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Wednesday, 26 Feb 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry A Fishy Tale harshasrisri 01/05/2011 - 2:11pm
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Blog entry Gnome3 is a YES revdjenk 08/04/2011 - 12:27pm
Blog entry Mageia 1 Alpha2 -- A Status Report gfranken 27/03/2011 - 3:59am
Blog entry Looking for help to bring a new app to the world bigbearomaha 09/03/2011 - 1:35pm
Blog entry motherboard srlinuxx 2 06/03/2011 - 6:32pm
Blog entry More Hardware troubles srlinuxx 03/03/2011 - 9:19pm
Blog entry PCLinuxOS on the BBC Texstar 1 03/03/2011 - 9:51pm
Blog entry weirdness: puppy & wd-40 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 4:07am

GIMP 2.10.18 Officially Released, Here’s What’s New

Filed under
GNU

GIMP 2.10.18 comes three months after version 2.10.14, which probably most of you out there are running on your GNU/Linux distributions, but the development team released version 2.10.16 a week ago without announcing anything official. Now, GIMP 2.10.18 is here, and we finally have details about the new features that were implemented during this cycle.

Without any further ado, the highlights of the GIMP 2.10.18 release include a new 3D Transform tool to let users rotate and pan items in 3D space (you can check it out in action below), a new high-contrast symbolic theme, a new “Composited Preview” option for most transformation tools, and the ability to group tools by default in the toolbox, which is enabled by default after you update to this version.

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Claws Mail 3.17.5 Open-Source Email Client Released with New Features

Filed under
OSS

Coming seven months after the previous release, Claws Mail 3.17.5 is here to implement colour syntax highlighting support for inline Git patch attachments, which can be configured via the “Other” tab in the Display/Colors page under General Preferences.

It also adds the ability to scroll with the keyboard in the LiteHtml viewer plugin and the “Re-edit” message context menu option was reimplemented and will be visible in the Drafts folder.

Furthermore, Claws Mail 3.17.5 adds support for two extra date header formats, namely weekday, month, day, hh, mm, ss, year, zone and weekday, month, day, hh, mm, ss, year, and lets users configure the “summary_from_show” hidden preference from the user interface via the “Message List” tab in the Display/Summaries under General Preferences.

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Even better screencast with GNOME on Wayland

Filed under
GNOME

With last week’s release of PipeWire 3, and Mutter’s subsequent adaptation to depend on it, I decided to revive something I have started to work on a few months ago. The results can be found in this merge request.

PipeWire 0.3 brings one very interesting and important feature to the game: it can import DMA-Buf file descriptors, and share it with clients. On the client side, one easy way to make use of this feature is simply by using the pipewiresrc source in GStreamer.

The key aspect of DMA-Buf sharing is that we avoid copying images between GPU and CPU memory. On a 4K monitor, which is what I’m using these days, that means it avoids needlessly copying almost 2GB of pixels every second.

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The Current RADV+ACO Mesa Driver Performance For February 2020

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

As it's been a few weeks since last running a Mesa open-source driver comparison on AMD Radeon graphics hardware, here are some fresh Mesa 20.1-devel benchmarks just a few weeks so far after the Mesa 20.0 branching. These latest Mesa 20.1-devel benchmarks were also run a second time when enabling the RADV ACO shader compiler back-end that's been a focus by Valve developers in enhancing the Linux gaming experience. These results are compared to Mesa 19.2.8 as a baseline for the open-source driver support offered out-of-the-box by Ubuntu 19.10.

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Tiny, Linux-powered Sitara module has dev kit with dual GbE

Filed under
Linux

MYIR’s 50 x 40mm, -40 to 85°C tolerant “MYC-C335X-GW” module runs Linux on TI’s AM335x with up to 1GB RAM and 4GB eMMC. It can be extended with a “MYD-C335X-GW” carrier with GbE plus optional SFP.

We don’t see many Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x boards anymore, but if you’re still interested in this low-power, industrial-focused Cortex-A8 SoC, which powers all the BeagleBones except the new BeagleBone AI, MYIR has you covered. The 50 x 40mm (2,000 sq. mm) MYC-C335X-GW module is its smallest AM335x module yet, edging out the 65 x 35mm (2,275 sq. mm) MCC-AM335X-Y and larger, 70 x 50mm MYC-AM335X. (MYIR also supports other TI Sitara SoCs, such as the Cortex-A9 based AM437x in its MYC-C437X module.)

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Whiskey Lake SBC has triple GbE and dual HDMI ports

Filed under
Linux

Like most of its 3.5-inch Whiskey Lake competitors, the Wafer-ULT5 offers up to 32GB DDR4-2400 and supports triple independent displays. While most of its rivals provide dual DisplayPorts or combinations of DP and HDMI, IEI is the first to provide dual standard HDMI ports, which are accompanied by an LVDS connector.

Like ASRock’s SBC-350, Commell’s LE-37N, and Ibase’s IB919, the Wafer-ULT5 provides 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2 host ports at up to 10Gbps. (Congatec’s Conga-JC370 has three, including its Type-C port.)

The Wafer-ULT5 is equipped with an M.2 A-key 2230 socket and a full-size mini-PCIe slot. The others either offer the same combo or dual M.2 slots except for the Conga-JC370, which supplies 3x M.2 plus a mini-PCIe. No OS support was listed, but Linux should fit in just fine here.

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Linux Gamers And Creators Should Pay Attention To Arch-Based Salient OS

Filed under
OS
Linux
Gaming

Sometimes our field of vision or limited experience restricts us from seeing worthy alternatives. That’s especially true when it comes to desktop Linux; there is no shortage of quality Linux operating systems to test out. So when I argued here that System76’s Pop!_OS is perfect for gamers and produced this video demonstrating it, there were two passionate camps in the comments section. One side voiced cheerful agreement, but the other side basically said “Clearly you haven’t tried Salient OS.”

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Google helps devs speed up Firefox with open source Lighthouse extension

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
OSS

Google has released a Firefox version of its Lighthouse browser extension, giving developers an easy way to test the performance of websites and web apps.

The open source extension makes use of the PageSpeed Insights API, and the new release brings Firefox in line with Chrome which has had a version of the extension for a few years now. The ultimate aim is to make it easier for developers to improve app and page performance by encouraging better practices.

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Open source licenses: What, which, and why

Filed under
OSS

Most people have at least heard of open source software by now—and even have a fairly good idea of what it is. Its own luminaries argue incessantly about what to call it—with camps arguing for everything from Free to Libre to Open Source and every possible combination of the above—but the one thing every expert agrees on is that it's not open source (or whatever) if it doesn't have a clearly attributed license.

You can't just publicly dump a bunch of source code without a license and say "whatever—it's there, anybody can get it." Due to the way copyright law works in most of the world, freely available code without an explicitly declared license is copyright by the author, all rights reserved. This means it's just plain unsafe to use unlicensed code, published or not—there's nothing stopping the author from coming after you and suing for royalties if you start using it.

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Stable Kernels: 5.5.6, 5.4.22, and 4.19.106

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.5.6

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.5.6 kernel.

    All users of the 5.5 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.5.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.5.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.22
  • Linux 4.19.106

KDSoap 1.9.0 released

Filed under
KDE

KD SOAP is a tool for creating client applications for web services.

The release of 1.9.0 brings a fair number of improvements and fixes, as the following text describes.

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Ethical Code Hosting Services in 2020

Filed under
Development
Software

I was really inspired by Free Software Foundation's list of ethical repositories in which I saw GitLab.com service there among other old longstanding services. The Foundation (often called FSF) is a serious organization with long consideration if they wish to update that list. However, in fact, there are many more services coming by time and now there are several interesting ones worth to try and enjoy. Although I myself am not a programmer, but code hosting is not unfamiliar to me, as a free software community member (just like you all, dear readers) I often get so many useful information and sometimes submit bug report to projects I love. You can, for example, take information here as reference to host a Git server software at your home as you see perhaps many serious projects also using it. As an author and mere free software user, I hope this list could be useful for everybody and particularly for programmers. Happy hacking!

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Games: Space Grunts 2, Death and Taxes, Oxygen Not Included

Filed under
Gaming
  • Space Grunts 2 shows how versatile a deck-builder can be and it's good

    With how popular deck-builders have become, it's no surprise to see many developers have a go at it. Orangepixel have with Space Grunts 2 and after playing it, I'm really enjoying it. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    Currently in Early Access, released there back in September 2019 the developer seems to just keep adding more to it nearly every week. Given how many updates it's had, I took it for a spin to get some early thoughts on it. Space Grunts 2 has been, at least so far, one of the most unique feeling roguelikes thanks to their deck-building mechanic. Like other great roguelikes it's turn-based so nothing happens until you move, you take turns on the combat, and if you die and you need to start again. However, as you travel you collect cards which are you abilities.

  • The afterlife is an office job of choosing who lives and dies in Death and Taxes

    Placeholder Gameworks (great name!) have just recently released Death and Taxes, a game set in the afterlife where you take on the role of the Grim Reaper only it's not quite what you expect. Note: Key sent by the developer to our Steam Curator.

    Rather than go out dressed in a hooded-robe with a great big scythe, it's an office job. You get to give the stamp of approval on who lives and dies to keep chaos in check, based on people in life-threatening situations with your actions having certain consequences based on who sticks around. Inspired by the likes of "Papers, Please", "Reigns" and "Beholder".

  • Oxygen Not Included still 'fully in development' with first DLC hopefully this Autumn

    Klei Entertainment have given an update on their plans for continued support of the colony survival/building game Oxygen Not Included and they confirmed it's still 'fully in development'.

    Although it left Early Access back in July last year, since then they've been somewhat quiet on their wider plans. Not entirely silent though as they did release the "Meep's Manadatory Recreation Content Pack" free update, along with a big update to the Unity version used. Thanks to a recent roadmap post, we now know what their further plans are.

    For the first major DLC, they said it's going to be "quite sizable" with new game systems included. However, they're not giving a definite timeline on it as they're still testing and iterating on their ideas. They did at least give something of a release window, with something to show in the Summer to possibly release in the Autumn.

The Future of the Arch Linux Project Leader

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Some of you may know me from the days when I was much more involved in Arch, but most of you probably just know me as a name on the website. I’ve been with Arch for some time, taking the leadership of this beast over from Judd back in 2007. But, as these things often go, my involvement has slid down to minimal levels over time. It’s high time that changes.

Arch Linux needs involved leadership to make hard decisions and direct the project where it needs to go. And I am not in a position to do this.

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today's leftovers (GNU/Linux, Open Access and Openwashing)

Filed under
Misc
  • Why Huawei Without Google Is Not The End, But The Start Of Something New [Ed: Huawei already puts GNU/Linux on some major products]

    Last year, Huawei strapped in for a rough ride when US President Donald Trump called for a trade ban on the Chinese tech giant.

    Huawei was placed on the US’ Entity List since May 2019, stopping them from doing business with American companies unless granted approval by the US Government.

    The move essentially cut Huawei off from their US supply of parts, such as the latest chips by Intel and Qualcomm — but the greatest impact felt was definitely losing access to Google’s licensed software, apps and services.

    The one question boggling fans and users was what would happen when future Huawei phones come without Google’s Android and Google Mobile Services (GMS) like Gmail, Google Chrome and Google Maps?

  • 27th Time The Charm? Intel SGX Enclaves Support For Linux Revved Again

    For four years we have been seeing Intel Secure Guard Extensions (SGX) bring-up for the Linux kernel and that work continues with the Intel SGX Enclaves support now having been sent out for review twenty-seven times as it tries to work its way towards the mainline Linux kernel.

  • X.Org Server Lands Fixes For XWayland Full-Screen Support
  • Ksnip is a cross-platform, open source screenshot tool with many annotation options

    The program supports five modes for capturing screenshots. Rectangular Area is the default one which was mentioned in the above paragraph. The second option is Last Rectangular Area, selecting this option directly captures the content inside the previous area that you chose. This is a rather unusual option, and quite a useful one as it allows you to retake a screenshot or take another one in case something changed inside the rectangle.

    The Full Screen mode can be used to save a snapshot of the entire screen. What's special here is that, Ksnip can capture the screen from all connected monitors. So, you can use it to take wide screenshots from videos, games and maybe even set the captured image as your desktop background wallpaper.

  • Open Source textbooks saving Beaufort County Community College students money
  • Open-source textbooks save Beaufort students over $50,000 per semester

    Open source textbooks are helping students at Beaufort County Community College save money, making the cost of their education less expensive and helping stretch financial aid or scholarship money they may be receiving.

    The average student will spend over $1,200 on textbooks per year. Since initial adoption by Ashleigh Howard, Lead Professor for the Social & Behavioral Sciences Department, the books have been adopted by other professors across campus, cumulatively saving students over $50,000 per semester. Currently, cultural geography, history, criminal justice, sociology and Spanish classes are using the books.

  • UBank puts open source accessibility kit on GitHub [Ed: This feeds a proprietary software trap of Microsoft for openwashing purposes and to make matters worse, it is not accessible]
  • Precious Plastic open source recycling project takes a new perspective toward waste

    “Plastic is a precious and valuable material. It’s just been kind of designed, used and marketed in the wrong way, in our view,” explained Precious Plastic business guy (yes, that’s his real title) Joseph Klatt. The company’s business guy is originally from Ohio but moved to the Netherlands where the project is headquartered.

  • The open source platform empowering creatives to turn recycling into craft [Ed: This use of the term "open source" may be misleading]

    In response to this, Hakkens looked to the large-scale recycling plants that operate across the world. Their huge industrial machines then formed the base of the Precious Plastic operation.

    “He began recreating these machines on a small scale, putting the blueprints and assembly instructions online for others to use,” continues Elleke.

    Once built, users can create with the waste plastic however they need, making anything from furniture and household goods, to bricks and other modular structures. The possibilities, she says, are endless: “Anything made with plastic, can be made with recycled plastic.”

    According to Elleke, the whole idea was to “take a global problem, and find a community solution.” In giving a second, third or infinite number of lives to waste plastic, Hakkens and his team provide local designers, craftspeople and creatives with a new material and profit stream.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Dell EMC Streaming Data Platform integrates open source technology

    Dell combines several open source streaming data technologies, including Apache Kafka, Apache Flink and Pravega, to create a new streaming data platform.

  • Instaclustr Achieves PCI-DSS Certification for its Managed Apache Cassandra and Kafka Offerings on AWS
  • Democratizing space exploration with new technologies

    Democratization means nothing without the support of and collaboration with public consumers and talent. Open source software, whose source code anyone can peruse, modify and contribute to, allows NewSpace industries to engage directly with the public through hands-on, widely accessible opportunities that help develop and improve technology.

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a big proponent of these open access projects, finding that they build online and in-real-life communities and help shape the future of NewSpace tech.

    These open access resources solicit submissions from all over the world, inviting users to send their personal research concept to space. Participants, for example, can rent time on a cubesat constellation (similar to buying time on a cloud computing system). Here they can interact in open science communities with access to libraries and maker studios where users can utilize MIT’s already vast research portfolio. On top of it all, the initiative offers other integrated support systems like a STEAM outreach program with educational resources, curriculum and DIY hacker guidelines for climate-smart cubesats.

  • Should I Use Open Source Instead Of Demand Planning Software For Forecasting?

    You’re not going to get advanced modeling like machine learning in Excel. Excel can’t handle large data sets either, making it clunky and problematic.

  • Collaboration Over Competition: How Companies Benefit from Open Innovation

    More and more technology companies are adopting open innovation initiatives. This is largely due to the realization of the benefits of working with outside experts to gain external perspectives and insights. This situation wherein an organization thinks beyond its internal resources for innovation and collaborates with external resources is known as open innovation. Open innovation is an opportunity for the company to utilize those external ideas and use them to develop innovative products and services. It may seem simple, but there is more to the collaboration process than just brainstorming.

  • An Open Source Ebike

    In the ebike world, there are two paths. The first is a homemade kit bike with motors and controllers from China. The second is a prebuilt bike from a manufacturer like Giant, with motors and controllers from China, which will be half as fast and cost three times as much. The choice is obvious, and there are other benefits to taking the first path as well, such as using this equipment which now has an open source firmware option.

    [...]

    This new open source firmware for the TSDZ2 further improves on the ride by improving the motor responsiveness, improving battery efficiency, and opening up the ability to use any of a number of color displays. (More information is available on a separate Wiki.)

  • RedNotebook 2.17

    RedNotebook is a modern desktop journal. It lets you format, tag and search your entries. You can also add pictures, links and customizable templates, spell check your notes, and export to plain text, HTML, Latex or PDF. RedNotebook is Free Software under the GPL.

  • Monitoring Your Network with Time Series: How Open Source Can Help

    Network monitoring is critical to all IoT Operations and for security and Time Series can be a secret cheat code to keeping that network all shipshape. Learn how, in an upcoming webinar from InfluxData.

  • Open in Browser is a Firefox extension that opens PDFs, images directly instead of downloading them

    I installed the add-on and tried accessing the same URLs. A new prompt appeared and Open in Browser detected them as "server sent MIME". It had an option to open it with Firefox. This saves you the trouble of downloading and opening it. Another advantage is that your downloads folder doesn't get cluttered.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • What developers need to know about domain-specific languages

    A domain-specific language (DSL) is a language meant for use in the context of a particular domain. A domain could be a business context (e.g., banking, insurance, etc.) or an application context (e.g., a web application, database, etc.) In contrast, a general-purpose language (GPL) can be used for a wide range of business problems and applications.

    A DSL does not attempt to please all. Instead, it is created for a limited sphere of applicability and use, but it's powerful enough to represent and address the problems and solutions in that sphere. A good example of a DSL is HTML. It is a language for the web application domain. It can't be used for, say, number crunching, but it is clear how widely used HTML is on the web.

    A GPL creator does not know where the language might be used or the problems the user intends to solve with it. So, a GPL is created with generic constructs that potentially are usable for any problem, solution, business, or need. Java is a GPL, as it's used on desktops and mobile devices, embedded in the web across banking, finance, insurance, manufacturing, etc., and more.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 Rev 1.2 Fixes USB-C Power Issues, Improves SD Card Resilience

    The first Raspberry Pi 4 boards suffered from a poor USB-C power supply compatibility due to issues for the power circuitry. That means if you bought the official USB-C power supply you had no issues, but if you wanted to re-use a spare USB-C power supply or incompatible cable, you may be out of luck.

  • OpenVPN setup

    For historical reasons, I run a bunch of IT infrastructure at home. Mindful of sayings like the cloud is just other people's computers I’ve installed jails on my home FreeBSD NAS / server / router to deliver a bunch of services. Mail, for instance, and an LDAP server to experiment with, and something for package building.

  • Using C and C++ for data science

    While languages like Python and R are increasingly popular for data science, C and C++ can be a strong choice for efficient and effective data science. In this article, we will use C99 and C++11 to write a program that uses the Anscombe’s quartet dataset, which I'll explain about next.

    I wrote about my motivation for continually learning languages in an article covering Python and GNU Octave, which is worth reviewing. All of the programs are meant to be run on the command line, not with a graphical user interface (GUI). The full examples are available in the polyglot_fit repository.

  • PyDev of the Week: Hameer Abbasi

    This week we welcome Hameer Abbasi as our PyDev of the Week! Hameer works on the PyData Sparse project.

    [...]

    I was doing a Hilfswissenschaftler job (sort of like a Research Assistant in the USA), and there I was presented the problem of scaling a sparse system to a larger space. I discovered the PyData/Sparse project back then (it was in Matthew Rocklin’s personal repository at the time), and was immediately fascinated by the idea of computational gains to be had if one moved to a sparse representation. I’m now the maintainer for that project, and I’m grateful I chose that path, as it landed me a talk at SciPy 2018 and a client in the form of Quansight.

Red Hat: Systemd, PulseAudio, Survey and OpenStack

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Where I Stand on Systemd

    Once I turn to design considerations and technological benefits, however, I quickly bog down. The Unix philosophy of one utility to do one thing very well sounds admirable in theory, and perhaps on the administrative level it works well. Yet, I have heard few if any complaints that large apps like SE Linux or AppArmor violate the Unix philosophy, and on the desktop, apps like LibreOffice or Krita are clear violators. Could it be that some projects require a different approach to be effective?

    As a user, my initial tendency is to applaude Init Freedom’s rejection of “this one-size-fits-all vision” that led to the general acceptance of systemd in the major distributions. Yet as I think further, I wonder how practical supporting multiple init systems might be.

    In the recent Debian general resolution on systemd, both sides maintained that expecting maintainers to support multiple init systems would seriously add to the task of keeping packages current. The Devuan project itself appears to illustrate the difficulty, since it still uses Debian 9 as its basis and so far has been unable to add multiple init support itself. When finding maintainers is a constant problem for many distros, perhaps a limit on the number of supported init systems is sheer practicality.

  • PulseAudio 14 Is Releasing Soon With Better USB Gaming Headset Support

    In addition to PipeWire 0.3 having shipped last week, also making it out a few days prior was a development snapshot in the road to PulseAudio 14.0.

    PulseAudio 13.99.1 was released as a development snapshot in the road to the imminent PulseAudio 14.0.

    In the 6+ months since PulseAudio 13, developers have been working on various audio sink changes, automatic switching to HDMI audio is now disabled by default, flat volumes are also disabled by default, there is better support for USB gaming headsets, PulseAudio honoring Xauthority arguments for X11 modules, a workaround for GNOME Sound Settings behavior, and various other changes.

  • Enterprise open source software is growing within innovative companies

    Red Hat has been at the forefront of the global open source discussion, fighting for software freedom in the U.S Supreme Court, and offering free tech products for cloud infrastructure, automation, AI, and much more. After conducting research and interviewing IT leaders from around the world, Red Hat released a report examining the state of enterprise open source in 2020.

    950 IT leaders, unaware that Red Hat was the research sponsor, were surveyed about their practices and opinions on enterprise open source software.

    [...]

    The benefits of using open source software seem obvious, namely that they are, of course, freely available. However, its lack of a price tag isn’t the main thing that IT leaders love.

    According to the survey, respondents believe that higher-quality software is the number one benefit of enterprise open source. FOSS software is often better than proprietary options, with better security, cloud-native technologies, and cutting edge solutions.

  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16 Delivers Long-Term Support

    On Feb. 20, Red Hat announced OpenStack Platform 16, a major update providing up to five years of support. The update is the first of 2020 and marks the beginning of a new approach to OpenStack support from Red Hat. Up until the OpenStack 15 release in September 2019, Red Hat released two minor updates every year that had up to one year of support, followed by a major long-term support release. As of the Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16 release, there will now only be long-term support releases.

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100,000 Tweets

@tuxmachines in Twitter
The @tuxmachines account in Twitter as of this morning

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