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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 3.14-rc4 Rianne Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 7:14am
Forum topic New distros Roy Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 5:52am
Forum topic Script Kiddies Roy Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 5:42am
Story PC-BSD 10.0 vs. PC-BSD 9.2 vs. Ubuntu 13.10 Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 1:19am
Story Linux Kernel 3.13 Finally Arrives on Arch Linux, with a Warning Rianne Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 9:05pm
Story QBEH-1: The Atlas Cube Atmospheric First Person Puzzle Game Releasing In April For Linux Rianne Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 8:59pm
Story Several Great Linux Terminal Games Rianne Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 8:49pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 8:47pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 8:46pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2014 - 8:45pm

Ease Linux Migration By Asking Hard Questions First

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Linux Over at TechRepublic, Jack Wallen details ten points to consider prior to moving your organization to Linux. Some points are far more critical for operation than others, but all require attention. Depending on the workplace and industry, it might be worth an administrator's time to consider a few other points as well.

Happy 10th Birthday Linux Today

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Web Ten years and going strong is quite an achievement. In that time LT has survived the dot-bomb and many changes. The archives have been maintained and are still available, which I think is pretty amazing-- you can go all the way back to the very first Linux Today story: Apache 1.3.2 is released.

10 Finger Licking Linux Desktop Themes

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Software Anyone can go to gnome-look and go through thousands of available theme, but we have decided to make a list of ten themes that we thought are a cut above the others.

VMware Workstation 6.5 consolidates the best of desktop virtualization

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Software Virtualization software can help you run programs that your native Linux distro wouldn't. While Linux users have many virtualization options, none comes close to the all-encompassing VMware Workstation 6.5. Introduced last month, VMware Workstation 6.5 continues the tradition of outshining and outpacing the competition.

Kernel developers, Wall Street to come together

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Linux (IDG): The Linux Foundation is holding its first End User Summit beginning Monday in New York, in an effort to bring Linux kernel developers in closer contact with users at Wall Street institutions and other major companies.

Benefits of linux from a user point of view

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linuxd.wordpress: The other day this guy that lives with me was idleing around the house since he was formating his pc. He asked me “Do you have any recommendations for me?” Obviously, I said “Install ubuntu.” He wanted to know what’s in it for him.

The KOffice 2.0 beta, part 2: Graphical and charting programs

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Software Yesterday, I looked at the major applications in the first beta for KOffice 2.0. Now it's the turn of the rest of the beta: The KPlato project manager, KChart, the vector graphics editor Karbon, and the raster graphics editor Krita.

Ubuntu Has No Stepchildren, Only Independent Siblings

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Ubuntu This recent post is not the first time that the Ubuntu project and its sponsor, my employer, have been accused of neglecting Kubuntu. And it may not be the last. But please allow me to make some points.

KDE 4.1.2 Unmasked in Gentoo

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Gentoo I am very pleased to announce that KDE 4.1.2 is in the Gentoo official tree and I unmasked it a little earlier today. I think that all the big bugs have been squashed but there may be a few left lurking.

Mandriva 2009 - KDE4 for the mass adoption

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linuxexperimentation.blogspot: I confess I am a KDE fan. I had great hopes on KDE 4, I liked it very much for its radical new features. I tried KDE 4 with Debian, Kubuntu, OpenSuSE, Fedora but none were polished and ready to satisfy me. But I think the wait is over with yesterday's release of Mandriva 2009.

Open Source in Education

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OSS The very limited use of FOSS in the UK’s education sector has long been a source of much puzzlement and even anger - from this side of the IT divide at least.

Measuring the true success of

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OOo Is success measured in downloads, or up-loads ? are bugs filed as good as bugs fixed ? are volunteer marketers as valuable as volunteer developers ? Alternatively does success come through attracting and empowering developers, who have such fun writing the code that they volunteer their life, allegiance and dreams to improve it ?

What's new in Linux 2.6.27

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Linux New and improved Wi-Fi drivers now allow the kernel to routinely deal with a considerably higher number of 802.11n Wi-Fi chips than before. Add the gspca webcam driver and a host of further changes to kernel drivers and infrastructure and you get a Linux kernel with much better hardware support and a much wider range of features; in addition, 2.6.27 is said to be faster and better scalable than its predecessors.

OpenOffice 3.0 Final ready & is it good enough

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blogs.zdnet: 3.0 Final has already been uploaded to a variety of mirror download sites ahead of the official announcement Monday 13.

few distro quickies

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  • A Quick Glance at Fedora 10 beta

  • 24 hours with Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)
  • My switch to Ubuntu

20 websites that changed the world

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Web If there was one site that would change the world for ever, it would be the first ever website, created by internet pioneer Tim Berners-Lee.

Linus: On making releases..

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torvalds-family.blogspot: The whole point of a release is that it should be something reasonably stable. Stable enough so that people can take that release and use it as a base for the stable tree. It doesn't have to be perfect.

UserBase: A Tour

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Web Taking a break from my website “duties” (some other blog post), I thought of doing some UserBase “marketing”. This has been one of the pet projects of the KDE Community Working Group and one that I’ve been personally and deeply involved in. This “tour” tries to highlight some of the features and goals of the wiki.

I am not impressed with OpenOffice Impress

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ubuntulinuxtipstricks.blogspot: Impress makes LaTeX + Beamer look user-friendly. Now that I've gone through turning my OLF slides from boring black-on-white to prettier, I realize how much of a usability nightmare Impress is.

Power Outage downs openSUSE Servers

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SUSE We have a power outage in the part of the city of Nürnberg where the Novell office and the main server room is. This means that many of our servers are right down, especially the download redirector, the mailing lists, the openSUSE build service and

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.