Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Ebb & Flow, Red Hat Oops, and Chakra Reviewed Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2014 - 4:20am
Story Stencyl 3.0 Released, A Game Creation Kit With No Programming Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2014 - 2:58am
Story Intel aims 2.3GHz quad-core 64-bit SoC at Android 4.4 Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2014 - 2:46am
Story News Flash from Redmond: FOSS Causes Dissatisfaction! Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2014 - 2:33am
Story 12 Completely Free, Open-Source Linux Games Rianne Schestowitz 25/02/2014 - 1:14am
Story Neovim: Rewriting & Modernizing The Vim Editor Rianne Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 10:40pm
Story What's the best Linux desktop environment for me? Rianne Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 10:10pm
Story The magic of the disappearing Linux distros Rianne Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 10:01pm
Story How Mozilla Thinks It Can Punch Above Its Weight With Firefox OS Smartphones Roy Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 9:56pm
Story Firefox OS adds PhoneGap support, wins developers Rianne Schestowitz 24/02/2014 - 9:53pm

Browser Review: Mozilla Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF By some estimates, more than 1.4 billion people use the Internet for work, entertainment, or commerce. All of those web surfers must use a browser to visit websites or shop at online stores, and if browsing speed, security, and functionality matter, those users should be cruising the information super highway with the Mozilla Firefox 3 web browser.

What's new in OpenOffice 3?

Filed under
  • What's new in OpenOffice 3?

  • OOo: Thoughts about the importance of Extensions
  • Installing 3.0
  • How to Install 3.0 on Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex
  • 3.0 launch overwhelms servers

Linux games - First Person Shooters - Part Deux

Filed under
Gaming It's time for some more fast-paced action! Today, we'll talk about games where you play as a human - against other humans. Our two candidates are AssaultCube and Urban Terror.

Moonlight - what’s the big deal?

Filed under
Software Hardly a day goes by that I don’t see an article on Linux Today about Moonlight and what a horrible person Miguel de Icaza is. So I thought I’d go ahead and do some exploration of what’s going on with Moonlight and Silverlight.

My FOSS Graphic Application WishList

Filed under
Software There's a number of new graphics applications that I've been searching all over for. They may or may not have been invented yet. So I'm posting this little list, to the purpose of either...

Fedora LTS (aka “believing in Santa”)

Filed under
Linux Why isn't there any Fedora LTS? Because they don't want it. Officially, it's because there is not enough manpower. Besides, the “Fedora spirit” is the same as the “Ubuntu spirit”, that is “pushing the latest-and-greatest bugs-features-and-zombies ASAP, so that we release twice a year”.

Gnash 0.8.4 released

Filed under
Software The third beta release of Gnash has just been made at version 0.8.4. Gnash is a GPL'd SWF movie player and browser plugin for Firefox, Mozilla, and Konqueror.

How Linux Helped 5 Poverty-Stricken Governments

Filed under
Linux Imagine you are the minister of education of an impoverished country, with a limited budget to improve your schooling system. You are not aware of such thing called “Open Source” what would happen? You would probably end up spending thousands on software to equip your school’s computers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
  • OpenOffice 3.0 released amid fears of development stagnation

  • OK, now OpenOffice is definitely good enough
  • OpenOffice Hits 3.0: Can It Challenge Microsoft?
  • BeBop Linux Released
  • So Long Mandriva, It Was Nice Meeting You
  • My Two Biggest Ubuntu Gripes
  • Linux can save UK schools billions: Part 2
  • The Linux opportunity buried in the Unix market share data
  • Linux powered mini-machines for Macs
  • Opinion: High-performance nonsense
  • Switch to Linux Today! bsod Linux Flier
  • Jamie's Random Musings on Video IM
  • Keeping the Kernel Klean
  • My Quick Ohio Linux Fest Recap
  • Open source enables value-based business models
  • Discovery - VSTi Analog Synthesis For Linux
  • Yakuake — yet another pop-up terminal
  • Mono 2.0 has been released. So what?
  • ICANN using Drupal
  • Should software developers do it for themselves?
  • RadeonHD 1.2.2 & 1.2.3 Drivers Released

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Use ImageMagick to convert pdf to png

  • Certificate Authority (CA) with OpenSSL
  • Setup SSL on Apache
  • Manage Your Synchronization And Backup Easily With Conduit For Linux
  • Install GIMP 2.6 in Ubuntu 8.04
  • Run GIMP 2.6.1 image editor from a flash drive
  • Set Operations in the Unix Shell

Mandriva Linux 2009.0 : upgrade successful

Filed under
MDV I tried to remain in the position of a newcomer that has no clue about what a command line interface is, so even if I used a terminal a couple of times, it was just to check some stuff, not to fix it. Here's how it went.

Linux is not a "Bazaar" and BSD is not a "Cathedral"

Filed under
Linux When it comes to development styles, it has been said time and again that BSD uses the Cathedral model of development, and Linux uses the Bazaar. But that's incorrect.

Buying A Netbook? Think Linux

Filed under
Linux Many netbook computer buyers are still reluctant to "take a chance" on Linux rather than Windows XP. But which operating system is really the riskier choice for a netbook buyer?

Linux takes a seat on Qantas’ new superjumbo

Filed under
Linux The Flying Kangaroo will soon become the Flying Penguin as Qantas embraces Linux-powered Inflight Entertainment systems from Panasonic.

Kernel Log: New stable kernels and Nvidia drivers, long-term maintenance for 2.6.27

Filed under
Linux Almost in parallel with the release of Linux 2.6.27 at the end of last week, the maintainers of the Linux stable series have also released two new kernels, and Both kernels offer a number of minor corrections and improvements over the two previous series 2.6.x kernel versions.

Dell Launches Consumer Advertising for Ubuntu Linux PCs

Filed under
Ubuntu It’s one small step for Dell and consumer Linux — and one giant leap for Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux efforts. Specifically, Dell is spending advertising dollars to promote PCs with Ubuntu Linux preinstalled.

Mandriva 2009

Filed under

celettu.wordpress: The end of the year traditionally is a very busy time for distribution lovers… Only major release so far has been Mandriva 2009. Let’s see if its place in the spotlight is deserved.

Which Linux makes the best business Windows replacement desktop?

Filed under

blogs.computerworld: Some of my Linux-savvy friends and I have been hashing out what the best Linux desktop would be for a SMB (small to medium sized business). Out of that conversation Ken Hess and Jason Perlow sees Ubuntu as the best Linux desktop. Ah... I disagree.

Mozilla launches video accessibility drive

Filed under
  • Mozilla launches video accessibility drive

  • Finer session restore for Firefox 3.1
  • FireFox for Mobile: first screenshots

Review: Dell Linux laptop

Filed under
Hardware This is a review of my new Dell Linux laptop, an Inspiron 1525. I am not a Windows user, and I’m tired of paying for Windows when I buy a new computer.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases. Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former. Read more