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About Tux Machines

Friday, 16 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Top Features Of The Linux 4.2 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 10:53pm
Story Ubuntu Core Receives Support For GPIO and I2C on the Raspberry Pi 2 - Video Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 10:50pm
Story GitHub Code Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 10:48pm
Story Linux Machines Produce Easy to Guess Random Numbers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 10:33pm
Story Android Smart lock: Should you be using it? Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 9:00pm
Story Ubuntu Touch to Get a LibreOffice Doc Viewer Soon Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 8:54pm
Story The New Ubuntu-Supported Video Driver PPA Is Well Received by Community Rianne Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 8:52pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 8:20pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 8:18pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/08/2015 - 8:18pm

Review of Qimo: Linux for Kids

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Linux We’ve talked about Linux software for kids a few times here at MakeTechEasier, but so far we’ve never actually sat down to take a closer look at whole distributions intended for children. Today we’ll take a look at what Qimo has to offer, and submit it to the ultimate test: a real live toddler.

My Favorite 10 xkcd Comics Part-2

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Humor As I have said before, I started searching for top 10 xkcd comics initially but ended up with nearly 20 of them. So here is the part-2 of my favorite 10 xkcd comics. Between, don't miss top 10 xkcd comics part-1.

Stupid tar Tricks

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HowTos One of the most common programs on Linux systems for packaging files is the venerable tar. tar is short for tape archive, and originally, it would archive your files to a tape device. Now, you're more likely to use a file to make your archive.

Hands-on: Firefox 4 beta 4 brings Tab Candy and Sync

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  • Hands-on: Firefox 4 beta 4 brings Tab Candy and Sync
  • Panorama in Firefox 4, your new eye-candy tab canvas

today's leftovers:

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  • KDE SC 4.5.1 will be tagged on 26 Aug
  • DebConf 10: Last day and retrospective
  • The future of open source licensing
  • Me-OS 1.1.0 Released
  • Allison Randal appointed Technical Architect of Ubuntu
  • Use Puppy Linux 5.0 for secure on-the-go browsing
  • Ubuntu Multi-Touch Videos: Evince And Inkscape
  • Nautilus revamped Places side-bar
  • Linux distro focuses on audio recording
  • publicly thanking dwdiff
  • openSUSE: Revising the Board Election Rules

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Checking Responses with ckrange
  • use custom keyboard shortcuts for a better workflow
  • Is packaging new software hard?
  • 15 (More) Awesome Conky Configurations
  • Packet Analyzer: 15 TCPDUMP Command Examples
  • Make Incremental Backups With Rsync
  • Set up an LDAP server on Fedora
  • Your own local repository for Mandriva
  • Fix Brasero copy and burn error
  • Fix Analog Devices AD1986A Speakers not working in Ubuntu

My Linux Computer is Acting Weird

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mandrivachronicles.blogspot: A few days ago, thanks to one student, I realized that something funny was happening with my Linux netbook.

Dell Vostro V13 review

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Ubuntu Lightweight notebooks usually have lightweight specs, but as John Brandon discovers, the Dell Vostro V13 is an exception to the rule…

Linux Mint 9 Xfce Screenshots

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Linux Most people that come into contact with Linux Mint tend to agree that it’s an excellent distributuion for beginners. In my opinion this is accomplished by the visual appeal and mint-specific tools you won’t find anywhere else.

The Debian apocalypse

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poisonbit.wordpress: I’ve been Debian user since many years ago. Debian is not Debian any more. Debian is canonical and canonical is Debian.

Trying out the Charka Project

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Linux The Charka Project starts with Arch Linux as a base but, instead of forcing you to build your own distro piece of piece, Charka comes more or less pre-packaged.

Apple's Enhanced OpenGL Stack Versus Linux

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Software In this article we are looking at the OpenGL performance of Mac OS X 10.6, 10.6.2, 10.6.3, 10.6.4, and 10.6.4 with this graphics update installed.

Kernel Log: New X Server, 3D drivers for Radeon 5000 and new stable kernels

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Linux While the new kernel versions mainly correct minor bugs,'s next generation X Server offers a range of improvements. Various code segments released by AMD developers allow the open source drivers for Radeon GPUs to utilise the 2D and 3D acceleration features available with Radeon series 5000 graphics cards.

Google adds phone calling to Gmail

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Google Google's Gmail isn't just a mailbox -- it now doubles as a phone. Users of Google's Web e-mail service can now call any phone in the U.S. or Canada for free from within their browser.

Thoughts on Sabayon Gnome 5.3

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distrocheck.wordpress: After having a horrible experience with certain distribution (maybe the version number didn’t help much) I was desperate to install anything else, so it was either Ubuntu or Sabayon 5.3 Gnome.

Spotlight on Linux: Parsix 3.6 (RC)

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Linux Parsix GNU/Linux is a great little distro hailing from the exotic lands of Persia. It features a lovely customized GNOME desktop and lots of handy applications. It reminds folks of Ubuntu in many ways and is often described as a nice alternative to Ubuntu

Ubuntu 10.10 Alpha: Slouching Toward Ubuntu GNOME

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Ubuntu Ubuntu 10.10, codenamed Maverick Meerkat, is still two months from its final release. However, if the first alpha and the forecasts about it are an accurate indication, the release is already taking on a character all its own.

2 Task Manager Apps You Can Live Without

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Software Both gToDo and Tasque task manager apps feature to-the-point, simple interfaces for helping you keep track of your busy to-do lists.

Microsoft: Looking For Love In All The Wrong Places

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  • Microsoft: Looking For Love In All The Wrong Places
  • Of course Microsoft loves open source
  • DtO: Tough Love

Fork me? Fork you!

Filed under
Software Bork, fork, bork, fork, bork, fork! Sounds like the Swedish Chef on a rampage Smile Seriously though, the only rampaging I can see right now are the reactions of both the proprietary companies and open source advocates.

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More in Tux Machines

SwagArch 18.02 - U Got Swag?

SwagArch sounds like an interesting concept. The aesthetic side of things is reasonable, although brown as a color and a dark theme make for a tricky choice. The fonts are pretty good overall. But the visual element is the least of the distro's problems. SwagArch 18.02 didn't deliver the basics, and that's what made Dedoimedo sad. Network support plus the clock issue, horrible package management and broken programs, those are things that must work perfectly. Without them, the system has no value. So you do get multimedia support and a few unique apps, however that cannot balance out all the woes and problems that I encountered. All in all, Swag needs a lot more work. Also, it will have a tough time competing with Manjaro and Antergos, which are already established and fairly robust Arch spins. Lastly, it needs to narrow down its focus. The overall integration of elements is pretty weak. Eclectic, jumbled, not really tested. 2/10 for now. Let's see how it evolves. Read more

How Open Source Approach is Impacting Science

Dive into the exciting world of Innovative Science to explore and find out about how the Linux-based Operating System and Open Source are playing a significant role in the major scientific breakthroughs that are taking place in our daily lives. Read more

Programming: Developer Survey, Code That Unmasks, Retaining Newcomers

  • Developers love trendy new languages but earn more with functional programming
    Developer Q&A site Stack Overflow performs an annual survey to find out more about the programmer community, and the latest set of results has just been published.
  • FYI: AI tools can unmask anonymous coders from their binary executables [Ed: Just a kind reminder that if you are e using Microsoft's tools compile source code, there will be surveillance and telemetry in your compiled code]
    Programmers can be potentially identified from the low-level machine-code instructions in their software executables by AI-powered tools. That's according to boffins from Princeton University, Shiftleft, Drexel University, Sophos, and Braunschweig University of Technology, who have described how stylometry can be applied to binary files. That's kinda bad news for people who wish to develop software, such as privacy-protecting apps, anonymously, as this technology can be used to potentially unmask them. It's also kinda good news for crimefighters trying to identify malware authors.
  • How to avoid humiliating newcomers: A guide for advanced developers
    Every year in New York City, a few thousand young men come to town, dress up like Santa Claus, and do a pub crawl. One year during this SantaCon event, I was walking on the sidewalk and minding my own business, when I saw an extraordinary scene. There was a man dressed up in a red hat and red jacket, and he was talking to a homeless man who was sitting in a wheelchair. The homeless man asked Santa Claus, "Can you spare some change?" Santa dug into his pocket and brought out a $5 bill. He hesitated, then gave it to the homeless man. The homeless man put the bill in his pocket. In an instant, something went wrong. Santa yelled at the homeless man, "I gave you $5. I wanted to give you one dollar, but five is the smallest I had, so you oughtta be grateful. This is your lucky day, man. You should at least say thank you!" [...] I still get angry at people on the internet. It happened to me recently, when someone posted a comment on a video I published about Python co-routines. It had taken me months of research and preparation to create this video, and then a newcomer commented, "I want to master python what should I do."

Software: 5 Online Backup Solutions, Lector, Roundcube

  • 5 Online Backup Solutions for Ubuntu Linux
    As the digital age progresses, the amount of data we produce each year is snowballing. There was a time when we could fit all of our personal digital data on a few floppy disks, but many of us now have hundreds of gigabytes, or even terabytes, of photos, videos, music, and documents that we need to backup and protect. Backing up our data locally is essential, but any good backup plan should also include off-site backups. “The Cloud” has promised us unlimited, cheap storage where we can save our ever-growing data. Online cloud backups should be a part of your overall backup plan, but it’s crucial that your data is secure, encrypted, and backed up automatically. Here are a few online backup tools that aim to make cloud backups easy for desktop Linux users.
  • This Qt eBook App for Linux is a Real Page Turner
    Lector a new open-source Qt-based ebook app for Linux desktops. It supports most common DRM-free ebook files, including EPUB, MOBI, and AZW, as well as comic book files in the CBZ or CBR format. In both visuals and in features Lector is something of a page-turner; a desktop ebook reader you can absolutely judge by its cover. So join me as I take a closer look at its features.
  • Roundcube fr_FEM locale 1.3.5
    Roundcube 1.3.5 was released today and with it, I've released version 1.3.5 of my fr_FEM (French gender-neutral) locale. This latest version is actually the first one that can be used with a production version of Roundcube: the first versions I released were based on the latest commit in the master branch at the time instead of an actual release. Not sure why I did that.