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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Zenwalk 6.4: Simple yet Awesome

Filed under
Linux

itnewstoday.com: It’s been a long time since I last took a look at Zenwalk. I’ve always had a sweet spot for it, though I haven’t had a chance to really give it a full spin in quite some time. Although I am primarily a KDE user, there’s something about Zenwalk that always keeps my attention: It’s simple, fast, and gets the job done.

openSUSE 11.3 is here!

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the release of the latest incarnation of openSUSE, with support for 32-bit and 64-bit systems. openSUSE 11.3 is packed with new features and updates.

Using Compiz As A Windows Management Tool

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: You’ve seen the wobbly windows, you’ve seen the cube, you’ve seen the raindrops. Compiz is just a bunch of useless eye candy right? Wrong.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • screen’s competition: tmux
  • Using Camera RAW with Linux
  • Large Text File (logs) viewer - Rowscope
  • Find the Python shell of your dreams in DreamPie
  • Ubuntu Manual Project core philosophy
  • Android 2.2 (FroYo) review
  • How Many Types of Linux Do We Need?
  • Here's The 3dfx Banshee, Voodoo DRM/KMS Driver
  • Pr09studio Introduces Probably The Best Collection of Ubuntu Wallpapers Ever
  • Probably The Best 5 GnoMenu Themes
  • Linux: No bloatware, popups, and annoyances
  • fedora branding fonts
  • DebConf10: the Debian Project
  • FLOSS Weekly 127: Guillermo Amaral

Two Problems with Free

Filed under
OSS
  • Two Problems with Free
  • The Open source legal maze: an open trap?
  • Open Source Cornerstones
  • Portugal: Nearly all school children getting familiar with open source
  • Net Neutrality is a double edged sword
  • Is open source ready for business prime time?
  • Open-source hardware standards formally issued
  • Open Source Hardware (OSHW) Draft Definition version 0.3

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • PDF Manipulations And Conversions From Linux Command Prompt
  • UNIX / Linux Basics: Part VIII
  • Unix How-To: Tricks for Working with Filenames
  • Beautify your GNOME desktop
  • Migrate / Move MySQL Database And Users To New Server
  • Change a MySQL Table from MyISAM to InnoDB
  • Getting to Grips with GRUB 2
  • HOWTO: Cross compiling the kernel for the Mini2440
  • The Ultimate Logrotate Command Tutorial with 10 Examples
  • Running Linux on new OpenRisc simulator or1ksim 0.4.0
  • How to install Nanny on Mint 9 and Ubuntu 10.04

Installing applications in Linux with a double click

ghacks.net: For many, the biggest barrier to adopting Linux is the challenge of having to use the command line for too many tasks. One of these tasks, it is though, is the installation of applications.

Portable Linux Apps - Fun Fav Apps from any Linux w/ USB

Filed under
Software

omgubuntu.co.uk: Ever wanted to run your favourite Linux applications from a USB sticks on ANY major Linux distribution with the need to install anything? Then prepare to say hello to Portable Linux Applications.

Get ready for a whole new forge

Filed under
OSS
Web

sourceforge.net: Today SourceForge is announcing an open beta period for a new set of tools for developers. Specifically, our engineers have begun work on new and better tools for project members who want to use our tracker, wiki, and source code management.

Pidgin's Buddy pounce, a powerful Notification Feature

Filed under
Software

linuxers.org: Consider this scenario - you want to have an imp. discussion with someone on your chat list and the person is marked away. You are wondering if there is any way you could be notified when he returns.

Unigine Is Working On A Strategy Game

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Earlier this month the developers behind the Unigine Engine shared their latest update on this advanced 3D engine that's fully supported under Linux.

Top Solaris developer flees Oracle

theregister.co.uk: Greg Lavender, the lead developer in charge of the Solaris operating system at Oracle, has left the company.

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.35 (Part 2) - File systems and storage

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Direct I/O and improved out-of-space handling for Btrfs, optimisations for XFS and OCFS2, major restructuring measures for the Libata driver and extended RAID migration options are among the most important changes in Linux 2.6.35.

Fedora 14 Theme Preview

Filed under
Linux

mairin.wordpress: At last week’s design team meeting, we made a decision about the direction of the overall theme for Fedora 14′s artwork, which will affect – among other things – the default wallpaper.

Happy birthday, Open Source - you're legal now

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: Today is a landmark in open source history, the unofficial birthday of the movement. On this day, in 1992, version 0.1 of 386BSD (you might know it as Jolix) was released.

My Favorite 4 RSS Feed Readers

Filed under
Software

techdrivein.com: A quick collection of my favorite RSS feed reader applications for Ubuntu desktop. Even though it is totally out of place in my Gnome desktop, Akregator is my favorite among the lot. But after exploring a bit further, I found feed readers like Yarssr really good and easy to use. So here is my list.

Open source celebrity to visit Oz

Filed under
OSS

Spotlight on Linux: Pardus Linux 2009.2

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Pardus Linux is one of those distributions that doesn't get the attention it probably deserves. Pardus makes a wonderful desktop system for those that prefer ease of use. Available as an install image or live CD, it ships with lots of great applications, multimedia support, and browser plugins.

5 things to look forward to in Ubuntu 10.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

techthrob.com: Maverick Meerkat, the version of Ubuntu slated to be released later this year, brings with it several features and improvements that the Linux community has been eagerly looking forward to. I’ve taken a look at the blueprints for this next release, and picked out a few of the major items that Linux end-users will be interested in.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface. Read more

Fedora and Red Hat's Finances

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.