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Friday, 24 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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SourceForge® Implements OpenID Technology

Filed under
OSS

SourceForge today announced inclusion of the OpenID functionality in their SourceForge.net website. SourceForge.net users can now log in with an OpenID and receive a corresponding SourceForge.net identity for use at other sites that support OpenID logins.

Autotools: a practitioner's guide to autoconf, automake and libtool

Filed under
Reviews

freesoftwaremagazine.com: This book is written for the open source software package maintainer. I’m purposely not using the terms “free software” or “proprietary software that’s free”. The use of the term “open source” is critical in this context. You see, open source defines a type of software distribution channel.

AbiWord team interview

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Interviews

redhatmagazine.com: AbiWord just had a great 2.6 release and the developers took several hours of their spare time over a few weeks period answering questions and providing information. Thanks to the team and especially MarcMaurer for his time and patience. We present you a detailed interview with the AbiWord team on a broad range of topics.

Tomboy note-taker keeps you organized

Filed under
Software

linux.com: I use Tomboy, an open source notetaking app, to cull and organize the hundreds of bits of information I track, and to prioritize it on to-do lists on the fly. When we first reviewed Tomboy 0.3.5, it had some obvious flaws. The project has had a number of updates since then, and the newest version, 0.10.0, really makes the grade.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Enterprise Unix Roundup: OpenSolaris, Farm Team or Big League?

  • IBM Fuels New Blue Biz Initiative With Linux
  • Creative Commons promotes standard license expression
  • The heron has landed: a review of Ubuntu 8.04
  • Outsider to lobby for OLPC Down Under
  • With Linux vs. Because of Linux
  • Pandora the Linux gaming handheld console
  • Update on DeviceKit
  • Mozilla: Firefox plugin shipped with malicious code
  • Millionaires, Billionaires, and Open Source
  • Response Team Boosts Open Source Security
  • Proof that Linux is for geeks with too much time on their hands!
  • Not Necessarily Parallel
  • Ubuntu for Kids
  • The kernel that fixes the Ubuntu hibernation regression
  • Why many MCSEs won’t learn Linux
  • Interactive Kernel Map

misc app shorts

Filed under
Software
  • Terminator: A Kick-ass Terminal

  • Browse Mouselessly With Conkeror
  • Ubuntu Tweak 0.3.1 released
  • Raptor Menu explores KDE 4 Possibilities
  • id Software Starts Work On Doom 4!

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Play multimedia content with style using Entertainer

  • How do I find a Unix / Linux command?
  • Using Styles in OpenOffice.org Writer
  • Using a Gentoo Prefixed shell as your login shell
  • Yahoo Mail on Thundebird (ubuntu based guide)

Oracle crowns Red Hat the Linux king

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: For those who had forgotten, Oracle provides Linux support. It's called "Unbreakable Linux." Most of you stopped thinking about it long ago, but for those who didn't, Oracle's chief corporate architect, Edward Screven decided to remind everyone.

First look: OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta a big step forward

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OOo

arstechnica.com: It has been almost three years since the release of OpenOffice.org 2.0. During that time we've seen community fragmentation and frustration resulting from Sun's heavy involvement with the office suite's development, and even a third-party online version that provides editing and collaboration features. Now, the open source office suite is back with a new 3.0 beta release.

Opera 9.27 Review

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Software

osweekly.com: Opera is light years faster than other browsers I have tried in the past. Most pages load in a fraction of a second on broadband, even during peak usage times. But even with its tremendous speed, some pages using WordPress, among other content management systems, are not always being rendered correctly.

Linux facing first real desktop test

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: We’ve recently seen the popular EeePc in Windows XP form. There are even concerns that Linux in the EeePC ultra-portable computers — or indeed Linux in the larger subnotebook, mini-notebook or whatever you want to call this emerging category — is now likely to evaporate in the face of Windows versions.

Also: Linux Buyers Are Being Ripped-Off

Xubuntu: Better than Ubuntu (at least for me)

Filed under
Ubuntu

hartmansblog.blogspot: There are approximately 200 workstations around campus for student use of which approximately 35 are Pentium 4 powered. The rest are either P3 or P2 machines with around 256MB RAM. The simple fact of the matter is that with machines like these there are few options when it comes to Operating Systems. Xubuntu though seems to work pretty well.

And: Thoughts on Linux/Ubuntu

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 21

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #21 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. Highlights this week include openSUSE 11.0 Beta 2, People of openSUSE: Greg Kroah-Hartman, and Jigish Gohil: Sliced sphere in compiz-fusion-git packages.

Also: Another NASA supercomputer with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
And: Could Novell kill OpenSolaris?

Interview with Bluewhite64 creator Attila Craciun

Filed under
Interviews

linux.com: Slackware Linux has stood strong for more than a decade by refusing to compromise. There was a time when people used to say, "If you want to learn Linux and learn it well, give Slackware a try." Attila Craciun, a Romanian software developer and Linux enthusiast, has ported the Slackware tree to the AMD64 architecture to create the Bluewhite64 distro. We spoke with him to find out about Bluewhite64, where it came from, and where it's going.

blueMarine - Linux Digital Photo Workflow

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Software

maysville-linux-users-group.org: blueMarine is an open source application for the digital photo workflow, the blueMarine project will provide you an all-in-one tool for managing your photos, from the shoot up to the archiving and beyond.

Ubuntu ported to a PDA

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxdevices: Ubuntu Linux 7.04 is now available for Sharp's Zaurus PDAs. The 0.1 release comes with a minimalist filesystem that can be launched in an emulator, enhanced with software from the vast Ubuntu archives, and then flashed onto a real Zaurus.

"Can we fix it? Yes, we can!"

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OSS

Jeremy Allison: The OOXML document format war is over, and the good guys lost. The world will be a worse place because of it, for a long time to come. I recently got to attend a couple of conferences. Jim Zemlin, the head of the Linux Foundation, has a vision of where Linux should go in the next ten years, and it is breathtaking in scope.

The computer security paradox

Filed under
Security

raiden.net: One of the most prized rights of any American is the right to privacy and security. It's something people in some countries would kill for. Yet now there appears to be a very frightening trend growing. Your privacy and security are being thrown out the window wholesale in favor of easier access by law enforcement.

On Linux Hardware Compatibility

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

terminally-incoherent.com: I love how anti-linux advocates and windows fanbois always pick on Linux for hardware compatibility or rather lack of thereof. Just about every rant about Linux I have seen so far includes a gripe about it not supporting new or exotic hardware out of the box. Funny thing is that, neither does Windows.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Back on the Linux bandwagon

  • Enable DVD Playback, Flash and MP3 Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu on Windows with Wubi
  • Known hardy bugs and workarounds
  • gimpsvn.sh — Install or update to GIMP 2.5 from SVN on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron nests at Fox News
  • A Smart Feature of Ubuntu You May Not Have Noticed
  • Installing Four Other Desktop Edition on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu removing XML from Python?
  • Fun with Amazon S3 in Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more

DAISY: A Linux-compatible text format for the visually impaired

If you're blind or visually impaired like I am, you usually require various levels of hardware or software to do things that people who can see take for granted. One among these is specialized formats for reading print books: Braille (if you know how to read it) or specialized text formats such as DAISY. Read more