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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE and Akademy Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 8:22pm
Story Fedora: The Latest Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 8:19pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 8:14pm
Story Leftovers: OSS Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 8:13pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 8:07pm
Story Phoronix on Graphics Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 8:00pm
Story Installing Linux on a Mac, Why Bother? Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 7:39pm
Story Rackspace reaching out to women with ‘Linux for Ladies’ Roy Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 7:35pm
Story FreeBSD 10.2-RC2 Released, Riding On Schedule Nicely Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 6:58pm
Story Find the Perfect Linux-Compatible PC with Ubuntu's Hardware Database Rianne Schestowitz 01/08/2015 - 6:52pm

Production Model Boxee Box Finally Shown Off

Filed under
Hardware

nexus404.com: With more and more content being made available over the Internet and more and more television manufacturers cutting the prices of their hardware, it’s become almost a necessity to get some type of Internet connected set-top box.

KDE 4.5 RC2 available for Mandriva 2010 Spring

Filed under
KDE
MDV

not403.blogspot: The second release candidate release of KDE 4.5 was released last week and again thanks to neoclust we have packages for Mandriva 2010 Spring.

POLL RESULTS: Best 2010 Linux Distro Release

Filed under
Linux

cristalinux.blogspot: Three weeks...
430 voters...
One "Champion" Distro...

Five Ubuntu power tips

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.techrepublic.com: Ubuntu is widely regarded as a distribution that’s geared for Linux beginners, so most Ubuntu tips are aimed at the newbie crowd. Jack Wallen introduces some more sophisticated tricks to enhance your Ubuntu experience.

What Good is it if They Don't Know it's Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: Just like Marcel Gagne said, stop apologizing for Linux! "Invisible Linux" is a loser strategy, and it's insulting.

OpenSUSE 11.3 Netbook Benchmarks

Filed under
SUSE

phoronix.com: Following yesterday's release of openSUSE 11.3 we tested this updated Linux operating system that's sponsored by Novell on an Intel Atom netbook and compared the performance to that of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS and Fedora 13. Here are the results.

Ready or Not: Your Network is Moving to IPv6

itexpertvoice.com: You may have avoided moving your network to IPv6 for years, but you won’t be able to put it off much longer. Here’s why you need to plan for a transition.

Keeping things simple: the Linux kernel

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blogs: One of the huge advantages I have found over the years when working with Linux machines, is the ingenious design of the kernel itself.

How to Make Windows Faster than Linux

Filed under
Humor

junauza.com: In terms of speed, we can't deny the fact that Linux has an edge over Windows. I'm here to teach you how to make Windows faster than Linux.

NVIDIA Updates Two Of Their Old Legacy Drivers

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: NVIDIA has finally got around to issuing an update to two of their legacy drivers that allows those with old GeForce hardware to run it with newer Linux distributions using X.Org Server 1.8.

RedHat Enterprise Linux 6 Beta - I can't wait

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: Do you know what will happen in 2017? RedHat Enterprise Linux 6 will still be officially supported, seven years after being introduced in late 2010. This is a good thing. But do you know what's even better?

London Stock Exchange CTO leaves during move to Linux

computerworlduk.com: The London Stock Exchange, which is currently in the process of moving its trading platforms to Linux, has lost its chief technology officer, Robin Paine.

Intel Can't Ship Their Own Driver With Their MeeGo OS

phoronix.com: With the introduction of Intel's Poulsbo (GMA 500) chipset it marked a point at which Intel's Linux graphics support was no longer stellar, but as they had outsourced the graphics IP from Imagination Technologies, they could not provide an open-source driver stack like they do with their in-house IGPs.

FreeType 2.4 now free from patent restrictions

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: The FreeType development team has released version 2.4 of the rendering library for TrueType and PostScript fonts. FreeType is used in almost all Linux and open source Unix systems.

An Open Source 8-Bit Computer to Save the World

Filed under
Hardware

linuxjournal.com: At a recent local LUG I regularly attend, Braddock Gaskill gave a wonderful presentation on an open source 8-bit computer he had created. This was his first public debut of the device and every person in attendance was enthralled.

Inside Novell's New openSUSE Build Service

Filed under
SUSE

linuxplanet.com: Sean Michael Kerner How is a Linux distribution put together? For Novell's openSUSE, it starts with its newly improved Build Service 2.0.

Mandriva Linux 2010 spring “Farman” Review

Filed under
MDV

raymond.cc: Recently, the 2010 edition of Mandriva rolled out the presses and became available to download. For those who know nothing at all about Mandriva or it’s history, I must explain why to me this is a big deal.

Ten extensions that give Firefox new reach

Filed under
Moz/FF

zdnet.co.uk (techrepublic): Firefox has added collections to the choice of useful extensions since the last time I looked at this topic. Collections bring together related extensions. So here is my latest list.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Capturing miniDV in Linux… It works!
  • How To Get Started with Open Source in K-12
  • Piper Jaffray Reiterates Overweight Rating on Red Hat
  • Adobe Moves All of Its Open Source Projects to Sourceforge
  • Listen To Internet Radio In Ubuntu Using Tunapie
  • The Linux Link Tech Show #362 7/14/10
  • Ubuntu Pentest Edition – For penetration testing
  • Jolicloud 1.0 netbook OS starts roll out
  • More Upside For Red Hat?
  • Open source should target government desktops as Microsoft shunned
  • New Zealand Open Source Awards 2010 now open for nominations
  • Open Source hardware advocates want a hard-core license
  • The 3dfx Linux Driver Has Hope & It's Getting TTM
  • Autokey – Desktop automation utility for Linux and X11
  • Source diving for sysadmins
  • Software competition to encourage East African developers

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Memcached is an in-memory key-value store for small chunks of arbitrary data
  • Z shell made easy
  • Ubuntu – How To Fix Missing Titlebars…
  • 7 Essential emacs Editor Navigation Fundamentals
  • How to Create Your Own Customized Ubuntu Live CD
  • Using qDebug
  • ATI HD57xxx fglrx drivers under openSUSE 11.3
  • OpenSuse Offline Codec Installer
  • How to turn off the message “Thanks for flying vim"
  • HOWTO: OpenVZ and Sabayon, a perfect match
  • Use Number Pad as Mousekeys to Move cursor on the screen
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Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

  • Best Web Browser
    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.
  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots
    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.
  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited
    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today. I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.
  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience
    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.

Programming: Pyenv, GitHub, LLVM

  • Pyenv – Python Version Management Made Easier
    You’re a programmer who wants to test your python code on multiple different Python environments. What would you do? Install a specific python version and test your code and then uninstall that version and again install another different version and test code? No, wait! It is completely unnecessary. Say hello to Pyenv , an useful utility to manage multiple Python versions, simultaneously. It made the python version management easier than ever. It is used to install, uninstall and switch to multiple different versions of Python.
  • GitHub Predicts Hottest 2018 Open Source Trends
    As the world’s largest repository of open source projects, GitHub is in a unique position to witness what developers are up to. GitHub staff recently sifted through the site’s 2017’s data in order to identify top open source trends they predict will thrive in 2018.
  • What is LLVM? The power behind Swift, Rust, Clang, and more
    New languages, and improvements on existing ones, are mushrooming throughout the develoment landscape. Mozilla’s Rust, Apple’s Swift, Jetbrains’s Kotlin, and many other languages provide developers with a new range of choices for speed, safety, convenience, portability, and power. Why now? One big reason is new tools for building languages—specifically, compilers. And chief among them is LLVM (Low-Level Virtual Machine), an open source project originally developed by Swift language creator Chris Lattner as a research project at the University of Illinois.

Security: Reproducible Builds, Windows Phones, Debian, Mageia Identity Security Breach and More

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #147
  • Windows Phones Get Cumulative Update KB4074592, PDF Support Now Broken
    Just when you thought Windows 10 Mobile is dead, here’s Microsoft rolling out a new cumulative update for the platform as part of its February patching cycle. Windows 10 cumulative update KB4074592, which is also released on PCs running the Creators Update (version 1703) – phones have never received the Fall Creators Update, comes with little changes for mobile devices, though it does something that many users might notice. Microsoft doesn’t provide a separate change log for mobile and PC, so the release notes that you can find at the end of the article include all the improvements and security fixes that Microsoft included in KB4074592 for both platforms.
  • Time to Join Extended Long Term Support for Debian 7 Wheezy
    Debian 7 Wheezy LTS period ends on May 31st and some companies asked Freexian if they could get security support past this date. Since about half of the current team of paid LTS contributors is willing to continue to provide security updates for Wheezy, I have started to work on making this possible.
  • Hackers Infiltrated Tesla to Mine Cryptocurrency
    While Elon Musk was busy planning how to launch his Tesla Roadster into the depths of space last month, a hacker was silently using Tesla’s computing power to mine an unknown amount of cryptocurrency. The unidentified attackers found their way in through cracks in Tesla’s cloud environment, according to a report issued by RedLock security on February 20. The miners were able to gain access via an unprotected Tesla Kubernete console—an open source system that manages applications. Included on this console were the access credentials to Tesla’s Amazon Web Service. Once they obtained access to the console, the attackers were able to run scripts that allowed them to stealthily mine cryptocurrency.
  • Hacking at EPFL Toastmasters, Lausanne, tonight
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  • Mageia Identity Security Breach
    A user was able to gain access to our LDAP database and has published the email addresses and names, as well as apparent password hashes, of anyone who has signed up to identity.mageia.org. However, the published hashes do not match those on record, and all capitalisation has been removed, so it is not clear that the actual passwords have been compromised. All of the passwords have since been reset as a security precaution. New rules have been added to prevent access to the LDAP server. The sysadmins are investigating how the fields were read, as the configuration should have specifically prevented this. The passwords stored by the Mageia LDAP server are hashed and salted, meaning that the full decryption of the password, if they have actually been leaked, into a human-usable format would require significant computing power for safe and complex passwords.