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Thursday, 24 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Typesort icon Title Author Replies Last Post
Blog entry Mandriva Linux 2011TP (Tech Preview) - Quick Look gfranken 08/02/2011 - 6:46pm
Blog entry gave it up srlinuxx 1 06/02/2011 - 12:14pm
Blog entry Best Hard Drives? srlinuxx 10 13/04/2011 - 6:00pm
Blog entry Damn you Kubuntu srlinuxx 1 25/01/2011 - 6:40pm
Blog entry Pandora FMS 3.2 has been released. geniususer 05/01/2011 - 5:54pm
Blog entry Printer Woes gfranken 5 19/01/2011 - 2:19am
Blog entry Happy Holidays srlinuxx 1 30/12/2010 - 5:33pm
Blog entry Enlightenment packages updated post beta 3 Texstar 27/12/2010 - 2:10am
Blog entry Downtime srlinuxx 1 21/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am

Mozilla: Shivam Singhal, Phabricator and Servo

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Friend of Add-ons: Shivam Singhal

    Please meet our newest Friend of Add-ons, Shivam Singhal! Shivam became involved with the add-ons community in April 2017. Currently, he is an extension developer, Mozilla Rep, and code contributor to addons.mozilla.org (AMO). He also helps mentor good-first-bugs on AMO.

    “My skill set grew while contributing to Mozilla,” Shivam says of his experiences over the last two years. “Being the part of a big community, I have learned how to work remotely with a cross-cultural team and how to mentor newbies. I have met some super awesome people like [AMO engineers] William Durand and Rebecca Mullin. The AMO team is super helpful to newcomers and works actively to help them.”

  • Code Coverage on Phabricator
  • This Week In Servo 124

The 10 Best Linux Games You Can Play for Free

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Are you just setting off on your Linux gaming adventure? Then you need to know about the best Linux games you can play for free. So many great Windows games are available on Linux, and there’s even a few unmissable titles that are only available on Linux.

So, if you’re looking for the best Linux games to play for free, here are 10 titles to get you started…

Read more

GNU/Linux on Chromebooks: the Latest

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
  • GPU Acceleration Enabled For Linux Apps on Pixelbook and Handful of Other Chromebooks

    According to a recent report over at About Chromebooks, Google’s Pixelbook and devices based on the ‘Nami’ baseboard are getting a very early taste of GPU acceleration for Linux Apps.

    We’ve talked about all this a bit more in-depth in the past, but here’s the reason this is important: GPU acceleration allows applications to fully leverage the GPU (graphics processing unit) present in all Chromebooks to better run graphic-intensive tasks like image editing, video editing, and gaming.

  • Testing the Linux virtual machine on Chrome OS

    As part of my ongoing quest to assess the feasibility of alternative (i.e. non-Windows or –macOS-based) computing platforms, regular readers may remember that I've so far published two posts on my experiences using a Chrome OS-based Google Pixelbook (its predecessor, a Toshiba Chromebook 2 2014 edition, still doesn't have long-promised Android support, by the way ... and if you'd like to follow in my footsteps, Pixelbook refurbs are on sale at Best Buy). In my most recent writeup, I discussed how the ability to run Android apps on top of Chrome OS significantly enhanced its viability as a mainstream operating system alternative. However, I also commented "these are [Android] apps originally intended for use on comparatively resource-poor smartphones and tablets." While they may have "light memory and CPU horsepower demands (versus, say, a full-blown macOS or Windows app equivalent)," this means that they also tend to be feature-deficient compared to a full-blown macOS or Windows app equivalent.

  • Snapdragon Chromebook ‘Cheza’ Ushers In Updated Linux Kernel

    Currently, the most recent version of the Linux kernel that can be found in a Chromebook is 4.4 and that only includes a relatively small percentage of all the Chrome devices on the market.

    With the exception of older Baytrail devices, kernel version 4.4 is found exclusively in Kaby Lake, Apollo Lake and OP1(RockChip RK3399) machines. These Linux kernels are at the core of what makes an operating system a functioning thing. The central nervous system, if you will.

Programming: VIM, Python, Knative, Glibc and GCC

Filed under
Advertisement

Games: DYSMANTLE is Getting GNU/Linux Support on Day One, Paladins on Steam Play and Wine 4.0 a Day or Two Away

Filed under
Gaming
  • DYSMANTLE is Getting Linux Support On Day One

    10tons has made some of the best and most engrossing twin-stick games on the market over the past five years. Tesla vs. Lovecraft offered up a scientific twist on the genre, while Time Recoil blended Hotline Miami-esque action-puzzle gameplay with a spy thriller. They rose to fame with Crimsonland, which was a mix of a twin-stick shooter and an original DOOM-esque setting with tons of bloodshed. Now, they're back with a mix of twin-stick shooter and survival - something that really hasn't been done yet. There's a heavy crafting element alongside a healthy dose of monster killing.

  • Paladins, the team-based shooter seems to work well with Steam Play

    For those curious about Steam Play and wanting to test it out a little, the free to play fantasy team-based shooter Paladins seems to work rather nicely.

    You might be wondering why this is so interesting? Well, the more we can get working on Linux the easier it will be for people to switch. For some, this might be that one killer game they can't be without. It's constantly in the top 30 most played games on Steam and it can now be played on Linux without much effort at all.

  • Wine-Staging 4.0-RC7 Brings Some Application Crash Fixes

    The big Wine 4.0 release will be out in just a few days while Wine-Staging 4.0 is following close behind for those wanting a bit more exciting and bleeding-edge experience.

Change of Fedora Strategy (IBM) and Microsoft EEE of Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Microsoft

Fedora Toolbox — Under the hood

Filed under
Red Hat

A few months ago, we had a glimpse at Fedora Toolbox setting up a seamlessly integrated RPM based environment, complete with dnf, on Fedora Silverblue. But isn’t dnf considered a persona non grata on Silverblue? How is this any different from using the existing Fedora Workstation then? What’s going on here?

Today we shall look under the covers to answer some of these questions.

Read more

OPNsense 19.1-RC1 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

For almost four years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We thank all of you for helping test, shape and contribute to the project! We know it would not be the same without you.

Download links, an installation guide[1] and the checksums for the images can be found below as well.

Read more

Also: OPNsense 19.1-RC1 Released With Many Improvements To This BSD Firewall Platform

Security: Updates, SDNs, Oklahoma’s Department of Securities (ODS)

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Break free from traditional network security

    From a security stance, the network is becoming perimeterless, and rather than a hard network barrier, the corporate network needs to be porous; security inside the network has to be zero-trust.

    The experts Computer Weekly contacted regarding perimeterless network security generally agree that such an architecture is not easy to achieve, but software-defined networking (SDN) and containerisation offer network security architects a sound foundation on which to implement a perimeterless network security strategy.

  • State agency exposes 3TB of data, including FBI info and remote logins

    Oklahoma’s Department of Securities (ODS) exposed three terabytes of files in plain text on the public internet this month, which contained sensitive data including social security numbers, details of FBI investigations, credentials for remote access to computers, and the names of AIDS patients.

    Researchers at security company UpGuard found the files using the Shodan search engine, which indexes internet-connected devices. In this case, they ran across an unsecured rsync server registered to ODS.

    Rsync is a utility commonly found on Unix and Linux systems that enables administrators to synchronize files between different computers. It is used for ‘delta’ syncing, in which one computer copies to another only the parts of files that have changed, enabling them to maintain identical copies of the files in different locations.

Server: QUIC, Supercomputers, CloudLinux Dashboard and Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Filed under
Server
  • Daniel Stenberg: QUIC and missing APIs

    I trust you’ve heard by now that HTTP/3 is coming. It is the next destined HTTP version, targeted to get published as an RFC in July 2019. Not very far off.

    HTTP/3 will not be done over TCP. It will only be performed over QUIC, which is a transport protocol replacement for TCP that always is done encrypted. There’s no clear-text version of QUIC.

  • Huge Supercomputers Still Exist. Here’s What They’re Being Used for Today

    The term “Supercomputer” implies one gigantic computer many times more powerful than your simple laptop, but that couldn’t be farther from the case. Supercomputers are made up of thousands of smaller computers, all hooked up together to perform one task. Each CPU core in a datacenter probably runs slower than your desktop computer. It’s the combination of all of them that makes computing so efficient. There’s a lot of networking and special hardware involved in computers of this scale, and it isn’t as simple as just plugging each rack into the network, but you can envision them this way, and you wouldn’t be far off the mark.

    Not every task can be parallelized so easily, so you won’t be using a supercomputer to run your games at a million frames per second. Parallel computing is usually good at speeding up very calculation-oriented computing.

    Supercomputers are measured in FLOPS, or Floating Point Operations Per Second, which is essentially a measure of how quickly it can do math. The fastest one currently is IBM’s Summit, which can reach over 200 PetaFLOPS, a million times faster than “Giga” most people are used to.

  • CloudLinux Dashboard — Now in Production

    The CloudLinux OS Team is excited to announce the CloudLinux Dashboard Production release for our valued server and hosting panel administrators. We believe that this product will firmly integrate into your workflow and greatly improve your performance when managing servers.

  • Google dominates code contributions across Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects

    Even without counting Kubernetes, Google is far and away the largest code contributor to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) open source group.

    Google accounts for 53% of all code commits to the Linux Foundation's CNCF and has seven times more contributions than Red Hat, which only accounted for 7.4% of the contributed code.

    The analysis of code contributions was done by Stackalytics, which is an open source code analysis framework that is hosted by the OpenStack Foundation and sponsored by Mirantis.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

Filed under
SUSE
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update

    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product.
    SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles.
    To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.

  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz

    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Gidday ArchLabbers,
Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh.
All changes are listed at the change-log.
If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket.

Read more

Programming: Homebrew 1.9, JBoss EAP, Python, Qt and Inclusion

Filed under
Development
  • Homebrew 1.9 Adds Linux Support, Auto-Cleanup, and More

    The latest release of popular macOS package manager Homebrew includes support for Linux, optional automatic package cleanup, and extended binary package support.

    Linux support, merged from the Linuxbrew project, is still in beta and will become stable in version 2.0. It also enables the use of Homebrew on Windows 10 systems with the Windows Subsystem for Linux installed.

    Auto-cleanup is meant to optimize disk space occupation by removing all intermediate data that Homebrew generates when installing packages. This can be a significant amount when Homebrew actually builds the packages from sources instead of just installing binaries. Auto-cleanup is opt-in by setting the HOMEBREW_INSTALL_CLEANUP. This behaviour will become opt-out in version 2.0, where you will be able to set the HOMEBREW_NO_INSTALL_CLEANUP environment variable to disable auto-cleanup.

  • Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1
  • Counteracting Code Complexity With Wily - Episode 195

    As we build software projects, complexity and technical debt are bound to creep into our code. To counteract these tendencies it is necessary to calculate and track metrics that highlight areas of improvement so that they can be acted on. To aid in identifying areas of your application that are breeding grounds for incidental complexity Anthony Shaw created Wily. In this episode he explains how Wily traverses the history of your repository and computes code complexity metrics over time and how you can use that information to guide your refactoring efforts.

  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.3.1 Released

    The Qt VS Tools version 2.3.1 has now been released to the Visual Studio Marketplace.

  • Ben Cotton: Inclusion is a necessary part of good coding

    Too often I see comments like “some people would rather focus on inclusion than write good code.” Not only is that a false dichotomy, but it completely misrepresents the relationship between the two. Inclusion doesn’t come at the cost of good code, it’s a necessary part of good code.

    We don’t write code for the sake of writing code. We write code for people to use it in some way. This means that the code needs to work for the people. In order to do that, the people designing and implementing the technology need to consider different experiences. The best way to do that is to have people with different experiences be on the team. As my 7th grade algebra teacher was fond of reminding us: garbage in, garbage out.

Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
BSD
  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux

    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time.

    Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.

  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support

    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.

  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve

    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey.

    In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.

Mesa 18.2 vs. 18.3 vs. 19.0 January Benchmarks For RadeonSI/RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With Mesa 19.0 entering its feature freeze before the month is through, here are fresh benchmarks of the very latest RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan performance on Polaris and Vega graphics cards compared to the current stable Mesa 18.3 series and the former 18.2 release. This testing is complementary to last week's Mesa 19.0 RADV vs. AMDVLK vs. AMDGPU-PRO Vulkan tests.

For the purposes of seeing how the latest Mesa 19.0 is stacking up on the Radeon side, tests were done with a Radeon RX 580 Polaris and Radeon RX Vega 56. Tests were done using Mesa 19.0-devel from the Padoka PPA built against LLVM 8.0 SVN AMDGPU and then against Mesa 18.3.1 stable with LLVM 7.0.0 (from the Pkppa) and then Mesa 18.2.2 built against LLVM 7.0 as is shipped by default currently on Ubuntu 18.10. So not only are we looking to see the current performance benefits of Mesa 19 but also whether the performance upgrade is worthwhile for those otherwise using the stock Mesa shipped by the current Ubuntu release.

Read more

12 Best Free Linux Project Management Software (Updated 2019)

Filed under
Development
Software

Project management tools encompass many different types of software such as scheduling, resource allocation, collaboration software, quality management, and cost control / budget management. This type of software is typically used by project managers looking to plan and control resources, costs and schedules to meet the objectives of a project.

To help plan a project, there are a number of different types of project management tools. One of the industry standards is the Gantt Chart, which provides a graphical displays of all the tasks that a project is composed of. Each bar on the chart is a graphical representation of the length of time the task is planned to take. Other popular tools include PERT charts (a method for analyzing the tasks involved in completing a project), Product Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of components that make up a project deliverable), and Work Breakdown Structure (a hierarchical tree structure of deliverables and tasks that need to be performed to complete a project).

Project management tools offer many advantages when it comes to project planning and tracking. Gantt charts are synonymous with project management. The ability to get an overview of a project visually in the form of a simple to understand chart should not be underestimated. But good project management software offers so much more functionality.

Read more

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Software: DICOM Viewers, gotop and Cockpit

  • Top 11 Free Linux DICOM Viewers for Doctors
    DICOM stands for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine and it is the international open image format for handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical images. Medical images are used in the identification and examination of physical injuries and diseases via procedures like Xrays, CT scans, etc. This article lists the best free Linux applications used for processing images generated by DICOM devices.
  • gotop: Graphical System Monitor For The Command Line
    gotop is a terminal-based (TUI) system monitor for Linux and macOS. The software is inspired by gtop and vtop, but while these 2 utilities use Node.js, gotop is written in Go. The command line tool supports mouse clicking and scrolling, comes with vi-keys, and it displays the CPU, memory and network usage history using colored graphs, while also displaying their current values. gotop also shows the disk usage, temperatures and a top process list, which includes CPU and memory usage.
  • Cockpit 186
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 186.

Netrunner's Unique Blackbird Soars to New Heights

Blackbird, Netrunner's version 19.01 release, hit the download servers on Jan. 14, and this distro deserves to be considered bleeding-edge. Netrunner is a step ahead of other KDE distros, thanks to its solid integration of classic KDE desktop performance with Web-based applications and cloud services. That said, if you aren't fondness of the K Desktop, Netrunner may leave you wanting more desktop simplicity. For that you must look elsewhere. KDE is the only desktop available from the Germany-based Blue Systems development team. Blackbird is based on Debian's "Testing" branch. Its developer brings some aggressive updates to the distro that propel it ahead of other distros' regular development cycles. The main updates include KDE Plasma 5.14.3, KDE Frameworks 5.51, KDE Applications 18.08 and Qt 5.11.3 for its essential security updates. Linux Kernel 4.19, Firefox Quantum 64.0 and Thunderbird 60.3 push the envelope as well. One of the more noticeable new features in Blackbird is its new Netrunner Black theme. This theme is based on a dark-toned contrasting visual. It uses the Kvantum theme engine, plus the Alpha-Black Plasma theme, to produce a more 3D-looking design. Read more

Mozilla Masking 'Content', ffsend and New Accountant or Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Brussels Mozilla Mornings – Disinformation and online advertising: an unhealthy relationship?
    On the morning of 19 February, Mozilla will host the second of our Mozilla Mornings series – regular breakfast meetings where we bring together policy experts, policymakers and practitioners for insight and discussion on the latest EU digital policy developments. This session will be devoted to disinformation and online advertising. Our expert panel will seek to unpack the relation between the two and explore policy solutions to ensure a healthy online advertising ecosystem.
  • ffsend – Easily And Securely Share Files From Linux Command Line Using Firefox Send Client
    Linux users were preferred to go with scp or rsync for files or folders copy. However, so many new options are coming to Linux because it’s a opensource. Anyone can develop a secure software for Linux. We had written multiple articles in our site in the past about this topic. Even, today we are going to discuss the same kind of topic called ffsend.
  • Welcome Roxi Wen, our incoming Chief Financial Officer
    I am excited to announce that Roxi Wen is joining Mozilla Corporation as our Chief Financial Officer (CFO) next month. As a wholly-owned subsidiary of the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, the Mozilla Corporation, with over 1,000 full-time employees worldwide, creates products, advances public policy and explores new technology that give people more control over their lives online, and shapes the future of the global internet platform for the public good. As our CFO Roxi will become a key member of our senior executive team with responsibility for leading financial operations and strategy as we scale our mission impact with new and existing products, technology and business models to better serve our users and advance our agenda for a healthier internet.

Security: apt/apt-get, Blockchains and More