological aid, you might manage that faster than you first thought. Read more

Security: Polkit, CSP, Ansible and Router Hardening Checklist

  • Polkit CVE-2018-19788 vs. SELinux
  • Why is your site not using Content Security Policy / CSP?
    Yesterday, I had the pleasure of watching on Frikanalen the OWASP talk by Scott Helme titled "What We’ve Learned From Billions of Security Reports". I had not heard of the Content Security Policy standard nor its ability to "call home" when a browser detect a policy breach (I do not follow web page design development much these days), and found the talk very illuminating. The mechanism allow a web site owner to use HTTP headers to tell visitors web browser which sources (internal and external) are allowed to be used on the web site. Thus it become possible to enforce a "only local content" policy despite web designers urge to fetch programs from random sites on the Internet, like the one enabling the attack reported by Scott Helme earlier this year.
  • Red Hat Ansible Playbooks Password Exposure Vulnerability [CVE-2018-16859]
    CVE-2018-16859. A vulnerability in Red Hat Ansible could allow a local attacker to discover plaintext passwords on a targeted system.
  • Router Hardening Checklist

Games: DiRT 4, SuperTuxKart and The 10 Best Free Linux Games

  • DiRT4 Power Slides onto Linux in 2019
    DiRT 4 is the latest instalment of the popular franchise to drift on to free software platforms (as well as a non-free software platform in macOS). It follows on from the successful Linux release of DiRT Rally last spring. DiRT 4 was originally released on Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in June 2017 and has garnered plenty of praise, positive reviews and high review scores.
  • SuperTuxKart Spruces Up Its In-Game Visuals
    SuperTuxKart, the famous free software kart racer, is picking up some improved visuals within the in-game user interface and racing screens. Detailing their plans on the game’s official dev blog, the team behind the iconic racer have shared more details about the graphical spit and polish they’ve given the game ahead of its next major release.
  • Refreshing the GUI
    Online multiplayer won't be the focus of this new blog post : we will tell you more about it when launching the official beta in the coming weeks. Instead, we'll tell you more about the many changes in the game's UI.
  • The 10 Best Free Linux Games
    There are plenty of excellent games on Linux, and a fair amount of them are completely free. Some are open source, and others are fairly big names available through Steam. In every case, these are quality games that you can play any time on Linux at absolutely no cost.

Programming Leftovers