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Saturday, 01 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ZTE Geek smartphone with Tizen Linux on the way? Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 12:16am
Story Air France builds private cloud with HP for Linux server farm Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 12:08am
Story US Army invests in Linux-powered, Wi-Fi capable 'smart rifles' Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 12:06am
Story LLVM Point Releases Look Like They Will Finally Happen Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2014 - 11:42pm
Story Wayland and Weston 1.3.93 (1.4 RC) Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2014 - 11:07pm
Story Linux Kernel's Sysfs Logic Turns Into "Kernfs" For 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2014 - 10:56pm
Story Jolla outsells iPhone 5c and iPhone 5s at Finnish carrier DNA Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2014 - 10:53pm
Story Google Now comes to your desktop Roy Schestowitz 20/01/2014 - 10:29pm
Story Top events ahead in 2014 for abusive patent litigation Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2014 - 10:14pm
Story SCHED_DEADLINE To Be Added To Linux 3.14 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 20/01/2014 - 10:04pm

What is So Great About Linux

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot.com: The simple commitment to share code is probably the single most powerful contributor to the growth of the open source software movement in general, and Linux in particular. The willingness of Linus to incorporate code from others in the Linux kernel has also been critical to the success of Linux. The following sections characterize Linux and the communities.

9 useful Linux commands everyone should use

Filed under
Linux

blogs.howtogeek.com: Just switched from Windows and still a bit scared about the command line? You shouldn't be! The command line is a very powerful, fast and intuitive tool to get things done without clicking buttons and navigating through windows.

Switching From Windows To Linux In 3 Easy Steps

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: In my ongoing quest to take over the world with Linux as my OS of choice, I've noticed that simply handing someone an install CD doesn't really do the trick. The problem is that hating Windows isn't enough. Most people hate Windows, but feel trapped into using it. That's where my 3 step approach comes in.

What Xandros Has Up Its Sleeve

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider.com: Custom Linux provider Xandros will release a free Linux OS called "Freespire 5" during the fourth quarter of 2008. This next version of Freespire will be based on the Debian GNU/Linux "Lenny" release rather than the Ubuntu Linux platform Freespire 4 uses.

Source for the goose should be source for the gander

Filed under
OSS

ft.com: Jamie Boyle’s sensible defence of open-source software starts in a disarming way, by suggesting that the Federal Circuit’s decision in Jacobsen v Katzer, which upheld the validity of an open-source copyright claim, was one of those dry-as-dust decisions that only intellectual property geeks could love.

Top 200 Tech Blogs: the Datamation List

Filed under
Web

earthweb.com: The universe of tech blogs is solar system-sized and getting bigger all the time. Part of what makes it so vast is an inescapable fact: people interested in technology spend inordinate time with computers, so naturally a Web-based medium is wildly popular. So the question becomes more difficult every year: Which of the gazillion tech blogs are worth your time?

40 reasons to lose Linux and vote Vista!

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Challenged by my iTWire colleague and Linux lover Sam Varghese to come up with 40 reasons to lose Linux and vote Vista, I’ve done just that.

Tint2 + Trayer

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: In my last screenshot-post I was still using LXpanel. It’s just that it looks a bit boring…even with transparency turned on. Enter: tint2.

Survey Says: Ubuntu Server Gaining Momentum

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Conventional wisdom says Ubuntu’s popularity is limited to desktop PCs and laptops. However, a reader survey by Works With U reveals that nearly 80 percent of organizations running Ubuntu depend on at least one production Ubuntu server. Here’s the scoop.

Five Useful Extensions for OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

linux-magazine.com: Want to expand OpenOffice.org's default functionality? The official extension repository has quite a few extensions you can use to add some nifty features to the productivity suite. Precisely which extensions you might find useful depends, of course, on your particular needs, but there are at least five extensions that deserve a closer look no matter how you use OpenOffice.org.

Google pledges 9 month anonymity on data

Filed under
Google

techradar.com: Google has responded to mounting EU pressure on privacy by stating it will 'anonymize' users' IP addresses after nine months.

When Will They Ever Learn?

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: Here's some news from Red Hat: We’ve partnered with Seneca College, one of the leaders in instituting open source software into its coursework, to bring Fedora to the classroom. What's remarkable about this is that Red Hat considers it remarkable. And, sadly, it *is* remarkable.

Ubuntu In Popular Culture

Filed under
Ubuntu

daniel.holba.ch/blog: Yesterday we watched “Berlin am Meer” - not a world-changing, but nice movie which plays in Berlin. I was pleased to see they used Ubuntu in a short scene.

Polishing Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: In an effort to increase the level of Firefox’s visual and interactive polish, I’ll be posting a list of around 7 bugs every monday from now until we finish up Firefox 3.1.

Don't be Afraid of Linux

Filed under
Linux

shoutwire.com: When it comes to dual-booting Linux and Windows, your average computer user will shit himself six ways from Sunday and refuse because he doesn't want to have to learn anything new. Most people are just too damn intimidated by all the geek rhetoric they hear online and honestly just don't want to screw up their machine.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu is really boring me on my desktop

  • Fully Automatic Installation for all distributions
  • More fun X-based stuff
  • Gambas - Almost Visual Basic for Linux
  • Lego-like Linux modules ready to ship
  • Interactive C# Shell
  • A Flurry of Open Source Video-Related News
  • The all new Ubuntu Brainstorm
  • openSUSE Build Service Build Checks
  • Microsoft, Novell Making Virtualization Moves At VMworld
  • No tiling support for KDE 4.2
  • Bill and Jerry, Chrome and the Next Linux Generation
  • Ad danger to open source
  • How pot may win the war against super-bacteria

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel Swear Words

  • Visualizing open source software
  • Linux Outlaws 53 - Duck Porn?!

Review: Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Review: Acer Aspire One

  • OLPC's Amazon Notebook Linux Only
  • ASUS Eee PC 901 falls to a cool $500
  • Bootleg videos to blame for Linux MSI Wind delay?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org: Knowing when to use Impress

  • Improve login time by using readahead in Ubuntu
  • Linux Wi-Fi Works With wicd
  • Use Amarok as An Alarm Clock
  • Configuring IceWM: Basics
  • Linux Performance Hunting Tips - Take Copious Notes (Save Everything)
  • Avoid OpenDNS Free DNS Service Like The Plague
  • Tip: USB key problem on Mandriva
  • DIY File Server
  • Finding Overlapping Matches Using Perl's Lookahead Assertion Matching
  • small Qt based mail biff
  • Expanding text with Snippits in Linux

Ubuntu debuts Jaunty Jackalope

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com.au: The Ubuntu project has detailed plans for the April 2009 version of its Linux distribution, continuing its habit of naming its software after animals by dubbing Ubuntu 9.04 "The Jaunty Jackalope".

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today's leftovers

  • Linux Unable To Boot Lenovo Yoga 900 & 900; Is Microsoft At Fault?
    The popular device developer Lenovo has verified the claims that Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s unable to boot Linux OS but only Microsoft Windows 10. The new Lenovo convertible laptop, Lenovo Yoga 900 and 900s, would reject and decline any attempt to install Linux operating system, making users turn their heads to Microsoft as the suspect for this issue. [...] This issue about the OS started when an identity of BaronHK posted on Reddit about installing Linux on the latest Lenovo Yoga book in which BaronHK encountered being blocked by a locked solid state drive (SSD) which Linux cannot define itself, and come up to link the issue to Microsoft.
  • How Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2 Performance Compares To Some Other Linux Distros
    The final Ubuntu 16.10 Beta for "Yakkety Yak" was released this week and we found its performance doesn't differ much from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (with the exception of the newer graphics stack) while here are some results comparing it to other modern Linux distributions. Tested for this quick, one-page-article comparison were Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, Ubuntu 16.10 Beta 2, Clear Linux 10660, Fedora 24, openSUSE Tumbleweed 20160927, and the Arch-based Antergos 16.9-Rolling release.
  • Qt 3D WIP branches
  • New Qt 3D Functionality Is Being Worked On
    Sean Harmer of KDAB is organizing work around some upcoming "major Qt 3D features" for the open-source toolkit. It's not known if the next round of Qt 3D features will be ready for the Qt 5.9 tool-kit release, but KDAB is looking to have these new branches for feature work with continuous integration coverage.
  • Cross-compiling WebKit2GTK+ for ARM
    Of course, I know for a fact that many people use local recipes to cross-compile WebKit2GTK+ for ARM (or simply build in the target machine, which usually takes a looong time), but those are usually ad-hoc things and hard to reproduce environments locally (or at least hard for me) and, even worse, often bound to downstream projects, so I thought it would be nice to try to have something tested with upstream WebKit2GTK+ and publish it on trac.webkit.org,
  • Should we drop Vala?
    Is it Vala development a waste of time? Is Vala suitable for long term support libraries?
  • SUSECON 2016: Where Technology Reigns Supreme [Ed: “Article Sponsor: SUSE”]
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/39
  • Free software activities in September 2016

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.6 Is Out with MIPS and OCFS2 Improvements, Updated Drivers
    Today, September 30, 2016, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the release of the sixth maintenance update to the latest stable Linux 4.7 kernel series. Linux kernel 4.7.6 comes only five days after the release of the previous maintenance version, Linux kernel 4.7.5, and, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from the last update, it changes a total of 76 files, with 539 insertions and 455 deletions. In summary, it updates multiple drivers, adds improvements to various filesystems and hardware architectures, and improves the networking stack.
  • Linux Kernel 4.4.23 LTS Has ARM and MIPS Improvements, Updated Filesystems, More
    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.6, Greg Kroah-Hartman proudly informed the community about the general availability of the Linux 4.4.23 LTS kernel. The Linux 4.4 kernel is a long-term supported branch, the latest and most advanced one, used in many stable and reliable GNU/Linux operating systems, including Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Alpine Linux 3.4. Therefore, it is imperative for it to receive regular updates that bring fixes to the most important issues, as well as other general improvements.
  • From NFS to LizardFS
    If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll know that we started our data servers out using NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit some load problems, switched to btrfs, hit load problems again, tried a hacky workaround, ran into problems, dropped DRBD for glusterfs, had a major disaster, switched back to NFS on ext4 mirrored over DRBD, hit more load problems, and finally dropped DRBD for ZFS.
  • IBM's Ginni Rometty Tells Bankers Not To Rest On Their Digital Laurels
  • BUS1, The Successor To KDBUS, Formally Unveiled -- Aiming For Mainline Linux Kernel
    BUS1 has been in development as an in-kernel IPC mechanism building off the failed KDBUS project. An "RFC" will soon be sent out to Linux kernel developers about BUS1 and the subject will be discussed at next month's Kernel Summit. David Herrmann, one of the BUS1 developers, presented at this week's systemd.conf conference about the new capability-based IPC for Linux. He talked about how BUS1 is superior to KDBUS, how BUS1 is similar to Android's Binder, Chrome's Mojo, Solaris' Doors, and other common IPC implementations.
  • A New Wireless Daemon Is In Development To Potentially Replace wpa_supplicant
    In addition to the BUS1 presentation, also exciting from the systemd.conf 2016 conference is a thorough walkthrough of a new wireless daemon for Linux being developed by Intel's Open-Source Technology Center. Intel has been developing a new wireless daemon for Linux to potentially replace wpa_supplicant. This new daemon isn't yet public but the code repositories for it will be opened up in the next few weeks. This new daemon has improvements around persistency, WiFi management, reduced abstractions for different operating systems and legacy interfaces, and changes to operation. This daemon is designed to be very lightweight and work well for embedded Linux use-cases especially, including IoT applications.