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Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Based on Enterprise Code, Tested Millions of Times: openSUSE Leap 15 released

Filed under
SUSE

Today’s major release of openSUSE Leap 15 is offering professional users, entrepreneurs and ISVs (Independent Software Vendors) a new, fresh and hardened code base for their workloads that supports modern hardware, based on a stable, community- and enterprise-based open-source GNU/Linux distribution – but developed with a modern, more secure, better tested and much more open open-source build system unique to SUSE and openSUSE.

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Also: openSUSE Leap 15 Officially Released, Based on SUSE Enterprise Linux 15

OpenSUSE Leap 15 Released, Based On SUSE Linux Enterprise 15

OpenSUSE Conference 2018 Kicks Off In Prague, Video Streams Available

Games: Turok, Steam, Cities: Skylines - Parklife and Lots More

Filed under
Gaming

GNOME 3.30 Desktop Environment Receives Support for ARM64 Hardware Architectures

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.29.2 has been released today as the second of four development snapshots towards the GNOME 3.30 desktop environment, due for release this fall. It comes five weeks after the first snapshot, GNOME 3.29.1, with even more improvements and new features across various components.

One of the most exciting new features that landed during this development cycle is support for building the GNOME desktop environment for ARM64 (AArch64) architectures, which would allow it to run on various ARM hardware, including the upcoming Librem 5 Linux smartphone from Purism.

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Also: GNOME 3.29.2 Released As The Second Step Towards GNOME 3.30

Looks Like GNOME's Nautilus File Manager Will Allow Running of Binaries, Scripts

More Dell Laptops With GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Welcome the new Dell Precision developer editions!

    Today I’m proud to announce the new the Linux-based Dell Precision Mobile workstation line: the 3530, 5530, 7530 and the 7730. These systems, which represent the fourth generation of the Precision developer editions, come preloaded with Ubuntu and have been RHEL certified.

    These new thinner, lighter, premium-built Precision mobile workstations feature the latest Intel Core and Xeon processors, blazing-fast memory and professional graphics.

  • Dell Launches New Precision Mobile Workstation Line-Up Powered by Ubuntu Linux

    Dell has launched a new Dell Precision Mobile Workstation line-up powered by the Ubuntu Linux operating system, featuting thinner and lighter designs with premium builds and using the latest technologies.

    Targeted mostly at developers, the new Dell Precision Mobile Workstation "Developer Edition" line-up consists of the Dell Precision 3530 Mobile Workstation, Dell Precision 5530 Mobile Workstation, Dell Precision 7530 Mobile Workstation, and Dell Precision 7730 Mobile Workstation, which come with a much lighter and thinner design, and offer a premium build.

  • Dell Unveils New Ubuntu Laptops

    Thinner, lighter and more powerful — three ways to describe the latest Ubuntu powered laptops from Dell.

    Everyone’s favourite Linux laptop vendor has lifted the veil on a fresh set of Linux-powered laptops.

    Their all-new Dell Precision Mobile Workstation ‘developer editions’ combine the latest Intel Core and Xeon processors, memory options and discrete graphics with the steady and stable Ubuntu operating system.

Elive Brings Enlightenment to the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

For the longest time, Enlightenment was my Linux desktop of choice. It was incredibly fast, highly configurable, and gorgeous. Since that time, I’ve migrated to desktops that veer toward being simpler, more efficient to work with… but I always consider my years with E16 and E17 with great fondness. Fortunately, at least two outstanding distributions focus on either Enlightenment E17 or a fork of E17. Bodhi Linux is a darling distribution (that I looked at previously) that uses a fork of E17, called Moksha Desktop. The developers of Bodhi have done some remarkable work with Enlightenment, but this article isn’t about Bodhi. Instead, I want to focus on a distribution that uses straight up Enlightenment E17. That distribution of Linux is Elive.

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How to Set Different Wallpaper for Each Monitor in Linux

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HowTos

If you want to display different wallpapers on multiple monitors on Ubuntu 18.04 or any other Linux distribution with GNOME, MATE or Budgie desktop environment, this nifty tool will help you achieve this.
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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat certifies multiple Ribbon VNFs on Open Stack platform 10

    Ribbon Communications Inc., a global provider of secure and intelligent cloud communications, announced that its Session Border Controller Software Edition (SBC SWe), Insight Element Management System (EMS) and Centralised Policy and Routing Software Edition (PSX SWe) are certified on Red Hat® OpenStack® Platform 10.

    Ribbon’s relationship with Red Hat Inc., a provider of open source solutions that bring Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV) to the market, includes membership in the Red Hat Connect for Technology Partners and Red Hat Connect for Business Partners programs.

  • Red Hat Hyperconverged Infrastructure for Cloud launches

    Red Hat expanded its hyper-converged infrastructure product line to target cloud environments by combining its supported OpenStack Platform and Ceph storage software distributions.

  • Red Hat powers Tata Comm’s IZO Private Cloud

    To offer its enterprise customers a reliable hybrid cloud experience across the globe, Tata Communications has selected Red Hat Cloud Suite to enhance its IZO Private Cloud service.

    Today, enterprises are adopting private and hybrid cloud strategies to help address the complexity and competitive pressures created by the evolution of new technologies. Tata Communications’ IZO Private Cloud is an integrated cloud platform that allows enterprises to build a hybrid cloud environment with the flexibility to burst to public cloud with enterprise-grade control and security. It is part of Tata Communications’ IZO cloud enablement platform that is underpinned by the company’s global network and partnerships with the world’s biggest cloud companies.

  • Open sass: Ubuntu/Red Hat drama erupts at Openstack

    Canonical founder and part-time hobby astronaut Mark Shuttleworth began his Openstack keynote this week by criticising Red Hat for being too expensive.

    Among the nervous laughter someone at the front yelled "fact check!" - but speaking with Computerworld UK, Shuttleworth insists no one has refuted his numbers.

    "Good luck to it," he commented when asked about the fact-check-heckler. "Everything I put out there is supported by customers. There have been a number of analyst surveys of cloud economics that put Canonical on top of the list in terms of doing it efficiently.

  • Red Hat’s David Egts, Unisys’ Peter O’Donoghue Outline DevOps Challenges in Public Sector

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat‘s public sector business, has said public sector organizations may encounter challenges in adopting DevOps in their information technology systems due to a culture that focuses on long-term initiatives.

15 books for kids who (you want to) love Linux and open source

Filed under
OSS

In my job I've heard professionals in tech, from C-level executives to everyone in between, say they want their own kids to learn more about Linux and open source. Some of them seem to have an easy time with their kids following closely in their footsteps. And some have a tough time getting their kids to see what makes Linux and open source so cool. Maybe their time will come, maybe it won't. There's a lot of interesting, valuable stuff out there in this big world.

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Security: VPNFilter, Encryption in GNU/Linux, Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

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Security
  • [Crackers] infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

    VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

  • Do Not Use sha256crypt / sha512crypt - They're Dangerous

    I'd like to demonstrate why I think using sha256crypt or sha512crypt on current GNU/Linux operating systems is dangerous, and why I think the developers of GLIBC should move to scrypt or Argon2, or at least bcrypt or PBKDF2.

  • Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

    I investigated an rr bug report and discovered an annoying Intel CPU bug that affects rr replay using data watchpoints. It doesn't seem to be hit very often in practice, which is good because I don't know any way to work around it. It turns out that the bug is probably covered by an existing Intel erratum for Skylake and Kaby Lake (and probably later generations, but I'm not sure), which I even blogged about previously! However, the erratum does not mention watchpoints and the bug I've found definitely depends on data watchpoints being set.

    I was able to write a stand-alone testcase to characterize the bug. The issue seems to be that if a rep stos (and probably rep movs) instruction writes between 1 and 64 bytes (inclusive), and you have a read or write watchpoint in the range [64, 128) bytes from the start of the writes (i.e., not triggered by the instruction), then one spurious retired conditional branch is (usually) counted. The alignment of the writes does not matter, and it's not related to speculative execution.

In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion

Filed under
Just talk

Videographer Robin Roblimo Miller

Robin "Roblimo" Miller was a clever, friendly, and very amicable individual who everyone I know has plenty of positive things to say about. I had the pleasure of speaking to him for several hours about anything from personal life and professional views. Miller was a very knowledgeable person whose trade as a journalist and video producer I often envied. I have seen him facing his critics in his capacity as a journalist over a decade ago when he arranged a debate about OOXML (on live radio). Miller, to me, will always be remembered as a strong-minded and investigative journalist who "did the right thing" as the cliché goes, irrespective of financial gain -- something which can sometimes be detrimental to one's longterm health. Miller sacrificed many of his later years to a cause worth fighting for. This is what we ought to remember him for. Miller was - and always will be - a FOSS hero.

May everything you fought for be fulfilled, Mr. Miller. I already miss you.

Tux Machines Privacy Statement

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Site News

Summary: Today, May 25th, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into full effect; we hereby make a statement on privacy

AS a matter of strict principle, this site never has and never will accumulate data on visitors (e.g. access logs) for longer than 28 days. The servers are configured to permanently delete all access data after this period of time. No 'offline' copies are being made. Temporary logging is only required in case of DDOS attacks and cracking attempts -- the sole purpose of such access. Additionally, we never have and never will sell any data pertaining to anything. We never received demands for such data from authorities; even if we had, we would openly declare this (publicly, a la Canary) and decline to comply. Privacy is extremely important to us, which is why pages contain little or no cross-site channels (such as Google Analytics, 'interactive' buttons for 'social' media etc.) and won't be adding any. Google may be able to 'see' what pages people visit because of Google Translate (top left of every page), but that is not much worse than one's ISP 'seeing' the same thing. We are aware of this caveat.

Shall readers have any further questions on such matters, do not hesitate to contact us.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • S11E12 – Twelve Years a Slave

    It’s Season 11 Episode 12 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Porting guide from Qt 1.0 to 5.11

    We do try to keep breakages to a minimum, even in the major releases, but the changes do add up. This raises the question: How hard would it be to port a Qt application from Qt 1.0 to 5.11?

  • Thunderbolt Networking on Linux

    Thunderbolt allows for peer-to-peer network connections by connecting two computers directly via a thunderbolt cable. Mika from Intel added support for this to the 4.15 kernel. Recently, Thomas Haller from NetworkManager and I worked together to figure out what needs to be done in userspace to make it work. As it turns out, it was not that hard and the pull-request was merged swiftly.

  • What’s new in openSUSE Leap 15 – part 1

    openSUSE Leap 15 will be released on the 25th of May 2018! A new openSUSE release is always an exciting event. This means that I get to play with all kinds of new and improved software packages.

    I am aware that I can simply install openSUSE Tumbleweed and have a new release 4 or 5 times a week. But when using openSUSE Tumbleweed some time ago, I noticed that I was installing Gigabytes of new software packages multiple times per week. The reason for that is that I have the complete opposite of a minimum install. I always install a lot of applications to play / experiment with (including a lot of open source games). I am using openSUSE since 2009 and it covers all of my needs and then some. I am already happy with the available software, so there is no real reason for me to move with the speed of a rolling release. Therefore I prefer to move with the slower pace of the Leap releases.

  • GNOME Terminal: a little something for Fedora 29

    Can you spot what that is?

  • UBports To Work On Unity 8 / Mir / Wayland After OTA-4

    The UBports team have put out their latest batch of answers to common questions around this project that's still working to maintain the Ubuntu Touch software stack.

    Among the project's recent work has included getting QtWebEngine working on Mir and before their Ubuntu 16.04 LTS based release they still need to figure out Chromium crashes and to resolve that as well as updating the browser. For their first release of UBports derived from Ubuntu 16.04 "Xenial" they are still going to rely upon Oxide while later on should migrate to a new browser.

  • 8 Best App Locks For Android To Secure Your Device In 2018
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 39
  • What's Coming in OpenStack Rocky?

    The OpenStack Rocky release is currently scheduled to become generally available on August 30th, and it's expected to add a host of new and enhanced capabilities to the open-source cloud platform.

    At the OpenStack Summit here, Anne Bertucio, marketing manager at the OpenStack Foundation, and Pete Chadwick, director of product management at SUSE, outlined some of the features currently on the Rocky roadmap.

    Bertucio began the session by warning the audience that the roadmap is not prescriptive, but rather is intended to provide a general idea of the direction the next OpenStack release is taking.

  • PostgreSQL 11 Is Continuing With More Performance Improvements, JIT'ing

    PostgreSQL 11 is the next major feature release of this open-source database SQL server due out later in 2018. While it's not out yet, their release notes were recently updated for providing an overview of what's coming as part of this next major update.

    To little surprise, performance improvements remain a big focus for PostgreSQL 11 with various optimizations as well as continued parallelization work and also the recently introduced just-in-time (JIT) compilation support.

  • Tidelift Secures $15M in Series A Funding

    Tidelift, a Boston, MA-based open source software startup, secured $15m in Series A funding.

  • Tesla disclosed some of its autopilot source code after GPL violation

    Tesla, a technology company, and the independent automaker are well known for offering the safest, quickest electric cars. The company uses a lot of open source software to build its operating system and features, such as Linux Kernel, Buildroot, Busybox, QT, etc also they have always been taciturn about the finer details and tech of its popular artefacts, such as Model S, Model X, but now Elon Musk’s company has just released some of its automotive tech source code into the open source community.

  • Open Source Underwater Distributed Sensor Network

    One way to design an underwater monitoring device is to take inspiration from nature and emulate an underwater creature. [Michael Barton-Sweeney] is making devices in the shape of, and functioning somewhat like, clams for his open source underwater distributed sensor network.

  • Security Researchers Discover Two New Variants of the Spectre Vulnerability
  • Security updates for Thursday

Games and Wine: Hacknet - Deluxe, Full Metal Furies and More

Filed under
Gaming

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling

    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.

  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL

    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too.

    Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.

  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context

    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.

  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab

    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool.

The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot).

In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice.

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How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

Filed under
Linux
OSS

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.”

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.17-rc7

So this week wasn't as calm as the previous weeks have been, but despite that I suspect this is the last rc. This week we had the whole "spectre v4" thing, and yes, the fallout from that shows up as part of the patch and commit log. But it's not actually dominant: the patch is pretty evenly one third arch updates, one third networking updates, and one third "rest". The arch updates are largely - although not exclusively - spectre v4. The networking stuff is mostly network drivers, but there's some core networking too. And "the rest" is just that - misc drivers (rdma, gpu, other), documentation, some vfs, vm, bpf, tooling.. The bulk of it is really pretty trivial one-liners, and nothing looks particularly scary. Let's see how next week looks, but if nothing really happens I suspect we can make do without an rc8. Shortlog appended as usual. Go out and test. Read more

Today in Techrights

Libre Hardware

  • Flash your Libre Firmware with a Libre Programmer
    Whether or not you personally agree with all the ideals of the Free Software Foundation (FSF), you’ve got to give them credit: they don’t mess around. They started by laying the groundwork for a free and open source operating system, then once that dream was realized, started pushing the idea of replacing proprietary BIOS firmware with an open alternative such as Libreboot. But apparently, even that’s not enough, as there’s still more freedom to be had. We’re playing 4D Libre Chess now, folks. [...] Luckily, the FSF has just awarded the Zerocat Chipflasher their “Respects Your Freedom” certification, meaning every element of the product is released under a free license for your hacking enjoyment.
  • Coreboot Picks Up Support For Another Eight Year Old Intel Motherboard
    If by chance you happen to have an Intel DG41WV motherboard, it's now supported by mainline Coreboot so you can free the system down to the BIOS. The DG41WV motherboard comes from the LGA-775 days with an Intel G41 Eaglelake chipset back when DDR3-1066 was great, motherboards topped out with 4GB of RAM, four USB 2.0 ports were suitable, and motherboard PCBs were much less fashionable. The DG41WV was a micro-ATX board and a decent choice for the times to pair with a CPU like the Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad.

Events: KubeCon, openSUSE Conference 2018 and Hacker Summer Camp 2018

  • Diversity, education, privilege and ethics in technology
    And that is the ultimate fraud: to make the world believe we are harmless little boys, so repressed that we can't communicate properly. We're so sorry we're awkward, it's because we're all somewhat on the autism spectrum. Isn't that, after all, a convenient affliction for people that would not dare to confront the oppression they are creating? It's too easy to hide behind such a real and serious condition that does affect people in our community, but also truly autistic people that simply cannot make it in the fast-moving world the magical rain man is creating. But the real con is hacking power and political control away from traditional institutions, seen as too slow-moving to really accomplish the "change" that is "needed". We are creating an inextricable technocracy that no one will understand, not even us "experts". Instead of serving the people, the machine is at the mercy of markets and powerful oligarchs. A recurring pattern at Kubernetes conferences is the KubeCon chant where Kelsey Hightower reluctantly engages the crowd in a pep chant: When I say 'Kube!', you say 'Con!' 'Kube!' 'Con!' 'Kube!' 'Con!' 'Kube!' 'Con!' Cube Con indeed... I wish I had some wise parting thoughts of where to go from here or how to change this. The tide seems so strong that all I can do is observe and tell stories. My hope is that the people that need to hear this will take it the right way, but I somehow doubt it. With chance, it might just become irrelevant and everything will fix itself, but somehow I fear things will get worse before they get better.
  • openSUSE Conference 2018
    This year openSUSE conference was held in Prague and, thanks to both my employer and openSUSE conference organizers, I've been able to spend almost a full day there. I've headed to Prague with a Fleet Commander talk accepted and, as openSUSE Leap 15.0 was released Yesterday, also with the idea to show an unattended ("express") installation of the "as fresh as possible" Leap 15.0 happening on GNOME Boxes. The conference was not so big, which helped to easy spot some old friends (Fridrich Strba, seriously? Meeting you after almost 7 years ... I have no words to describe my happiness on seeing you there!), some known faces (as Scott, with whom I just meet at conferences :-)) and also meet some people who either helped me a lot in the past (here I can mention the whole autoyast team who gave me some big support when I was writing down the autoinst.xml for libosinfo, which provides the support to do openSUSE's express installations via GNOME Boxes) or who have some interest in some of the work I've been doing (as Richard Brown who's a well-know figure around SUSE/openSUSE community, a GNOME Boxes user and also an enthusiastic supporter of our work done in libosiinfo/osinfo-db).
  • Hacker Summer Camp 2018: Prep Guide
    For those unfamiliar with the term, Hacker Summer Camp is the combination of DEF CON, Black Hat USA, and BSides Las Vegas that takes place in the hot Las Vegas sun every summer, along with all the associated parties and side events. It’s the largest gathering of hackers, information security professionals and enthusiasts, and has been growing for 25 years. In this post, I’ll present my views on how to get the most out of your 2018 trip to the desert, along with tips & points from some of my friends.