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Friday, 24 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Crazy Compiler Optimizations Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 2:29pm
Story Mozilla: BigInt, WebRender, Mozilla Localization, Firefox 67 Release and More Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 2:22pm
Story New Release: Tor Browser 8.5 Rianne Schestowitz 1 23/05/2019 - 2:17pm
Story Linux Foundation Statement on Huawei Entity List Ruling Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 2:04pm
Story Antergos Linux Project Ends Rianne Schestowitz 3 23/05/2019 - 2:00pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 1:19pm
Story Huawei Linux Laptop Driver Improvements On The Way Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 1:04pm
Story Kernel: Wayland, NVIDIA and Linux Development (LWN) Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 6:43am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 6:22am
Story Some Difficulty That Are Often Experienced By New Linux Users Roy Schestowitz 23/05/2019 - 6:01am

Stable kernels 5.1.4, 5.0.18, 4.19.45, 4.14.121 , and 4.9.178

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1.4

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.4 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.0.18
  • Linux 4.19.45
  • Linux 4.14.121
  • Linux 4.9.178

New Release: Tor Browser 8.5

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
Web

Tor Browser 8.5 is the first stable release for Android. Since we released the first alpha version in September, we've been hard at work making sure we can provide the protections users are already enjoying on desktop to the Android platform. Mobile browsing is increasing around the world, and in some parts, it is commonly the only way people access the internet. In these same areas, there is often heavy surveillance and censorship online, so we made it a priority to reach these users.

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The Document Foundation releases LibreOffice 6.2.4

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.2.4, the fourth bug and regression fixing release of the LibreOffice 6.2 family, targeted at tech-savvy individuals: early adopters, technology enthusiasts and power users.

LibreOffice’s individual users are helped by a global community of volunteers: https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/community-support/. On the website and the wiki there are guides, manuals, tutorials and HowTos. Donations help us to make all of these resources available.

LibreOffice users are invited to join the community at https://www.libreoffice.org/community/get-involved/, to improve LibreOffice by contributing back in one of the following areas: development, documentation, infrastructure, localization, quality assurance, design or marketing.

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Also: LibreOffice 6.2.4 Open-Source Office Suite Released with More Than 100 Bug Fixes

Games: Gallium3D, Google, DXVK and New Titles on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Gets On-Disk Shader Cache Support

    In helping to speed-up game load times when switching to the new Intel "Iris" Gallium3D OpenGL Linux driver and smooth out frame-rates for games sporadically loading shaders, Mesa 19.2-devel has added on-disk shader cache support for the driver.

    Intel's existing "i965" classic Mesa driver has long supported an on-disk shader cache along with the other Mesa OpenGL drivers while now the Gallium3D shader cache functionality has been extended for the new Iris driver.

  • 10 Unknown Google Search Games for You

    Google Search by default has games hidden in it, which is a fact, not many Google users are aware of. Google has compiled some really authentic and entertaining games over a period of time, that can be played in Google.com page itself without having to visit any other Web page.

    Most of these games were made to appear as Google Doodle, in relation with certain anniversaries that have been a remarkable day in history. While some of these games are not available easily because Google Doodle keeps changing.

    However, a few of them continue to be played even today. All you need is to search the game by its name in Google and hit “search” and Voila! The games will appear right in front of your eyes and you can play them right then and there.

    Read on to know about the playable games still available, though hidden within the Google Search.

  • Valve have released a new dedicated mobile Steam Chat application

    Now that Valve have upgraded the chat and friends system in the desktop Steam client, they've also rolled out a brand new dedication mobile application to do the same.

    This isn't the normal Steam mobile application, instead they've oddly decided to split them in two. Touching on that, they said the original Steam mobile application is going to get some upgrades "focused on account security" including better Steam Guard options, like QR codes and a one-touch login.

  • Sci-fi first-person shooter 'Interstellar Marines' continues to live on, with a big update out now

    Interstellar Marines, a once promising sci-fi first-person shooter that slowly died is slowly making a comeback. Update 28 was released just recently, giving it an overhaul in a few places.

  • Valve working on a stand-alone version of the popular Dota Auto Chess

    Dota Auto Chess, a very popular custom game mode for Dota 2 is being turned into a stand-alone game by Valve.

    The Dota 2 arcade is full of interesting games but nothing has really come close to Dota Auto Chess, looking at it right now it has over 125K people playing just this one game mode. It also has over 8 million people subscribed to it, to give you another idea of just how popular it is. Based on player-count, if it manages to keep it for the stand-alone version it would put it into the top-5 games on Steam.

  • Blacksite returns alongside Sirocco for the latest Danger Zone update in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive

    Counter-Strike: Global Offensive's newer Battle Royale mode, Danger Zone, continues to be tweaked and the original map has made a return.

    This should help spice things up a bit, as Blacksite is quite a good map but I've also immensely enjoyed playing on the newer and more open Sirocco map. Thankfully, Valve have now enabled Danger Zone for both maps together as a "time-based map rotation" as you can see below:

  • DXVK 1.2.1 really does improve Overwatch quite a lot on Linux with NVIDIA

    In the latest release of DXVK 1.2.1 that was released last week, it included a note about improved GPU utilization. They certainly weren’t kidding, with Overwatch now performing even better on Linux with Wine.

    When I previously wrote about it, I said I was in shock at how well you could play Overwatch on Linux thanks to Wine, DXVK and a little help from Lutris. I included a video in the previous article to show it off, which showed the framerate hardly going above 100FPS and often dipped down to around 60FPS. Checking back, previous versions of DXVK didn’t let my NVIDIA 980ti GPU utilization go above 80%.

  • The absolutely insane and pretty awesome twin-stick shooter 'BulletRage' is now on Kickstarter

    BulletRage is a game I firmly think is worth supporting, as the developer has had Linux support in very early and it does seem like a pretty awesome twin-stick shooter.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dark Style Rises | LINUX Unplugged 302

    Can the Free Desktop avoid being left behind in the going dark revolution? Cassidy from elementary OS joins us to discuss their proposal.

    Plus we complete our Red Hat arc by giving Silverblue the full workstation shakedown, Drew shares his complete review, and we discuss the loss of Antergros.

  • mintCast 309 – Virtualization
  • curl 7.65.0 dances in

    After another eight week cycle was been completed, curl shipped a new release into the world. 7.65.0 brings some news and some security fixes but is primarily yet again a set of bug-fixes bundled up.

  •  

  • Time for school as the big Cities: Skylines - Campus expansion is out now

    Paradox Interactive and Colossal Order have put school back on the map, as the Cities: Skylines - Campus expansion is out now. In terms of features and new content, this is one of the bigger expansions to be released.

    Adding in a little extra complexity for those who want it while also giving you even more freedom at the same time with the way you design your campus. Much like what came with the Parklife expansion, Campus lets you freely zone an entire area to build your fancy new education system.

  • The Humble tinyBuild Bundle 2019 is live with some lovely Linux games

    Here's something to keep you going for a little while, the Humble tinyBuild Bundle 2019 went live today and it has plenty of Linux games.

  • Academic Support Center BiASC connects the SUSE Academic Program with Belgium and Luxembourg

    The SUSE Academic Program has taken significant strides in new territories with the help of trusted academic partners from different regions. BiASC is an academic support organization that connects with IT academies from higher and secondary education and from non-commercial and professional training institutions. Already working with a number of universities, including the University of Luxembourg and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, we hope to see our footprint spread with support from BiASC.

  • Raspberry Pi Close To Seeing CPUFreq Support

    Nicolas Saenz Julienne of SUSE has been working on CPUFreq support for the Raspberry Pi single board computers to allow for the Linux kernel to provide CPU frequency scaling controls.

    This CPUFreq support communicates with firmware running on a dedicated processor on the Raspberry Pi that is responsible for adjusting the CPU frequencies as well as that of the VPU and related blocks. The driver can request changes to the CPU frequencies though isn't necessarily honored depending upon thermal factors and other criteria. The firmware also offers the ability to request a turbo mode, but that can boost up other clocks and appears to be causing issues at least with the current state of the Raspberry Pi kernel drivers.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • RC candidate of the day (1)

    Sometimes the list of release-critical bugs is overwhelming, and it’s hard to find something to tackle.

    So I invite you to have a go at #928040, which may only be a case of reviewing and uploading the included patch.

  • [GSoC – 1] Achieving consistency between SDDM and Plasma

    I’m very excited to start off the Google Summer of Code blogging experience regarding the project I’m doing with my KDE mentors David Edmundson and Nate Graham.

    What we’ll be trying to achieve this summer is have SDDM be more in sync with the Plasma desktop.

    What does that mean? The essence of the problem is quite simple: you can customize Plasma to no end, yet the only thing you can customize in SDDM is the cursor theme. As a customization-loving user, this has been a big pet peeve of mine. In my attempts to work around the issue I’ve already went as far as adding one too many config points to the Breeze SDDM theme. So to finish that project and thereby solve our GSoC issue, perhaps we could just hook up the respective KCM’s UI to those options…

  • Guaranteed Hard Real-time Response and Determinism from Aitech's Space SBC Processor Using NASA cFS Linux
  • Embedded PC with 6th or 7th Gen CPUs offers optional mini-PCIe and PCIe x4

    Aaeon’s barebones, semi-rugged “EPIC-KBS9-PUC” embedded PC runs on 6th or 7th Gen Core CPUs with up to 4x GbE and 2x serial plus 4x USB, mSATA, dual displays, and optional mini-PCIe, PCIe x4, or 2.5-inch HDD.

    Aaeon has spun last year’s EPIC form-factor EPIC-KBS board into an embedded system for light industrial duty including “automated warehouse robots, retail POS systems, and even a 3D printer for cakes.” The barebones, 216 x 180 x 65mm system will presumably let you load either Linux or Windows on a range of 6th (Skylake) or 7th (Kaby Lake) generation Intel Core CPUs up to 65W.

  • How to install Microsoft Visual Studio Code (VS Code) on Ubuntu [Ed: Jack Wallen pushing Microsoft agenda and helps Microsoft impose proprietary software, MSVS, on GNU/Linux users. Wallen should know better than this, but LF now pays him.]
  • Apple Is Finally Fixing the Keyboards on MacBook Pros

    Apple’s newest MacBook Pros, which are being announced today and include significant bumps in power and performance, are still using Apple’s third-generation “butterfly” keyboard. But the company says these keyboards have a change in the physical material that exists within the butterfly mechanism that will address some of the issues that MacBook users have been experiencing. The company declined to say exactly what the material change was. [...]

  • Flex PCB Fabrication

    I’ve gotten a few people asking me where I get my flex PCBs fabricated, so I figured I’d make a note here. I get my flex PCBs (and actually most of my PCBs, except laser-drilled microvia) done at a medium-sized shop in China called King Credie. Previously it was a bit hard to talk about them because they only took orders via e-mail and in Chinese, but they recently opened an English-friendly online website for quotation and order placement. There’s still a few wrinkles in the website, but for a company whose specialty is decidedly not “web services” and with English as a second language, it’s usable.

    Knowing your PCB vendor is advantageous for a boutique hardware system integrators like me. It’s a bit like the whole farm-to-table movement — you get better results when you know where your materials are coming from. I’ve probably been working with King Credie for almost a decade now, and I try to visit their facility and have drinks with the owner on a regular basis. I really like their CEO, he’s been a circuit board fabrication nerd since college, and he’s living his dream of building his own factory and learning all he can about interesting and boutique PCB processes.

  • TechnicalDebt

     

    Thinking of this as paying interest versus paying of principal can help decide which cruft to tackle. If I have a terrible area of the code base, one that's a nightmare to change, it's not a problem if I don't have to modify it. I only trigger an interest payment when I have to work with that part of the software (this is a place where the metaphor breaks down, since financial interest payments are triggered by the passage of time). So crufty but stable areas of code can be left alone. In contrast, areas of high activity need a zero-tolerance attitude to cruft, because the interest payments are cripplingly high. This is especially important since cruft accumulates where developers make changes without paying attention to internal quality - the more changes, the greater risk of cruft building up.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • WannaCry? Hundreds of US schools still haven’t patched servers

    But cities aren't the only highly vulnerable targets to be found by would-be attackers. There are hundreds of thousands of Internet-connected Windows systems in the United States that still appear to be vulnerable to an exploit of Microsoft Windows' Server Message Block version 1 (SMB v. 1) file sharing protocol, despite repeated public warnings to patch systems following the worldwide outbreak of the WannaCry cryptographic malware two years ago. And based on data from the Shodan search engine and other public sources, hundreds of them—if not thousands—are servers in use at US public school systems.

  • Google stored some passwords in plain text for fourteen years

    In a blog post today, Google disclosed that it recently discovered a bug that caused some portion of G Suite users to have their passwords stored in plain text. The bug has been around since 2005, though Google says that it can’t find any evidence that anybody’s password was improperly accessed. It’s resetting any passwords that might be affected and letting G Suite administrators know about the issue.

    G Suite is the corporate version of Gmail and Google’s other apps, and apparently the bug came about in this product because of a feature designed specifically for companies. Early on, it was possible for your company administrator for G Suite apps to set user passwords manually — say, before a new employee came on board — and if they did, the admin console would store those passwords in plain text instead of hashing them. Google has since removed that capability from administrators.

  • Notifying administrators about unhashed password storage
  • Google Disappoints Yet Again: Stored Some Passwords In Plain Text For 14 Years

    G Suite users were taken aback yesterday when Google disclosed that it stored some passwords for Enterprise G Suite users in plain text for 14 years.

    In a blog post, the search giant mentioned that the passwords were encrypted but not hashed, which means that Google employees had complete access to them. However, the company says that there is no evidence that passwords were illegally accessed by anyone or misused.

  • Stable Version Of Tor Browser For Android Now Available On Play Store

    After eight months of testing, a stable release for the Tor browser has arrived on the Play Store. The new Android browser now brings Tor features directly into a standalone browser, replacing the Orbot/Orfox as the main way to connect to the Tor network via Android devices.

    The stable version (v8.5) of Tor for Android routes your web traffic through the Tor network — a web of encrypted computers spread worldwide.

8 Best Free Linux Video Converters

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Given there are many different video formats available, a free video converter is an extremely useful piece of software. The best video converters make the conversion process simple, and support a wide number of different codecs and formats.

Video conversion is a narrower term for transcoding. Transcoding is the process of the conversion of digital data (typically video and audio files) from one format to another. It involves extracting tracks from a digital media file, decoding the tracks, filtering, encoding, and then multiplexing the new tracks into a new container. Transcoding will reduce the quality of the tracks unless lossless formats are used.

There are many reasons to transcode media files. Some popular examples include the ability to convert files so that they are supported on a target device, and at the same time removing commercials, and reducing the file size. While transcoding is a very CPU intensive task, modern processors with a high number of cores offer impressive conversion rates provided the transcoding software supports multi-core architectures.

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OpenJDK 8 and 11: Still in safe hands

Filed under
Development

In 2018, Oracle announced that it would only provide free public updates and auto-updates of Java SE 8 for commercial users until the end of January 2019. Java 8 is a very important platform, used by millions of programmers, so this was a big deal. The Java community needed to fill the gap.

In February of this year, I was appointed as the new Lead of the OpenJDK 8 Update Releases Project. A couple of weeks later, I was appointed the new Lead of the OpenJDK 11 Updates Project. This is an important milestone in the history of OpenJDK and of Java SE because it’s the first time that a non-Oracle employee has led the current long-term OpenJDK release project. JDK 8 is still a much-used Java release in industry, and JDK 11 is the current long-term maintenance release.

It’s now a couple of weeks after the first releases of JDK8u and JDK11u on my watch. I think the process went pretty well, although it was not entirely smooth sailing for the developers. Having said that, we got our releases out on the day, as planned, and so far we’ve seen no major problems.

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How to advance your career by contributing to open source projects

Filed under
OSS

In 2017, I wrote my (so-far) most popular article of all time, "The Impact GitHub is Having on Your Software Career, Right Now…," on Medium. In that article, I cast the vision for how you can develop your career through open source contributions. It clearly struck a nerve—it got 382 points and 237 comments on Hacker News. Many of the comments hated on it so hard—they disagreed with my main premise—but I felt they had missed the point. At the time I was a recruiter with 10 years of engineering experience, working at Red Hat.

There is nothing I love more than a challenge, so I went "deep cover." I quit my job as a recruiter and got a job as a software engineer in a pure closed-source company that uses BitBucket and has PCI-compliant security. Fourteen months later, I got hired by Camunda to work as the developer advocate for Zeebe, a workflow engine for orchestrating microservices, purely based on my open source contributions while working at that job. I just did everything I advised readers to do in the comments of my original Medium article.

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Antergos Linux has been Discontinued

Filed under
News

Beginner-friendly Arch Linux based distribution Antergos has announced that the project is being discontinued.
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OSS: Molly de Blanc, ownCloud, Document Foundation, Red Hat Summit, Github Lockin and Contributor License Agreements

Filed under
OSS
  • Molly de Blanc: remuneration

    I am a leader in free software. As evidence for this claim, I like to point out that I once finagled an invitation to the Google OSCON luminaries dinner, and was once invited to a Facebook party for open source luminaries.

    In spite of my humor, I am a leader and have taken on leadership roles for a number of years. I was in charge of guests of honor (and then some) at Penguicon for several years at the start of my involvement in FOSS. I’m a delegate on the Debian Outreach team. My participation in Debian A-H is a leadership role as well. I’m president of the OSI Board of Directors. I’ve given keynote presentations on two continents, and talks on four. And that’s not even getting into my paid professional life. My compensated labor has been nearly exclusively for nonprofits.

    Listing my credentials in such concentration feels a bit distasteful, but sometimes I think it’s important. Right now, I want to convey that I know a thing or two about free/open source leadership. I’ve even given talks on that.

    Other than my full-time job, my leadership positions come without material renumeration — that is to say I don’t get paid for any of them — though I’ve accepted many a free meal and have had travel compensated on a number of occasions. I am not interested in getting paid for my leadership work, though I have come to believe that more leadership positions should be paid.

  • ownCloud Server 10.2 Release – Power to the Users

    ownCloud 10.2 introduces advanced sharing permissions, automatic synchronization in federated clouds and improved rights for users.

  • The Document Foundation and LibreOffice Online at OW2con 2019

    OW2con 2019 is the annual open source event bringing together the OW2 community, technology experts, software architects, IT project managers and decision-makers from around the world. The conference will be hosted by the Orange Gardens Innovation Center, Paris-Châtillon, on June 12-13, 2019.

  • Highlights Video of Red Hat Summit Keynotes

    If you missed Red Hat Summit, you should not despair: we’ve compiled a highlights video that captures the breadth and depth of what’s happening in the Red Hat OpenShift Ecosystem and beyond. From Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, to IBM CEO Ginni Rometty, the keynotes at the show demonstrated the widespread support and enthusiasm Red Hat has built across many technical domains. If you’ve got time, there will be dozens of videos from the show popping up on our YouTube Channel, keynotes or otherwise, over the coming weeks. For now, however, here’s the highlight reel featuring appearances from IBM, Delta, Exxon Mobil, Lockheed Martin, Volkswagen, Deutsche Bank, Microsoft, Kohl’s, OneMain, UPS, NVIDIA, HCA Healthcare, Boston Children’s Hospital, Optus, BP, Emirates NBD, and BMW. And there were a lot more customers speaking. Just take a look:

  • Top 100 Most Valuable GitHub Repositories [Ed: FOSSBytes promoting the dangerous perception if not pure propaganda that FOSS does not exist or does not count until or unless Microsoft owns and controls it]
  • Transfer Ssh Keys From Github To Server
  • What You Should Know About Contributor License Agreements In Open Source Projects

    An open source project comprises a community of software developers that agree to develop a common software-code base and make it freely available but subject to certain license requirements. The resulting software is typically vetted by multiple contributors to the open source project and may be further updated and improved based on their contributions. Open source software is prevalent in many popular software products, including Mozilla Firefox, Wordpress, GNU/Linux, Android mobile devices, Open Java Development Kit (OpenJDK), and even commercial products like Apple’s OS X.

systemd Clocks In At More Than 1.2 Million Lines

Filed under
Linux

Five years ago today was the story on Phoronix how the systemd source tree was approaching 550k lines so curiosity got the best of me to see how large is the systemd Git repository today. Well, now it's over 1.2 million lines.

After surpassing one million lines in 2017, when running GitStats on the systemd Git repository today it's coming in at 1,207,302 lines. Those 1.2 million lines are spread across 3,260 files and made over 40,057 commits from nearly 1,400 different authors.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Huawei's alternative OS to Android set to roll out as early as fall

Filed under
OS

Reports have circulated about Huawei's efforts to build an alternative OS to Android for at least 3 years at this point. It's not known if the software will be a fork off of AOSP, which the company is free to use in any case under Google's open-source license. Huawei may also elect to use another base and implement an Android runtime as the Unix-derived BlackBerry 10 OS did. In any case, we're all still playing the guessing game.

Yu's statements — which were made to a quasi-public WeChat group this morning — followed a media briefing with the company's founder, Ren Zhengfei, on how it will handle its mounting challenges. Both executives have attempted to calm animosity coming from fervent fans and nationalists alike who have been ditching Apple products in favor of the company's, saying that patriots don't necessarily use Huawei products.

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Spyder 4.0 takes a big step closer with the release of Beta 2!

Filed under
Development
Software

It has been almost two months since I joined Quansight in April, to start working on Spyder maintenance and development. So far, it has been a very exciting and rewarding journey under the guidance of long time Spyder maintainer Carlos Córdoba. This is the first of a series of blog posts we will be writing to showcase updates on the development of Spyder, new planned features and news on the road to Spyder 4.0 and beyond.

First off, I would like to give a warm welcome to Edgar Margffoy, who recently joined Quansight and will be working with the Spyder team to take its development even further. Edgar has been a core Spyder developer for more than two years now, and we are very excited to have his (almost) full-time commitment to the project.

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Performance Impact of Serious CPU Defects

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
Security
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More in Tux Machines

Programming: GCC, C++, Python and PHP

  • AMD GCN GPU Target Continuing To Improve For The GCC 10 Compiler
    With the recent release of the GCC 9 stable compiler there is the initial "AMD GCN" GPU target/back-end merged. However, for this GNU Compiler Collection release the AMD GCN target isn't all that useful but continued work on it gives us hope of seeing it in good shape for next year's GCC 10 release. With the GCC 9.1 release, the AMD GCN back-end can only handle running basic single-threaded programs... Not exactly useful for graphics cards. The GCC 9 code supports targeting the Fiji and Vega 10 GCN instruction set architecture.
  • IBM Begins Plumbing "Future" Processor Into GCC Compiler - POWER10?
    IBM engineers have landed initial support for "-mcpu=future" into the GCC compiler... As they say in the commit message, "a future architecture level, as yet unnamed." This IBM "future" processor is being added to the POWER architecture code succeeding POWER9. More than likely, its the early enablement work for POWER10.
  • Little Trouble in Big Data – Part 1
    A few months ago, we received a phone call from a bioinformatics group at a European university. The problem they were having appeared very simple. They wanted to know how to usemmap() to be able to load a large data set into RAM at once. OK I thought, no problem, I can handle that one. Turns out this has grown into a complex and interesting exercise in profiling and threading. The background is that they are performing Markov-Chain Monte Carlo simulations by sampling at random from data sets containing SNP (pronounced “snips”) genetic markers for a selection of people. It boils down to a large 2D matrix of floats where each column corresponds to an SNP and each row to a person. They provided some small and medium sized data sets for me to test with, but their full data set consists of 500,000 people with 38 million SNP genetic markers!
  • Why precompiled headers do (not) improve C++ compile times
    Would you like your C++ code to compile twice as fast (or more)? Yeah, so would I. Who wouldn't. C++ is notorious for taking its sweet time to get compiled. I never really cared about PCHs when I worked on KDE, I think I might have tried them once for something and it didn't seem to do a thing. In 2012, while working on LibreOffice, I noticed its build system used to have PCH support, but it had been nuked, with the usual poor OOo/LO style of a commit message stating the obvious (what) without bothering to state the useful (why). For whatever reason, that caught my attention, reportedly PCHs saved a lot of build time with MSVC, so I tried it and it did. And me having brought the PCH support back from the graveyard means that e.g. the Calc module does not take 5:30m to build on a (very) powerful machine, but only 1:45m. That's only one third of the time. In line with my previous experience, on Linux that did nothing. I made the build system support also PCH with GCC and Clang, because it was there and it was simple to support it too, but there was no point. I don't think anybody has ever used that for real. Then, about a year ago, I happened to be working on a relatively small C++ project that used some kind of an obscure build system called Premake I had never heard of before. While fixing something in it I noticed it also had PCH support, so guess what, I of course enabled it for the project. It again made the project build faster on Windows. And, on Linux, it did too. Color me surprised.
  • KDAB at CppCon 2019
    CppCon is the annual, week-long face-to-face gathering for the entire C++ community – the biggest C++ event in the world. This year, for the first time, CppCon takes place in the stunning Gaylord Rockies Hotel and Convention Center in Aurora, Colorado, very near Denver International Airport.
  • Clear Linux Discovers Another AVX2/AVX512 Fix/Optimization To Yield Better Performance
    For those running a system with AVX-512 support, Clear Linux builds as of this week should be yielding even better performance on top of their existing AVX2 and AVX-512 optimizations. The Intel developers working on Clear Linux uncovered an issue how the new GCC 9 compiler has been building the important libm math library poorly in AVX2/AVX-512 mode. This poor code compilation yielded slowdowns in various math functions since the switch to the GCC 9 compiler.
  • Building Machine Learning Data Pipeline using Apache Spark
  • It is easier to gather package meta-data from PyPI package ecosystem, once know the right way
  • Python 2.7 vs Python 3.4 ─ What should Python Beginners choose?
  • Be Quick or Eat Potatoes: A Newbie’s Guide to PyCon
  • Remote Development with Wing Pro
    In this issue of Wing Tips we take a quick look at Wing Pro's remote development capabilities.
  • Data School: Data science best practices with pandas (video tutorial)
  • PHP extensions status with upcoming PHP 7.4

PostgreSQL 12 Beta 1 Released!

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces that the first beta release of PostgreSQL 12 is now available for download. This release contains previews of all features that will be available in the final release of PostgreSQL 12, though some details of the release could change before then. In the spirit of the open source PostgreSQL community, we strongly encourage you to test the new features of PostgreSQL 12 in your database systems to help us eliminate any bugs or other issues that may exist. While we do not advise you to run PostgreSQL 12 Beta 1 in your production environments, we encourage you to find ways to run your typical application workloads against this beta release. Read more Also: PostgreSQL 12 Beta Released With Performance Improvements

ZFS On Linux 0.8 Released With Native Encryption, TRIM, Device Removal

The feature-packed and long-desired ZFS On Linux 0.8 release has finally taken place! ZoL 0.8 is out there! ZFS On Linux 0.8 has debuted today as the newest feature release for this ZFS file-system port for Linux systems. ZFS On Linux 0.8 supports up through the latest Linux 5.1 stable series while still working going back to the Linux 2.6.32 kernel days, but the SIMD support isn't available on stock 5.0+ kernels leading to big performance penalties. Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers: Blobs, Snapcraft and Arronax

  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Bundle NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver Packages As Part Of Its ISO
    For Ubuntu 19.10 the developers are adding the NVIDIA driver packages onto the ISO. The NVIDIA binary drivers won't be activated by default, but will be present on the install media to make it easier to enable post-install. The open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" drivers will remain the default for NVIDIA graphics on new Ubuntu installations, but this change is positioning the mainline and legacy NVIDIA proprietary drivers onto the Ubuntu ISO so that they can be easily obtained locally post-install. The main driver here is allowing users to enable the NVIDIA proprietary graphics on Ubuntu even if you don't have an Internet connection. NVIDIA has already okay'ed the distribution of their driver packages with the Ubuntu ISO.
  • Snapcraft parts & plugins
    Last week, we published Introduction to snapcraft, a tutorial that provided a detailed overview of the snap build process. We touched on the concepts like snap ecosystem components, snapcraft command line, snapcraft.yaml syntax, and more. We’d like to expand on the first lesson, and today, we are going to talk about parts and plugins, used in the build process of snaps.
  • Arronax – Graphical Tool to Create Desktop Launcher in Ubuntu
    For those who want to manually create desktop shortcut launcher in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 19.04, Arronax is a good choice with graphical user interface. Other than creating .desktop file via Linux command, Arronax offers a graphical interface to create (and also edit) desktop shortcut for application, executable file, or URL.