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About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Sony Joins AllSeen Internet of Things Alliance Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:48pm
Story Google's sub-$100 'Android One' devices said to be unveiled on September 15 Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:45pm
Story Ubuntu MATE Developer Makes the System Look Like Windows XP Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:42pm
Story Camera Pi – How Raspberry Pi can see Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:38pm
Story The Companies That Support Linux: SanDisk Advances Storage Industry Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:35pm
Story Make Firefox for Android Yours: Switch Languages Easily, Customize Home Screens and Clear History Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:22pm
Story Android 4.4 mini-PC packs 64-bit quad-core Atom punch Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:17pm
Story boycott systemd Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:14pm
Story Sharing work is easier with an Open Document Format Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 11:01pm
Story Tails 1.1.1 is out Roy Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 1:36pm

Slackware 12.1

Filed under
Slack

blog.jjtcomputing: Slackware has been a Linux distro I’ve never really been interested in. It is the oldest distro still going and really did show it in my opinion. It was difficult to use, unfriendly and fairly slow.

Linux and Firefox market share - the reality

Filed under
Linux
Moz/FF

ivan.fomentgroup.org: You may have seen that, according to NetApps Linux is used by 1% (or in words - one percent) of online users. There’s one thing to note,

Game over for Linux netbooks?

Filed under
Hardware
  • Game over for Linux netbooks?

  • Living with a netbook: Toy or tiny notebook?
  • Open Source Netbook Protection: Adeona

Microsoft uses Big Buck Bunny to Demonstrate Silverlight

Filed under
Microsoft

A couple of weeks ago I attended the yearly National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) trade show in Las Vegas. This year the show itself was a little quieter than usual - for example the RED camera circus wasn't in town, drawing hundreds, blocking aisles and making a nuisance of itself - which generally meant it was easier to walk around, talk to people and actually learn a few things.

10 Awesome Linux Applications for Your PlayStation 3

Filed under
Software

maximumpc.com: So you’ve installed that shiny Ubuntu distro onto your PlayStation 3 and finagled a couple of cool applications to boot. And yet, there’s still a lot of empty real estate on that newly formatted hard drive.

About UbuntuOne --

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.ibeentoubuntu.com: I've been waffling for a couple of days over whether to write this post or not. I finally decided to just speak my mind.

Linux certifications: Hot or not?

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: But some in the Linux community say the emergence of certifications is by no means a golden ticket for admins, and perhaps just a waste of time and money.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 71

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #71 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Get Ready for the openSUSE Community Week, Jan-Simon Möller: GSoC Introduction openSUSE @ ARM, and Katarina Machalkova: Secret AutoYaST features.

Open source shrugs at EU liability plans

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: Open source writers who are also market players, like our Matt Asay and Infoworld’s Savio Rodrigues, are dumping on a European Commission (EC) proposal to make software sellers liable for the problems in their code, just as dishwasher makers are liable for problems.

The Problem With X

Filed under
Software

connectedinternet.co.uk: Xwindows is the GUI that pretty much every free and non-free unix and unix-like OS uses. Xwindows is a paradox, in that in some ways it is advanced, especially considering it’s age.

Brits to test life without Windows

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Two British IT workers are planning to spend a month without Windows, using GNU/Linux instead in a project designed to see whether "the Linux operating system is capable of delivering the function and style of delivery that an established Windows user can adapt to easily."

Ubuntu Fans Move Quickly to Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: When it comes to deploying Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope), Canonical’s installed base seems to be a loyal, eager crowd.

Lazy Linux

Filed under
Linux

steveno.wordpress: Do you ever get tired of putting a lot of effort in to Linux? Get tired of waiting for things to compile? Grow wearing of trying to figure out why something fails to compile? I do.

The Open Database Alliance: Forking MySQL?

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com: With Oracle now owning MySQL, I think that the need for an independent true Open Source entity for MySQL is even bigger than ever before.

China deploys secure computer operating system

Filed under
OS

smh.com.au: Coleman told the Times that Kylin has been under development since 2001 and the first Chinese computers to use it are government and military servers that were converted beginning in 2007.

12 Worthy Alternative Browsers for Linux

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Even though Firefox is the default browser in most Linux distro, that doesn’t mean you have to confine yourselves to Firefox. So, check out 12 alternative browsers for Linux.

The Many Flavors of Linux

Filed under
Linux

beginlinux.wordpress: Even the smallest amount if research into Linux will have illustrated the sheer range of distributions out there. They are all based on the original Linux kernel built by Linus Torvalds (the father of modern Linux) and can all inter-operate to varying degrees.

Health Check: Ubuntu and Debian's special relationship

Filed under
Ubuntu

h-online.com: Ubuntu is five years old. The release of Jaunty Jackalope coincided with the fifth anniversary of a meeting that Mark Shuttleworth called of a dozen or so Debian Developers in his London flat in April 2004 to map out his project to create a distribution that was capable of taking Linux to the masses.

State of the GNU/Linux Desktop 2009 Part 3/4: Infrastructural Enhancements

Filed under
Linux

codingexperiments.com: This category of purely under-the-hood work is not immediately obvious and thus is often under-appreciated, but yields many useful improvements to the Free Desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Blockchain Startups Venture Beyond Bitcoin
    Bitcoin is the most widely-known example of blockchain-based technology, but many of today's startups are looking past the cryptocurrency and towards other, more business-friendly implementations. European blockchain startup incubator Outlier Ventures and Frost & Sullivan have mapped out the blockchain startup landscape, identifying several key areas of activity. It outlines possible paths to success following a busy year for blockchain investments.
  • Another Sandy Bridge Era Motherboard Now Supported By Coreboot
    The Sapphire Pure Platinum H61 is the latest motherboard to be supported by mainline Coreboot for replacing the board's proprietary BIOS.
  • OSI Welcomes the Journal of Open Source Software as Affiliate Member
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), a global non-profit organization formed to educate about and advocate for the benefits of open source software and communities, announced that the Journal Of Open Source Software (JOSS), a peer-reviewed journal for open source research software packages, is now an OSI affiliate member.
  • Open source project uses Docker for serverless computing
    Serverless computing has fast become a staple presence on major clouds, from Amazon to Azure. It’s also inspiring open source projects designed to make the concept of functions as a service useful to individual developers. The latest of these projects, called simply Functions as a Service (FaaS) by developer and Linux User contributor Alex Ellis, uses Docker and its native Swarm cluster management technology to package any process as a function available through a web API.
  • PyCharm 2017.1, MicroStrategy 2017.1, Next.js 2.0, and Ubuntu 17.04 final beta released — SD Times news digest: March 27, 2017
  • Open source JavaScript, Node.js devs get NPM Orgs for free
    The SaaS-based tool, which features capabilities like role-based access control, semantic versioning, and package discovery, now can be used on public code on the NPM registry, NPM Inc. said on Wednesday. Developers can transition between solo projects, public group projects, and commercial projects, and users with private registries can use Orgs to combine code from public and private packages into a single project.
  • Slaying Monoliths at Netflix with Node.js
    The growing number of Netflix subscribers -- nearing 85 million at the time of this Node.js Interactive talk -- has generated a number of scaling challenges for the company. In his talk, Yunong Xiao, Principal Software Engineer at Netflix, describes these challenges and explains how the company went from delivering content to a global audience on an ever-growing number of platforms, to supporting all modern browsers, gaming consoles, smart TVs, and beyond. He also looks at how this led to radically modifying their delivery framework to make it more flexible and resilient.
  • Mudlet, the open source MUD client has a new major stable build available
    I don't know how many of you play MUDs, but Mudlet, an open source cross-platform MUD client has hit version 3.0.

today's howtos

Minimal Linux Live

Minimal Linux Live is, as the name suggests, a very minimal Linux distribution which can be run live from a CD, DVD or USB thumb drive. One of the things which set Minimal Linux Live (MLL) apart from other distributions is that, while the distribution is available through a 7MB ISO file download, the project is designed to be built from source code using a shell script. The idea is that we can download scripts that will build MLL on an existing Linux distribution. Assuming we have the proper compiler tools on our current distribution, simply running a single shell script and waiting a while will produce a bootable ISO featuring the MLL operating system. Yet another option the MLL project gives us is running the distribution inside a web browser using a JavaScript virtual machine. The browser-based virtual machine running MLL can be found on the project's website, under the Emulator tab. This gives us a chance to try out the operating system in our web browser without installing or building anything. I decided to try the MLL build process to see if it would work and how long it would take if everything went smoothly. I also wanted to find out just how much functionality such a small distribution could offer. The project's documentation mostly covers building MLL on Ubuntu and Linux Mint and so I decided to build MLL on a copy of Ubuntu 16.04 I had running in a virtual machine. The steps to build MLL are fairly straight forward. On Ubuntu, we first install six packages to make sure we have all the required dependencies. Then we download an archive containing MLL's build scripts. Then we unpack the archive and run the build script. We just need to type four commands in Ubuntu's virtual terminal to kick-start the build process. Read more

GCC Compiler Tests At A Variety Of Optimization Levels Using Clear Linux

For those curious about the impact of GCC compiler optimization levels, a variety of benchmarks were carried out using GCC 6.3 on Intel's Clear Linux platform. Read more Also: LLVM 4.0.1 Planning, Aiming For Better Stable Releases